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New Maine Tax Portal: What you need to know

11.29.22

Read this if you are a Maine business or pay taxes in Maine.

Maine Revenue Services has created the new Maine Tax Portal, which makes paying, filing, and managing your state taxes faster, more efficient, convenient, and accessible. The portal replaces a number of outdated services and can be used for a number of tax filings, including:

  • Corporate income tax
  • Estate tax
  • Healthcare provider tax
  • Insurance premium tax
  • Withholding
  • Sales and use tax
  • Service provider tax
  • Pass-through entity withholding
  • BETR

The Maine Tax Portal is being rolled out in four phases, with two of the four phases already completed. Most tax filings for both businesses and individuals are now available. A complete listing can be found on maine.gov. Instructional videos and FAQs can also be found on this site.

In an effort to educate businesses and individuals on the use of the new portal, Maine Revenue Services has been hosting various training sessions. The upcoming schedule can be found on maine.gov

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BerryDunn experts and consultants

Read this if you are a care provider that receives Medicaid Waiver Payments.

The IRS has recently issued guidance related to the taxability of certain payments to individual care providers of eligible individuals under a state Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services waiver program described in section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act (Medicaid Waiver Payments). Such payments, treated as difficulty of care payments, are excludable from gross income for federal income tax purposes under section 131 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Notice 2014-7, issued on January 3, 2014, provided guidance that deemed the difficulty of care payments as not subject to federal income tax. However, the notice was silent regarding implications related to employment taxes, specifically FICA and FUTA. Additional guidance issued in the fall of 2022 concludes that difficulty of care payments are subject to FICA and FUTA taxes unless an exemption applies.

Generally, if a service provider receiving difficulty of care payments is an employee of the organization providing the payments, then such payments will be considered wages subject only to FICA withholding (but not income tax), and FUTA will be assessed on those wages. If the service provider is an independent contractor, then the organization does not have any withholding obligations and does not need to prepare a Form 1099.

More information on Medicaid Waiver Payments can be found at Certain Medicaid Waiver Payments May Be Excludable From Income | Internal Revenue Service.

If you have any questions on these payments or your specific situation, please contact our Not-for-profit Tax team. We’re here to help.

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Difficulty of care payments and employment taxes

Read this if you are a not-for-profit organization in New Hampshire.

The New Hampshire Legislature has enacted a law that increases the revenue, gains, and support threshold to $2,000,000. This change applies to all charitable organizations with a fiscal year ending after August 6, 2022.

Under the old law, charitable organizations with revenue, gains, and other support totaling $1,000,000 or more were required to file audited financial statements prepared in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) along with their Annual Reports and Forms 990.

Understand the requirements and revised audit threshold

Charitable organizations with revenue, gains, and other support of $2,000,000 or more will now be required to file with the Charitable Trusts Unit audited financial statements, along with their Form 990 and annual report. 

Charitable organizations with revenue, gains, and other support between $500,000 and $1,999,999 will be required to submit, with their Form 990 and annual report, a set of financial statements prepared in accordance with GAAP that may or may not be prepared by a certified public accountant.

Please note: the financial statement requirements outlined above do not pertain to private foundations.

Access the new forms

The New Hampshire Attorney General recently adopted new rules applicable to all charitable trusts, including charitable organizations and professional fundraisers. These changes include the adoption of new paper and online forms.

Effective October 7, 2022, the Charitable Trusts Unit of the New Hampshire Attorney General’s office can only accept forms submitted electronically through its website or paper forms with the date “September 2022.”

The acceptable forms are available here. Previous versions of these forms will no longer be accepted. Please contact our not-for-profit tax team if you have any questions about your specific situation. We’re here to help.

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Major changes to 2022 Charitable Trusts Unit filings: new rules now in effect

Read this if you file taxes with the IRS for yourself or other individuals.

To protect yourself from identity thieves filing fraudulent tax returns in your name, the IRS recommends using Identity Protection PINs. Available to anyone who can verify their identity online, by phone, or in person, these PINs provide extra security against tax fraud related to stolen social security numbers of Tax ID numbers.

According to the Security Summit—a group of experts from the IRS, state tax agencies, and the US tax industry—the IP PIN is the number one security tool currently available to taxpayers from the IRS.

The simplest way to obtain a PIN is on the IRS website’s Get an IP PIN page. There, you can create an account or log in to your existing IRS account and verify your identity by uploading an identity document such as a driver’s license, state ID, or passport. Then, you must take a “selfie” with your phone or your computer’s webcam as the final step in the verification process.

Important things to know about the IRS IP PIN:

  • You must set up the IP PIN yourself; your tax professional cannot set one up on your behalf.
  • Once set up, you should only share the PIN with your trusted tax prep provider.
  • The IP PIN is valid for one calendar year; you must obtain a new IP PIN each year.
  • The IRS will never call, email or text a request for the IP PIN.
  • The 6-digit IP PIN should be entered onto your electronic tax return when prompted by the software product or onto a paper return next to the signature line.

If you cannot verify your identity online, you have options:

  • Taxpayers with an income of $72,000 or less who are unable to verify their identity online can obtain an IP PIN for the next filing season by filing Form 15227. The IRS will validate the taxpayer’s identity through a phone call.
  • Those with an income more than $72,000, or any taxpayer who cannot verify their identity online or by phone, can make an appointment at a Taxpayer Assistance Center and bring a photo ID and an additional identity document to validate their identity. They’ll then receive the IP PIN by US mail within three weeks.
  • For more information about IRS Identity Protection PINs and to get your IP PIN online, visit the IRS website.

If you have questions about your specific situation, please contact our Tax Consulting and Compliance team. We’re here to help.

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The IRS Identity Protection PIN: What is it and why do you need one?

Read this if you are a tax-exempt organization.

The IRS recently issued proposed regulations (REG-106864-18) related to Internal Revenue Code Section 512(a)(6), which requires tax-exempt entities to calculate unrelated business taxable income (UBTI) separately for each unrelated trade or business carried on by the organization.

For years beginning after December 31, 2017, exempt organizations with more than one unrelated trade or business are no longer permitted to aggregate income and deductions from all unrelated trades or businesses when calculating UBTI. In August 2018, the IRS issued Notice 2018-67, which discussed and solicited comments regarding various issues arising under Code Section 512(a)(6) and set forth interim guidance and transition rules relating to that section. 

The good news
The new proposed regulations expand upon Notice 2018-67 and provide for the following:

  • An exempt organization would identify each of its separate unrelated trades or businesses using the first two digits of the NAICS code that most accurately describes the trade or business. Activities in different geographic areas may be aggregated.
  • The total UBTI of an organization with more than one unrelated trade or business would be the sum of the UBTI computed with respect to each separate unrelated trade or business (subject to the limitation that UBTI with respect to any separate unrelated trade or business cannot be less than zero). 
  • An exempt organization with more than one unrelated trade or business would determine the NOL deduction allowed separately with respect to each of its unrelated trades or businesses.
  • An organization with losses arising in a tax year beginning before January 1, 2018 (pre-2018 NOLs), and with losses arising in a tax year beginning after December 31, 2017 (post-2017 NOLs), would deduct its pre-2018 NOLs from total UBTI before deducting any post-2017 NOLs with regard to a separate unrelated trade or business against the UBTI from such trade or business. 
  • An organization's investment activities would be treated collectively as a separate unrelated trade or business. In general, an organization's investment activities would be limited to its:
     
    1. Qualifying partnership interests
    2. Qualifying S corporation interests
    3. Debt-financed property or properties 

Organizations described in Code Sec. 501(c)(3) are classified as publicly supported charities if they meet certain support tests. The proposed regulations would permit an organization with more than one unrelated trade or business to aggregate its net income and net losses from all of its unrelated business activities for purposes of determining whether the organization is publicly supported. 

The missing news: Unaddressed items from the new guidance
With the changes provided by these proposed regulations we anticipate less complexity and lower compliance costs in applying Code Section 512(a)(6). While this new guidance is considered taxpayer friendly, the IRS still has more work to do. Items not yet addressed include:

  • Allocation of expenses among unrelated trade or businesses and between exempt and non-exempt activities.
  • The ordering rules for applying charitable deductions and NOLs.
  • Net operating losses as changed under the CARES Act.

The IRS is requesting comments on numerous key situations. Until the regulations are finalized, organizations can rely on either these proposed regulations, Notice 2018-67, or a reasonable good-faith interpretation of Code Sections 511-514 considering all the facts and circumstances.
We will keep you informed with the latest developments.

If you have any questions, please contact the not-for-profit consulting team

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IRS unrelated business taxable income update: The good news and the missing news

Did you know that there was more than a 40% increase (from $4.3 billion to $6.0 billion) in civil penalties assessed by the IRS regarding employment tax, for the 2016 fiscal year?

A recent report from the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration calls for more cases to involve criminal investigation by the Department of Justice. This is significant because the requirements needed to prove a civil violation under Sec. 6672 are nearly identical to the requirements of a criminal violation under Sec. 7202, and a criminal violation can result, among other penalties, in imprisonment for up to five years.

The issue of employment taxes encompasses all businesses, even tax-exempt entities. For fiscal year 2016, employment tax issues were involved in over 26% of audits of exempt organizations. One main reason why employment tax is a major issue? Its role in funding our government: employment taxes make up $2.3 trillion dollars (70%) of the $3.3 trillion dollars collected by the IRS for fiscal year 2016.

And noncompliance is a major issue, with roughly $45.6 billion of unemployment taxes, interest and penalties still owed to the IRS as of December 2015. This trend of increasing noncompliance, combined with the vital role employment taxes has in funding our government helps explain why the IRS has increased focus and enforcement in this area.

Should your independent contractor truly be an employee? Did you properly report fringe benefits as taxable income to the individuals who received them? Knowing the answers to these questions can help you stay in compliance with the law. If you have any questions about your employment tax situation, or how we can help you ensure compliance on this and other tax issues, please contact your BerryDunn tax advisor.
 

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The IRS cares about employment tax—why you should too.

Many of my hospital clients have an increased incidence of providing temporary housing for locums, temps and some employees and, as a result, have questions regarding the proper tax reporting to these individuals.   

First things first: the employment status of the individual needs to be determined before anything else.

If the person is an independent contractor (for example, a locum paid through an agency), a Form 1099-Misc usually needs to be filed for payments made to the individual (or agency) of $600 or more. A 1099-Misc is not required in the following circumstances:

  • The payment is made to a corporation or a tax-exempt organization.
  • Payments for travel reimbursement are excluded as long as they are paid under an accountable plan (which itself can be another topic for a blog). For example, an independent contractor submits a timely expense report to you with their lodging receipts for reimbursement. The amounts for the expense reimbursement do not have to be included on the 1099-Misc. If you pay the travel expenses directly or provide the housing, you also do not have to include these payments on the 1099-Misc.

If the individual is an employee, you should follow the guidance in IRS Publication 15-B, which can be found on www.irs.gov.

The basic rule of thumb is that every fringe benefit provided to an employee is a taxable benefit unless there is an exclusion listed in Publication 15-B.

The lodging exclusion begins on page 15 (of the 2016 publication), and there is an example regarding a hospital listed near the bottom of that page in the left column. For lodging to meet the exclusion, it must pass three tests:

  1. The lodging must be furnished on your business premises. I’ve seen some guidance that allowed the exclusion when the lodging was in close proximity to the business premise (within a mile, etc.).
     
  2. The lodging is furnished for the employer’s convenience. The employer furnishing the lodging to the employee must have a substantial business reason for doing so other than to provide the employee with additional pay. For example, the employee is on call for emergencies 4 or 5 days a week, so must live in close proximity to the hospital.
     
  3. The employee must accept the lodging as a condition of employment. The employer must require the employee to accept the lodging because they need to live on your business premises to be able to properly perform their duties. We recommend including this condition of employment directly in the employee’s written employment contract.

If lodging does not meet all three of these tests, then it must be treated as a taxable fringe benefit with the appropriate payroll taxes withheld from the employee’s pay.

If you are also providing meals, the discussion on employer-provided meals also begins on page 15 of Publication 15-B, with the discussion for meals provided on your business premises starting on page 16.

A discussion related to transportation benefits begins on page 18. We have also had some questions from clients regarding transportation. For example, one client had an employee who dropped down to part-time status and moved from Maine to Florida. The employee agreed to continue working at the hospital one week a month, and the hospital agreed to pay for the flight back and forth. The individual continued to be treated as an employee. The flight is the employee’s commuting expense, and there is no exclusion for reimbursement of commuting expenses. Therefore, the flights had to be included in the employee’s compensation and reported on his W-2.

Many of these taxable benefits are being paid through an accounts payable system rather than payroll, and so can be easily missed. Withholding for these benefits at each pay period is much easier to accomplish rather than all at once at year end. It’s important for your HR department to communicate with the payroll office whenever unusual employment terms and benefits are being offered to employees to ensure proper tax treatment.

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When it comes to temporary housing for hospital employees, IRS publication 15-B can be your friend

Read this if you work for a healthcare organization that serves uninsured or self-pay patients.

The No Surprises Act was passed in 2020 as part of a COVID relief package, with the goal of reducing surprise bills for patients who received medical or surgical services. One part of the act requires healthcare facilities and providers to give Good Faith Estimates (GFEs) to uninsured and self-pay patients starting on January 1, 2022. Read on for frequently asked questions about this topic, an update for 2023, and resources where you can find more information.

Frequently asked questions about good faith estimates for healthcare

What is a good faith estimate?

A Good Faith Estimate (GFE) is a document provided to a patient that details the expected charges for healthcare services provided. It is not a bill.

Who needs to provide GFEs, and to whom?

At this time, GFEs need to be provided to uninsured and self-pay patients. 

The following healthcare facilities must comply:

  • Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs)
  • FQHC Look-Alikes
  • Tribal/Urban Indian Health Centers
  • Rural Health Clinics (RHCs)
  • Hospitals
  • Hospital outpatient departments
  • Critical access hospitals
  • Title X Family Planning Clinics
  • Health care providers who serve uninsured and self-pay patients

How should information about the GFE process be communicated to uninsured and self-pay individuals?

Information about the availability of GFEs for uninsured or self-pay individuals must be:

  • Written in a clear and understandable manner and prominently displayed:
  • On the facility’s website and easily searchable from a public search engine
  • In the office (such as in the patient waiting room), and
  • Onsite where scheduling or questions about the cost of items or services occur, such as at the registration or check-out areas
  • Explained verbally when scheduling an item or service or when questions about the cost of items or services occur
  • Made available in accessible formats, and in the languages spoken by individuals considering or scheduling items or services

How does the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) define uninsured and self-pay individuals?

HHS has a two-fold definition:

  • Individuals who have no health insurance coverage
  • Individuals who do have health insurance coverage, but do not want to have a claim submitted to their insurer

Both of these groups of individuals must receive a GFE.

What content is required in a GFE?

A GFE must include the following:

Patient information

  • The patient’s name and date of birth

Services estimated

  • A description of the primary item or service in clear and understandable language and, if applicable, the date the primary item or service is scheduled
  • A list of items or services reasonably expected to be furnished for the primary item or service

Information about services, providers, and estimated charges

  • Applicable diagnosis codes, expected service codes, and expected charges associated with each listed item or service
  • The name, National Provider Identifier, and Tax Identification Number of each provider or facility represented in the GFE, and the State and office of the facility’s location where the items are services are expected to be provided
  • Lists of items or services that the provider or facility anticipates will require separate scheduling and that are expected to occur before or following the expected period of care for the primary item or service. (A disclaimer should state that separate GFEs will be issued upon scheduling or upon request of the listed items or services.)

Disclaimers

  • A disclaimer that there may be additional items or services that the provider or facility recommends as part of the course of care that must be scheduled or requested separately and are not included in the GFE
  • A disclaimer that the information provided in the GFE is only an estimate and that actual items, services, or charges may differ from the GFE
  • A disclaimer that the individual has a right to initiate the patient-provider dispute resolution process if the actual billed charges are substantially in excess of the expected charges included in the GFE.
  • “Substantially in excess” is defined as at least $400 more than the total amount of expected charges.
  • This disclaimer must include instructions about where an uninsured or self-pay individual can find information about how to initiate the patient-provider dispute resolution process and state that the initiation of the patient-provider dispute resolution process will not adversely affect the quality of health care services that are furnished.
  • HHS strongly encourages providers and facilities to include an email address and telephone number for someone within the provider’s or facility’s office that has the authority to represent the provider or facility in a billing dispute.
  • A disclaimer that a GFE is not a contract and does not require the uninsured or self-pay individual to obtain the items or services identified in the GFE.

HHS encourages sliding fee discount providers and facilities to include information about the provider’s or facility’s sliding fee schedule and any other financial protections that it offers. Sliding fee discount providers and facilities have flexibility to determine how best to demonstrate the expected charges associated with each listed item or service, and to determine what additional information to include, if any.

What are the required methods for providing a GFE?

A GFE must be provided in written form either on paper or electronically, based on the individual’s requested method of delivery and within the required time frames. GFEs that are provided electronically must be provided in a manner that the individual can both save and print. A GFE must be written using clear and understandable language that can be understood by the average uninsured or self-pay individual.

If the individual requests a GFE in a method other than on paper or electronically (such as by telephone or verbally in person), the provider or facility may verbally inform the individual of the information contained in the GFE. However, the provider or facility must also issue the GFE in written form.

What is the timeline for providing a GFE?

When providing a GFE to an uninsured or self-pay patient, the following time frames must be followed.

When the service is scheduled: When the GFE must be provided:
If scheduled at least 3 business days prior to the date that the item or service will be furnished Not later than 1 business day after the date of scheduling
If scheduled at least 10 business days prior to the date that the item or service will be furnished Not later than 3 business days after the date of scheduling

Please note, when a GFE is requested by an uninsured or self-pay patient, a GFE must be provided not later than 3 business days after the date of the request.

How long should a provider or facility retain a copy of GFEs?

A GFE is considered part of the patient’s medical record and must be maintained in the same manner. At the request of an uninsured or self-pay individual, the provider or facility must provide a copy of any previously issued GFE within the last six years.

Update for 2023

  • As of the start of 2023, all of the preceding requirements remain in place.
  • As of January 1, 2023, HHS has paused enforcement on the next phase of GFE implementation

The next phase of GFE implementation, which began on January 1, 2023, requires that GFEs for uninsured and self-pay patients include expected charges from co-providers or co-facilities that are part of an episode of care for a patient coordinated by a provider or facility. However, on December 2, 2022, HHS paused its enforcement of this requirement based on comments it received during the rulemaking process indicating that compliance with this provision was likely not possible by January 1, 2023.

HHS is extending enforcement discretion, pending future rulemaking, for situations where GFEs for uninsured or self-pay individuals do not include expected charges from co-providers or co-facilities. We will provide an update when HHS issues any communication about changes to GFE-related enforcement.

Helpful resources for FQHC, RHCs, and other healthcare facilities

If you have questions about the information provided in this article or are interested in an external review of your healthcare facility’s compliance with current GFE requirements, please contact Robyn Hoffmann or Mary Dowes.

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Healthcare Good Faith Estimates (GFEs): Updates for 2023

Read this if you are a provider who works with MaineCare and files an annual cost report.

Each year the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Division of Audit releases updated MaineCare cost report templates in Excel format. In the most recent revision of the templates, DHHS has made some significant changes that providers should be aware of when preparing to file their cost reports. We’ve highlighted them here. 

  • Supplemental Payments (Schedule GG)—DHHS has updated the format of Schedule GG to a new simplified form where providers no longer need to report expenses in each individual cost center, but rather will only need to identify the total expense in each component (i.e., direct, fixed, routine, and PCS for Residential Care Facilities (RCF) Appendix C). DHHS has designated specific cost centers for each offset in each component. In addition, there are now multiple Schedule GGs, including a separate schedule for each level of service within each template. Each level of service must complete one schedule for the payments received in the first round (September and October 2021) and a second to reflect the payments received in the second round (August 2022). Each Schedule GG includes a line to report supplemental payments earned in a prior period and a reconciliation of any amounts unearned.
    • For providers who have already filed their 2022 cost reports and wish to adjust their Schedule GG, they can refile just Schedule GG on the simplified form. An entire updated cost report is not necessary or suggested as the Division of Audit will incorporate the updated Schedule GG at the time of audit. This also applies to any providers wishing to amend and refile their 2021 Schedule GG. 
  • RCF High MaineCare Utilization (HMU)—Effective 7/1/2022, HMU is a new component of the RCF rate pursuant to 2022 P.L. Ch. 635. The new HMU payment required DHHS to update the cost report forms to include a settlement of these payments. As such, DHHS has added a new schedule, Schedule HH, to all RCF Appendix C, including multi-level cost reports that report HMU earned. In addition, a table was added to the bottom of Schedule L-R&B to calculate the payments received. The payments received flows to Schedule HH, where a settlement is calculated that flows to the RCF room and board settlement page. 
  • Minimum Occupancy Penalty—Per the Office of MaineCare Services News Release from November 15, 2022, the Office of MaineCare Services is temporarily waiving the minimum occupancy penalty for nursing facilities (NF), found in Chapter III, Section 67, principle 18.9, through the end of the federal Public Health Emergency (PHE). Additionally, DHHS is temporarily waiving the minimum occupancy penalty for RCF, Private Non-Medical Institution (PNMI) Appendix C facilities, found in DHHS Rule Chapter 115, principle 34.3, through the end of the federal PHE. In order to accommodate this within the cost report, the penalty calculation has been removed from Schedule G (NF), Schedule X (multi-level), and Schedule A (RCF free-standing). 
  • Revenue—DHHS also added a new schedule, Schedule D (B-1 on the ICF template), which is a summary of revenue by payor.

There were also some minor changes made last summer including:

  • Schedule F & R (NF), Schedule E (RCF/PNMI), and Schedule B (Intermediate Care Facilities (ICF))—Added a new cost center to the fixed costs section for “COVID Staff Universal & Surveillance Testing.” 
  • Schedule B (NF)—Added a Direct Care add-on column for the AAAA add-on (125% of minimum wage) based on updated rate letters. 
  • Schedule E (NF)—Removed the median question due to LD 684. There is now no need to be under the medians to qualify for ultra-high MaineCare utilization (over 80% utilization). 
  • Schedule J (NF and ICF), Schedule L-PNMI (RCF/PNMI), and Schedule B (Appendix F)—Updated wording from TRI (temporary rate increase) to ECA (extraordinary circumstances allowance) funding.

Cost reports must be submitted in Excel format and DHHS is no longer accepting locked or protected cost report files or files that have hidden tabs. Cost reports and supporting documentation should be filed using MOVEit. If you have not established an account with DHHS yet for MOVEit, please reach out to Lucas Allen, Manager of Data Analytics

Please note the following specifications for online submission to MOVEit:

  • Each filename will need to contain: facility/agency name, four-digit year, what the document relates to, and what the document is (i.e., cost report).
  • Files cannot be a zipped file.
  • Files cannot be password protected or restricted in any way.
  • No folders are to be uploaded.
  • It is recommended that supporting documentation be combined into one PDF document with appropriate bookmarks for each supporting document, but this is not a requirement. If the supporting documentation is not in one PDF file, label all files with the facility/agency name, four-digit year, and what the document is.
  • Files need to be in one of the following formats: Microsoft product or Adobe PDF to ensure it is machine readable.

As a reminder, when submitting your cost report and supporting documentation:

  • Complete all schedules in the cost report. If a specific schedule does not apply to your facility, mark “N/A” on the schedule.  
  • Do not alter the schedules in the cost report.  
  • Submit a completed cost report checklist, and place a checkmark for each section that applies to your facility or “N/A” for any section that does not apply.  
  • Submit all supporting documentation identified on the checklist in an acceptable format (Microsoft product or Adobe PDF).

If you have any questions on these changes or would like to talk about your specific needs, please contact our senior living team. We are here to help.

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MaineCare cost report templates: What providers should know about the current year changes