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ASC 842 lease accounting—get started today before it's too late

09.19.22

Read this if you want to understand the new lease accounting standard.

What is ASC 842?

ASC 842, Leases, is the new lease accounting standard issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). This new standard supersedes ASC 840. For entities that have not yet adopted the guidance from ASC 842, it is effective for non-public companies and private not-for-profit entities for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2021.

ASC 842 (sometimes referred to as Topic 842 or the new lease standard) contains guidance on the accounting and financial reporting for agreements meeting the standard’s definition of a lease. The goal of the new standard is to:

  • Streamline the accounting for leases under US GAAP and better align with International Accounting Standards lease standards 
  • Enhance transparency into liabilities resulting from leasing arrangements (particularly operating lease contracts)
  • Reduce off-balance-sheet activities

What is the definition of a lease under the new standard?

ASC 842 defines a lease as “A contract, or part of a contract, that conveys the right to control the use of identified property, plant, or equipment (an identified asset) for a period of time in exchange for consideration.” 

This definition outlines four primary characteristics to consider: 1) an identified asset, 2) the right to control the use of that asset, 3) a period of time, and 4) consideration.

(For a deeper dive into what constitutes a lease, you can download the BerryDunn lease accounting guide here.) 

How will this affect your organization?

  • Lease arrangements have to be classified as finance, operating, or short-term leases. In general accounting for the lease asset and liability is as follows:

    • For finance leases, use the effective interest method to amortize the liability, and amortize the asset on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Note that this has the effect of “front-loading” the expense into the early years of the lease.

    • For operating leases (e.g., equipment and some property leases), the lease asset and liability would be amortized to achieve a straight-line expense impact for each year of the lease term. ASC topic 842 establishes the right-of-use asset model, which shifts from the risk-and-reward approach to a control-based approach. 
  • Lessees will recognize a lease liability of the present value of the future minimum lease payments on the balance sheet and a corresponding right of use asset representing their right to use the leased asset over the lease term. 
  • The present value of the lease payments is required to be measured using the discount rate implicit in the lease if its readily determinable. More likely than not it will not be readily determinable, and you would use a discount rate that equals the lessee’s current borrowing rate (i.e., what it could borrow a comparable amount for, at a comparable term, using a comparable asset as collateral).
  • It will be critical to consider the effect of the new rules on your organization’s debt covenants. All things being equal, debt to equity ratios will increase as a result of adding lease liabilities to the balance sheet. Lenders and borrowers may need to consider whether to change required debt to equity ratios as they negotiate the terms of loan agreements.

Time to implement: What do you need to do next?

The starting place for implementation is ensuring you have a complete listing of all known lease contracts for real estate property, plant, and equipment. However, since leases can be in contracts that you would not expect to have leases, such as service contracts for storage space, long-term supply agreements, and delivery service contracts, you will also need to broaden your review to more than your organization’s current lease expense accounts. 


We recommend reviewing all expense accounts to look for recurring payments, because these often have the potential to have contracts that contain a lease. Once you have a list of recurring payments, review the contracts for these payments to identify leases. If the contract meets the elements of a lease—a contract, or part of a contract, that conveys the right to control the use of identified property, plant, or equipment (an identified asset) for a period of time in exchange for consideration—your organization has a lease that should be added to your listing.

Additionally, your organization is required to consider the materiality of leases for recognition of ASC 842. There are no explicit requirements (that, of course, would make things too easy!). One approach to developing a capitalization threshold for leases (e.g., the dollar amount that determines the proper financial reporting of the asset) is to use the lesser of the following: 

  • A capitalization threshold for PP&E, including ROU assets (i.e., the threshold takes into account the effect of leased assets determined in accordance with ASC 842) 
  • A recognition threshold for liabilities that considers the effect of lease liabilities determined in accordance with ASC 842

Under this approach, if a right-of-use asset is below the established capitalization threshold, it would immediately be recognized as an expense. 

It's important to keep in mind the overall disclosure objective of 842 "which is to enable users of financial statements to assess the amount, timing, and uncertainty of cash flows arising from leases". It's up to the organization to determine the level of details and emphasis needed on various disclosure requirements to satisfy the disclosure objective. With that objective in mind, significant judgment will be required to determine the level of disclosures necessary for an entity. However, simply put, the more extensive the organization's leasing activities, the more comprehensive the disclosures are expected to be. 

Don't wait, download our lease implementation organizer (Excel file) to get started today! 

Key takeaways and next steps:

  •  ASC 842 is effective for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2021
  • Establish policies and procedures for lease accounting, including a materiality threshold for assessing leases
  • Develop a system to capture data related to lease terms, estimated lease payments, and other components of lease agreements that could affect the liability and asset being reported
  • Evaluate if bond covenants or debt limits need to be modified due to implementation of this standard
  • Determine if there are below market leases/gifts-in-kind of leased assets

If you have questions about finance or operating leases, or need help with the new standard, BerryDunn has numerous resources available below and please don’t hesitate to contact the lease accounting team. We’re here to help. 

Lease accounting resources 

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Read this if you work in finance or accounting or rely on financial reporting information.

Does your financial close process provide the information you need to make educated business decisions? 

Timely reporting of financial results is key to stakeholder decision making. As a result of market and regulatory obligations, companies and organizations are confronted with increasingly strict guidelines for the delivery of timely, accurate reports. Enormous amounts of information on transactions must be processed in a limited timeframe. This requires a great deal of effort on the part of your accounting and finance teams. 

The typical financial close process can be broken down into the following segments:

While this workflow seems straightforward enough, the financial close is not a single flat process, but the combination of many interrelated and often codependent processes—each with its own stages. The closing and reporting process is complex, and involves many different data suppliers and dependencies. Think your billing department, accounts payable, cash receipt, procurement, and more. All of these areas are likely to have data inputs that go into your financial close.
 

It often ends up looking like this when you consider each task:


 
To make the situation more challenging, as companies and organizations grow, the closing process can become more onerous and take longer to complete. Tasks in the financial close process are often added to an existing process—a process that may be more reactionary and based in historical practice, and may not have been well thought-out or planned for the current environment. Adding these tasks and increasing data inputs and outputs adds additional pressure to an incredibly important, but often forgotten task: analysis.

The majority of finance departments spend the bulk of their time on the financial close itself. Unfortunately, this can lead to delays, uncovering mistakes well after the fact, and reports lagging behind current business operations. The later the analysis is performed and the reports are distributed, the less useful they become for decision making. 

Financial close optimization

The good news? There is a strategy to optimize your financial close process, called financial close optimization, or fast closing. Fast closing is the periodic and structured closing and reporting process, in which all knowledge about the financial facts is collected and distributed to stakeholders more quickly.

There is an emerging trend for more frequent financial reporting, which allows companies and organizations to be more nimble and responsive to financial results, especially when facing an unprecedented crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic. Optimizing the financial close process allows for quicker reporting of business results to give stakeholders a more timely financial picture.

We understand the scarcity of human and financial resources continues to prove challenging to financial teams. Creating a culture of continuous improvement is a challenging task for almost any finance team—but given the benefits of a fast closing and the increased costs of a longer close, is this something that can be ignored any longer?

Look out for our next article on tips and strategies to optimize your financial close, which can lead to:

  • Freeing up resources to provide finance teams more time for a deeper analysis of operating performance and other strategic objectives
  • Providing more accurate and timely reporting
  • Improving the organization’s audit readiness 
  • Lessening the need for traditional routine tasks 
  • Increasing focus on clients, patients, and customers by spending more time looking ahead to possible opportunities. 

If you have any questions on how to improve your financial close, please contact us. We’re here to help.

Article
Financial close: Increasing complexity calls for improving processes  

Read this if you are a not-for-profit organization. 

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, on June 3, 2020, FASB issued an Accounting Standards Update (ASU) that granted a one-year effective date delay for NFPs to adopt the new revenue recognition standards (Topic 606). The ASU permitted NFPs that had not yet applied the revenue recognition standard to do so for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019. Many NFP’s choose to take advantage of this delay. 

However, the clock is ticking on FASB’s revenue recognition changes, as most NFP’s will have to adopt the revenue recognition changes shortly. With that in mind – let’s revisit Topic 606 and what it could mean for your organization. 

The overarching goal of the changes to revenue recognition is to converge disparate standards across industries, all while making the information more useful to users. The core principle of the standard is that “the organization should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of goods or service in an amount that reflects the payment for which the organization expects to be entitled for those goods and services.” 

A five-step process and a simplified approach 

To achieve that core principle, your organization will need to apply a five-step model to some of your revenues streams:

  1. Identify the contract(s) with a customer
  2. Identify the separate performance obligations
  3. Determine the transaction price
  4. Allocate the transaction price to the separate performance obligations
  5. Recognize revenue when or as a performance obligation is satisfied

While the process can be broken down into five simple steps, the task of reviewing revenue streams and specific contracts can be quite daunting in implementation.

Additional disclosures needed

Whether your organization is currently implementing, or soon will, you will want to make sure you understand the extensive disclosures required under the standards. Annual disclosures include the following:

  • Qualitative information about how economic factors affect the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flow
  • Opening and closing balances of contract assets, contract liabilities, and receivables from contracts with customers
  • Descriptions of performance obligations

We are here to help

We recognize the difficult task ahead for our clients in analyzing their multiple contract vehicles and revenue streams in implementing the new standards. To help our clients through the process, we are offering revenue standard workshops. This workshop can be tailored to your needs, with an in-depth meeting to review the standard, consider your significant revenue streams, and a walkthrough the five-step process. We will leave you with an easy to use template for analyzing future revenue streams along with recommendations for your current revenue recognition system and process. 

Don’t wait until the financial year has come to a close to review your processes and systems in place, we are available now to work with you to prepare for the new standard. Contact Chris Mouradian or Sarah Belliveau to find out how you can join the list of organizations getting ahead of the new standard.

Article
Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) revenue recognition changes: What it means for NFPs

Read this if your organization has received assistance from the Provider Relief Fund.

On January 15, 2021 the US Department of Health & Human Services released updated guidance on the Provider Relief Fund (PRF) reporting requirements. Below, we outline what has changed and supersedes their last communication on November 2, 2020.

This amended guidance is in response to the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act (Act). The act was passed in December 2020 and added an additional $3 billion to the PRF along with new language regarding reporting requirements. 

Highlights

Please note this is a summary of information and additional detail and guidance that can be found on the Reporting Requirements and Auditing page at HHS.gov. See our helpful infographic for a summary of key deadlines and reporting requirements. 

  • On January 15, 2021 The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced a delay in reporting of the PRF. Further details on the deadline for this reporting have not yet been communicated by HHS. Recipients of PRF payments greater than $10,000 may register to report on use of funds as of December 31, 2020 starting January 15, 2021. Providers should go into the portal and register and establish an account now so when the portal is open for reporting they are prepared to fulfil their reporting requirements.
  • Recipients who have not used all of the funds after December 31, 2020, have six more months from January 1 – June 30, 2021 to use remaining funds. Provider organizations will have to submit a second report before July 31, 2021 on how funds were utilized for that six-month period. 
  • The new guidelines further define the reporting entity and how to report if there is a parent company with subsidiaries for both general and targeted distributions:
     
    • Parent organizations with multiple TINs that either received general distributions or received them from parent organizations can report the usage of these funds even if the parent was not the entity that completed the attestation.
    • While a targeted distribution may now be transferred from the receiving subsidiary to another subsidiary by the parent organization, the original subsidiary must report any of the targeted distribution it received that was transferred.
       
  • The calculation of lost revenue has been modified by HHS through this new guidance. Lost revenue is calculated for the full year and can be calculated as follows:
     
    1. Difference between 2019 and 2020 actual client/resident/patient care revenue. The revenue must be submitted by client/resident/patient care mix and by quarter for the 2019 year.
    2. Difference between 2020 budgeted and 2020 actual. The budget must have been established and approved prior to March 27, 2020 and this budget, as well as an attestation from the CEO or CFO that this budget was submitted and approved prior to March 27, 2020, will have to be submitted.
    3. Reasonable method of estimating revenue. An explanation of the methodology, why it is reasonable and how the lost revenue was caused by coronavirus and not another source will need to be submitted. This method will likely fall under increased scrutiny through an audit by the Health Resources & Services Administration.
       
  • Recipients with unexpended PRF funds in full after the end of calendar year 2020, have an additional six months to utilize remaining funds for expenses or lost revenue attributable to coronavirus in an amount not to exceed the difference between:
     
    • 2019 Quarter 1 to Quarter 2 and 2021 Quarter 1 to Quarter 2 actual revenue,
    • 2020 Quarter 1 to Quarter 2 budgeted revenue and 2021 Quarter 1 to Quarter 2 actual revenue.

Next steps

In the wake of this new guidance, providers should undertake the following steps:

  • Register in the HHS portal and establish an account as soon as possible.
  • Revisit lost revenue calculations to determine if current methodology is appropriate or if an updated methodology would be more appropriate under the new guidance.
  • Understand the ability to transfer general and targeted distributions and the impact on reporting of these funds.
  • Develop reporting procedures for lost revenue and increased expense for reporting in the HHS portal.

If you have questions about accounting for, or reporting on, funds that you have received as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, please contact a member of our team. We’re here to help.

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Coronavirus Response and Relief Act impacts on the HHS Provider Relief Fund

Read this if your organization receives charitable donations.

As the holiday season has passed and tax season is now upon us, we have our own list of considerations that we would like to share—so that you don’t end up on the IRS’ naughty list!

Donor acknowledgment letters

It is important for organizations receiving gifts to consider the following guidelines, as doing some work now may save you time (and maybe a fine or two) later.

Charitable (i.e., 501(c)(3)) organizations are required to provide a contemporaneous (i.e., timely) donor acknowledgment letter to all donors who contribute $250 or more to the organization, whether it be cash or non-cash items (e.g., publicly traded securities, real estate, artwork, vehicles, etc.) received. The letter should include the following:

  • Name of the organization
  • Amount of cash contribution
  • Description of non-cash items (but not the value)
  • Statement that no goods and services were provided (assuming this is the case)
  • Description and good faith estimate of the value of goods and services provided by the organization in return for the contribution

Additionally, when a donor makes a payment greater than $75 to a charitable organization partly as a contribution and partly as a payment for goods and services, a disclosure statement is required to notify the donor of the value of the goods and services received in order for the donor to determine the charitable contribution component of their payment.

If a charitable organization receives noncash donations, it may be asked to sign Form 8283. This form is required to be filed by the donor and included with their personal income tax return. If a donor contributes noncash property (excluding publicly traded securities) valued at over $5,000, the organization will need to sign Form 8283, Section B, Part IV acknowledging receipt of the noncash item(s) received.

For noncash items such as cars, boats, and even airplanes that are donated there is a separate Form 1098-C, Contributions of Motor Vehicles, Boats, and Airplanes, which the donee organization must file. A copy of the Form 1098-C is provided to the donor and acts as acknowledgment of the gift. For more information, you can read our article on donor acknowledgments.

Gifts to employees

At the same time, many employers find themselves in a giving spirit, wishing to reward the employees for another year of hard work. While this generosity is well-intended, gifts to employees can be fraught with potential tax consequences organizations should be aware of. Here’s what you need to know about the rules on employee gifts.

First and foremost, the IRS is very clear that cash and cash equivalents (specifically gift cards) are always included as taxable income when provided by the employer, regardless of amount, with no exceptions. This means that if you plan to give your employees cash or a gift card this year, the value must be included in the employees’ wages and is subject to all payroll taxes.

There are, however, a few ways to make nontaxable gifts to employees. IRS Publication 15 offers a variety of examples of de minimis (minimal) benefits, defined as any property or service you provide to an employee that has a minimal value, making the accounting for it unreasonable and administratively impracticable. Examples include holiday or birthday gifts, like flowers, or a fruit basket, or occasional tickets for theater or sporting events.

Additionally, holiday gifts can also be nontaxable if they are in the form of a gift coupon and if given for a specific item (with no redeemable cash value). A common example would be issuing a coupon to your employee for a free ham or turkey redeemable at the local grocery store. For more information, please see our article on employee gifts.

Other year-end filing requirements

As the end of the calendar year approaches, it is also important to start thinking about Form 1099 filing requirements. There are various 1099 forms; 1099-INT to report interest income, 1099-DIV to report dividend income, 1099-NEC to report nonemployee compensation, and 1099-MISC to report other miscellaneous income, to name a few.

Form 1099-NEC reports non-employment income which is not included on a W-2. Organizations must issue 1099-NECs to payees (there are some exclusions) who receive at least $600 in non-employment income during the calendar year. A non-employee may be an independent contractor, or a person hired on a contract basis to complete work, such as a graphic designer. Payments to attorneys or CPAs for services rendered that exceed $600 for the tax year must be reported on a Form 1099-NEC. However, a 1099-MISC would be sent to an Attorney for payments of settlements. For additional questions on which 1099 form to use please contact your tax advisor.

While federal income tax is not always required to be withheld, there are some instances when it is. If a payee does not furnish their Tax Identification Number (TIN) to the organization, then the organization is required to withhold taxes on payments reported in box 1 of Form 1099-NEC. There are other instances, and the rates can differ so if you have questions, please reach out to your tax advisor. 1099 forms are due to the recipient and the IRS by January 31st.

Whether organizations are receiving gifts, giving employee gifts, or thinking about acknowledgments and other reporting we hope that by making our list and checking it twice we can save you some time to spend with your loved ones this holiday season. We wish you all a very happy and healthy holiday season!

Article
Making a year-end list and checking it twice

Read this if you are a not-for-profit executive, CFO, or audit professional.

You may have heard—or tried not to—a lot about the new Current Expected Credit Loss (CECL) accounting standard1 that has consumed much of the banking industry for the past few years. While the impact to banks has snagged most of the headlines, webinars, and conference sessions, the new accounting standard applies to a broad range of financial instruments, meaning it affects a lot of companies and organizations outside the banking industry. Assessing your readiness is critical, as the standard goes into effect for all remaining organizations in 2023. 

Does CECL affect your organization? 

The first step is determining if you have any in-scope financial instruments; ASU 326-20-15-2 is the section of the new standard that identifies these assets. Please do consult the standard directly but, to briefly explain, it applies to financial assets measured at amortized cost basis, including financing receivables, held-to-maturity debt securities, trade and other receivables, net investments in leases recognized by lessors, and off-balance-sheet credit exposures for loans, letters of credit, and financial guarantees not accounted for as insurance. If your organization has any of these financial assets – receivables and leases are likely the major categories for non-banks – then you will need to ensure you comply with the requirements of the new standard. 

What’s different?

In addition to applying to many more types of financial instruments, CECL meaningfully changes the way in which reserves are calculated. First, all in-scope assets must be segmented—or grouped—by common risk-based characteristics, determined and documented by each organization. ASC 326-20-55-5 provides examples of risk characteristics that individually, or in combination, may define a segment—a few examples include financial asset type, credit score or rating, geographical location, or term.

Once you have determined your segments, there are at least seven new methods for calculating the segment-level reserve. While the methods are mentioned in the standard, we’ve compiled a brief overview of the various methods for reference.

Another key change is that all in-scope assets must be considered for reserve—even those for which the likelihood of loss is small. Regardless of which allowable method(s) you choose for your calculation, the method is based on a life-of-asset time frame, meaning that you need to estimate risk of loss over the remaining time you believe the financial asset will be on your books.

Additionally, the standard requires you consider how this risk might change given a reasonable and supportable forecast of economic conditions over that remaining life. As a result of these key new elements, any in-scope financial asset(s) for which you compute and carry a $0 reserve must be very well-documented and explained.

New required financial statement disclosures

One final note: There are some new financial statement disclosures required with CECL adoption. Beyond those, there may be other CECL-related information either you want to share, or your audit/tax firm recommends be disclosed. Consulting with your auditor at least one quarter prior to financial statement preparation will help make sure you aren’t scrambling last minute to draft new language or tables. 

No matter what stage of CECL readiness you are in, our team of experts are here to help you navigate the requirements as efficiently and effectively as possible.
 

1Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 326

Article
CECL isn't just for banks: Are you ready?

Read this if your company is considering financing through a sale leaseback.

In today’s economic climate, some companies are looking for financing alternatives to traditional senior or mezzanine debt with financial institutions. As such, more companies are considering entering into sale leaseback arrangements. Depending on your company’s situation and goals, a sale leaseback may be a good option. Before you decide, here are some advantages and disadvantages that you should consider.

What is a sale leaseback?

A sale leaseback is when a company sells an asset and simultaneously enters into a lease contract with the buyer for the same asset. This transaction can be used as a method of financing, as the company is able to retrieve cash from the sale of the asset while still being able to use the asset through the lease term. Sale leaseback arrangements can be a viable alternative to traditional financing for a company that owns significant “hard assets” and has a need for liquidity with limited borrowing capacity from traditional financial institutions, or when the company is looking to supplement its financing mix.

Below are notable advantages, disadvantages, and other considerations for companies to consider when contemplating a sale leaseback transaction:

Advantages of using a sale leaseback

Sale leasebacks may be able to help your company: 

  • Increase working capital to deploy at a greater rate of return, if opportunities exist
  • Maintain control of the asset during the lease term
  • Avoid restrictive covenants associated with traditional financing
  • Capitalize on market conditions, if the fair value of an asset has increased dramatically
  • Reduce financing fees
  • Receive sale proceeds equal to or greater than the fair value of the asset, which generally is contingent on the company’s ability to fund future lease commitments

Disadvantages of using a sale leaseback

On the other hand, a sale leaseback may:

  • Create a current tax obligation for capital gains; however, the company will be able to deduct future lease payments.
  • Cause loss of right to receive any future appreciation in the fair value of the asset
  • Cause a lack of control of the asset at the end of the lease term
  • Require long-term financial commitments with fixed payments
  • Create loss of operational flexibility (e.g., ability to move from a leased facility in the future)
  • Create a lost opportunity to diversify risk by owning the asset

Other considerations in assessing if a sale leaseback is right for you

Here are some questions you should ask before deciding if a sale leaseback is the right course of action for your company: 

  • What are the length and terms of the lease?
  • Are the owners considering a sale of the company in the near future?
  • Is the asset core to the company’s operations?
  • Is entering into the transaction fulfilling your fiduciary duty to shareholders and investors?
  • What is the volatility in the fair value of the asset?
  • Does the transaction create any other tax opportunities, obligations, or exposures?

The Financial Accounting Standards Board’s new standard on leases, Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 842, is now effective for both public and private companies. Accounting for sale leaseback transactions under ASC Topic 842 can be very complex with varying outcomes depending on the structure of the transaction. It is important to determine if a sale has occurred, based on guidance provided by ASC Topic 842, as it will determine the initial and subsequent accounting treatment.

The structure of a sale leaseback transactions can also significantly impact a company’s tax position and tax attributes. If you’re contemplating a sale leaseback transaction, reach out to our team of experts to discuss whether this is the right path for you.

Article
Is a sale leaseback transaction right for you?

Read this if you are in the senior living industry.

Happy New Year! While it may be a new calendar year, the uncertainties facing senior living facilities are still the same, and the question remains: When will the Public Health Emergency end, and how will it impact operations? Federal and state relief programs ended in 2022, and facilities are trying to find ways to fund operations as they face low occupancy levels. Inflation was at 7.1% in November and staffing remains a significant challenge. So, what can the industry expect for 2023?

Occupancy

Through the pandemic, occupancy losses were greater in nursing facilities than in assisted living (AL) and independent living (IL) facilities. This trend of care shifting away from nursing facilities had started before the onset of the pandemic. From 2018-2020, nursing facility volume decreased by over 5% while AL facilities occupancy increased by 1.1%.

Nursing facility occupancy nationwide was 80.2% in January of 2020 and declined to as low as 67.5% in January 2021. In 2022, nursing facility occupancy began to recover. As of December 18, 2022, nationwide occupancy had rebounded to 75.8%.

The assisted living and independent living markets were certainly impacted by the pandemic but not to the extent of the nursing facilities. AL and IL occupancy was reported at 80.9% in March 2021, a record low occupancy for the industry. Through the third quarter of 2022, NIC reported IL occupancy at 84.7%, which was up from 83.8% in the second quarter of 2022. AL occupancy was at 79.7%. in the third quarter of 2022. 

Providers are starting to see some positive signs with occupancy, but are reporting the recovery has been slowed by staffing shortages.

Cost of capital

The lending market is tightening for senior living providers and occupancy issues are negatively impacting facilities bottom lines. In addition, there has been significant consolidation in the banking industry. As a result, interest and related financing costs have risen. For those facilities that aren’t able to sustain their bottom lines and are failing financial covenants, lenders are being less lenient on waivers and in some cases, lenders are imposing default lending rates. 

Ziegler reports in their Winter 2022 report the lending market for senior housing is beginning to pick up. The majority of the lenders surveyed were regional banks, and reported they are offering both fixed and floating rate loans. Lenders are also reporting an increased scrutiny on labor costs coupled with looking at a facility’s ability to increase occupancy. 

Despite these challenges, analysts are still optimistic for 2023 as inflation seems to be tapering, which will hopefully lead to a stabilization of interest rates.

Staffing

Changes to five-star rating
In July 2022, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) modified the five-star rating to include Registered Nurse (RN) and administrator turnover. The new staffing rating adds new measures, including total nurse staffing hours per resident day on the weekends, the percentage of turnover for total nursing staff and RNs, and the number of administrators who have left the nursing home over a 12-month period.

Short-term this could have a negative impact on facilities ratings as they are still struggling to recruit and retain nursing staff. The American Healthcare Association has performed an analysis, and on a nationwide basis these changes resulted in the number of one-star staffed facilities rising from 17.71% to 30.89%, and the percentage of one-star overall facilities increasing from 17.70% to 22.08%.

Staffing shortages 
Much like the occupancy trend, nursing facilities faced staffing issues even before the pandemic. From 2018 to 2020, the average number of full-time employees dropped at a higher rate, 37.1%, than admissions, 15.7%. Data from the Bureau of Labor and Statistics and CMS Payroll Based Journal reporting shows nursing facilities lost 14.5% of their employees from 2019-2021 and assisted living facilities lost 7.7% over the same time period. This unprecedented loss of employment across the industry is leading to burnout and will contribute to future turnover.

This loss of full-time employees has created a ripple effect across the healthcare sector. Nursing facilities are unable to fully staff beds and have had to decline new admissions. This is causing strain on hospital systems as they are unable to place patients in post-acute facilities, creating a back log in hospitals and driving up the cost of care.

While the industry continues to experience challenges recruiting and retaining employees, the labor market is starting to swing in the favor of providers. Some healthcare sectors have recovered to pre-pandemic staffing levels. Providers are also starting to report lower utilization of contract labor.

While the industry continues to experience challenges recruiting and retaining employees, the labor market is starting to swing in the favor of providers. 

Minimum staffing requirement
CMS is expected to propose a new minimum staffing rule by early spring 2023. Federal law currently requires Medicare and Medicaid certified nursing homes provide 24-hour licensed nursing services, which are “sufficient to meet nursing needs of their residents”. CMS issued a request for information (RFI) as part of the Fiscal Year 2023 Skilled Nursing Facility Prospective Payment System Proposed Rule. CMS received over 3,000 comments with differing points of view but prevailing themes from patient advocacy groups regarded care of residents, factors impacting facilities' ability to recruit and retain staff, differing Medicaid reimbursement models, and the cost of implementing a minimum staffing requirement. In addition to the RFI, CMS launched a study that includes analysis of historical data and site visits to 75 nursing homes. 

In a study conducted by the American Healthcare Association, it is estimated an additional 58,000 to 191,000 FTEs will be needed (at a cost of approximately $11.3 billion) to meet the previously recommended 4.1 hours per patient day minimum staffing requirements.

One potential consequence of the minimum staffing requirement is higher utilization of agency staffing. Nursing facilities saw a 14.5% decrease in staffing through the pandemic and are still struggling to recruit and retain full-time staff. To meet the minimum staffing requirements, providers may need to fill open positions with temporary staffing. 

Provider Relief Funds (PRF) 

Don’t forget if you received PRF funds in excess of $10,000 between July 1 and December 31, 2021, Phase 4 reporting period opened January 1, 2023, and will close March 31, 2023.
Many of the changes to the industry brought on by the pandemic are likely to remain. Facilities who are putting a focus on their staff and working to create a positive work environment are likely to keep employees for longer.

While there are many challenges in the current environment, they were made to be met, and we are here to help. If you have any questions or would like to talk about your specific needs, please contact our senior living team. Wishing you a successful 2023.
 

Article
Status of the senior living industry: The good, the bad, and the uncertain