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Three paths to organizational
self-care
for state public health agency survival

11.11.20

The American Public Health Association annual conference’s thematic focus on preventing violence provided an illustration of the extent of the overwhelming demands on state public health agencies right now. Not only do you need to face the daily challenges of responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, you also need to address ongoing, complex issues like violence prevention.

The sheer breadth of sessions available at APHA shows the broad scope of public health’s reach and the need for multi-level, multi-sector interventions, all with a shrinking public health workforce. The conference’s sessions painted clear pictures of the critical public health issues our country currently faces, but did not showcase many solutions, perhaps leaving state health agency leaders wondering how to tackle these taxing demands coming from every direction with no end in sight.

BerryDunn has a suggestion: practice organizational self-care! It might seem antithetical to focus maxed-out resources on strengthening systems and infrastructure right now, but state public health agencies have little choice. You have to be healthy yourself in order to effectively protect the public’s health. Organizational health is driven by high-functioning systems, from disease surveillance and case investigation to performance management, and quality improvement to data-informed decision-making.  

State health agencies can use COVID-19 funding to support organizational self-care, prioritizing three areas: workforce, technology, and processes. Leveraging this funding to build organizational capacity can increase human resources, replace legacy data systems, and purchase equipment and supplies. 

  1. Funding new positions with COVID sources can create upward paths for existing staff as well as expanding the workforce
  2. Assessing the current functioning of public health data systems identifies and clarifies gaps that can be addressed by adopting new technology platforms, which can also be done with COVID funding.
  3. Examining the processes used for major functions like surveillance or case investigation can eliminate unproductive steps and introduce efficiencies. 

So what now? Where to start? BerryDunn brings expertise in process analysis and redesign, an accreditation readiness tool, and an approach to data systems planning and procurement―all of which are paths forward toward organizational self-care. 

  1. Process analysis and redesign can be applied to data systems or other areas of focus to prioritize incremental changes. Conduct process redesign on a broad or narrow scale to improve efficiency and effectiveness of your projects. 

  2. Accreditation readiness provides a lens to examine state health agency operations against best practices to focus development in areas with the most significant gaps. Evaluate gaps in your agency’s readiness for Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) review and track every piece of documentation needed to meet PHAB standards.
  3. Data system planning and procurement assistance incorporates process analysis to assess your current system functioning, define your desired future state, and address the gaps, and then find, source, and implement faster, more effective systems. 

Pursuing any of these three paths allows state health agency leaders to engage in organizational self-care in a realistic, productive manner so that the agency can meet the seemingly unceasing demands for public health action now and into the future.

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Truly effective preventive health interventions require starting early, as evidenced by the large body of research and the growing federal focus on the role of Medicaid in addressing Social Determinants of Health (SDoH) and Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs).

Focusing on early identification of SDoH and ACEs, CMS recently announced its Integrated Care for Kids (InCK) model and will release the related Notice of Funding Opportunity this fall.

CMS describes InCK as a child-centered approach that uses community-based service delivery and alternative payment models (APMs) to improve and expand early identification, prevention, and treatment of priority health concerns, including behavioral health issues. The model’s goals are to improve child health, reduce avoidable inpatient stays and out-of-home placement, and create sustainable APMs. Such APMs would align payment with care quality and support provider/payer accountability for improved child health outcomes by using care coordination, case management, and mobile crisis response and stabilization services.

State Medicaid agencies have many things to consider when evaluating this funding opportunity. Building on current efforts and innovations, building or leveraging strong partnerships with community organizations, incentivizing evidence-based interventions, and creating risk stratification of the target population are critical parts of the InCK model. Here are three additional areas to consider:

1. Data. States will need information for early identification of children in the target population. State agencies?like housing, justice, child welfare, education, and public health have this information?and external organizations—such as childcare, faith-based, and recreation groups—are also good sources of early identification. It is immensely complicated to access data from these disparate sources. State Medicaid agencies will be required to support local implementation by providing population-level data for the targeted geographic service area.

  • Data collection challenges include a lack of standardized measures for SDoH and ACEs, common data field definitions, or consistent approaches to data classification; security and privacy of protected health information; and IT development costs.
  • Data-sharing agreements with internal and external sources will be critical for state Medicaid agencies to develop, while remaining mindful of protected health information regulations.
  • Once data-sharing agreements are in place, these disparate data sources, with differing file structures and nomenclature, will require integration. The integrated data must then be able to identify and risk-stratify the target population.

For any evaluative approach or any APM to be effective, clear quality and outcome measures must be developed and adopted across all relevant partner organizations.

2. Eligibility. Reliable, integrated eligibility and enrollment systems are crucial points of identification and make it easier to connect to needed services.

  • Applicants for one-benefit programs should be screened for eligibility for all programs they may need to achieve positive health outcomes.
  • Any agency at which potential beneficiaries appear should also have enrollment capability, so it is easier to access services.

3. Payment models. State Medicaid agencies may cover case management services and/or targeted case management as well as health homes; leverage Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) services; and modify managed care organization contract language to encourage, incent, and in some cases, require services related to the InCK model and SDoH. Value-based payment models, already under exploration in numerous states, include four basic approaches:

  • Pay for performance—provider payments are tied directly to specific quality or efficiency indicators, including health outcomes under the provider organization’s control. 
  • Shared savings/risk—some portion of the organization’s compensation depends on the managed care entity achieving cost savings for the targeted patient population, while realizing specific health outcomes or quality improvement.
  • Pay for success—payment is dependent upon achieving desired outcomes rather than underlying services.
  • Capitated or bundled payments—managed care entities pay an upfront per member per month lump sum payment to an organization for community care coordination activities and link that with fee-for-service reimbursement for delivering value-added services.

By focusing on upstream prevention, comprehensive service delivery, and alternative payment models, the InCK model is a promising vehicle to positively impact children’s health. Though its components require significant thought, strategy, coordination, and commitment from state Medicaid agencies and partners, there are early innovators providing helpful examples and entities with vast Section 1115 waiver development and Medicaid innovation experience available to assist.

As state Medicaid agencies develop and implement primary and secondary prevention, cost savings can be achieved while meaningful improvements are made in children’s lives.

Article
Three factors state medicaid agencies should consider when applying for InCK funding

Is your state Medicaid agency considering a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Section 1115 Waiver to fight the opioid epidemic in your state? States want the waiver because it provides flexibility to test different approaches to finance and deliver Medicaid services. The skyrocketing prevalence of substance use disorders nationwide calls for such flexibility and innovation to expand existing services for treatment and recovery. Although applying for an 1115 waiver can be daunting, here are some guidelines to help you succeed with implementation.

Be pragmatic
Be honest and pragmatic in planning discussions for the essential resources you need to have in place for a successful implementation. Ask yourselves who and how many people you need to involve to develop and execute each stage. Plan enough time to develop policies and agency protocols, make sure you have the right providers for your members, set provider rates, and then train the providers.

Ask hard questions
Once you identify key requirements to address first in your waiver, ask yourself what elements need to be in place to meet these requirements. Here are elements to consider and questions to answer:

  • Fee-for-service and managed care organization (MCO) rates — new services, such as adult residential treatment services aligned with care standards (e.g., American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM®) levels), may require changes to reimbursement rates. What needs to happen to develop new rates? What obstacles do you anticipate and how will you overcome them?
  • Care standards (e.g., ASAM® levels of care) and training your providers — consider what the levels mean given the range of providers in your state and the services your members receive. What is required to move to these standards? How you will work with providers to ensure adherence, including certification and training? What will this cost?
  • Policy changes — your state’s Medicaid agency will need to revamp and create policies to cover the service expansion and other changes. How will you complete all necessary policy and protocol changes early enough to inform MCO and provider actions?
  • MCO provider network adequacy — it’s worth investing the time in your application development to assess whether the MCOs serving Medicaid recipients in your state have the right mix of providers to ensure that you can fully implement the new service structure. How long should you give the MCOs for network expansion or recruitment?
  • MCO care coordination guidelines — each MCO will have its own approach. How are you going to ensure adherence to your waiver’s vision of care coordination?
  • Indicators — how will you evaluate the success of your program? How will you collect and analyze data? The earlier you determine how you will evaluate your program, the easier it will be to report on, and make improvements.

Get started
Applying for and implementing an SUD 1115 waiver is a complex and time-consuming process — but by dedicating the time up front to address the many details of time and resources, you’ll find implementation to be far smoother, and effective treatment and recovery services provided sooner for those who need it most. Our Medicaid team is here to help.

Article
Building a Strong Substance Use Disorder (SUD) 1115 waiver demonstration

What the C-Suite should know about CECL and change management

Read this if you are at a financial institution. 

Some institutions are managing CECL implementation as a significant enterprise project, while others have assigned it to just one or two people. While these approaches may yield technical compliance, leadership may find they fail to realize any strategic benefits. In this article, Dan Vogt, Principal in BerryDunn’s Management and IT Consulting Practice, and Susan Weber, Senior Manager and CECL expert in BerryDunn’s Financial Services Practice, outline key actions leaders can take now to ensure CECL adoption success.  

Call it empathy, or just the need to take a break from the tactical and check in on the human experience, but on a recent call, I paused the typical readiness questions to ask, “How’s the mood around CECL adoption – what’s it been like getting others in the organization involved?” The three-word reply was simple, but powerful: “Kicking and screaming.”  

Earlier this year, by a vote of 5-2, the FASB (Financial Accounting Standards Board) closed the door to any further delays to CECL adoption, citing an overarching need to unify the industry under one standard. FASB’s decision also mercifully ended the on-again off-again cycle that has characterized CECL preparation efforts since early 2020. One might think the decision would have resulted in relief. But with so much change in the world over the past few years, is it any wonder institutions are instead feeling change-saturated?  

Organizational change

CECL has been heralded as the most significant change to bank accounting ever, replacing 40+ years of accounting and regulatory oversight practices. But the new standard does much more than that. Implementing CECL has an effect on everything from executive and board strategic discussions to interdepartmental workflows, systems, and controls. The introduction of new methods, data elements, and financial assets has helped usher in new software, processes, and responsibilities that directly affect the work of many people in the organization. CECL isn’t just accounting—it’s organizational change. 

Change management

Change management best practices often focus on leading from optimism—typically leadership and an executive sponsor talk about opportunities and the business reasons for change. Some examples of what this might sound like as it relates to CECL might include, by converting to lifetime loss expectations, the institution will be better prepared to weather economic downturns; or, by evolving data and modeling precision, an institution’s understanding and measure of credit risk is enhanced, resulting in more strategic growth, pricing, and risk management. 

But leading from optimism is sometimes hard to do because it isn’t always motivating—especially when the change is mandated rather than chosen.  

Perhaps a more judiciously used tactic is to focus on the risk, or potential penalty, of not changing. In the case of CECL, examples might include, your external auditor not being able to sign-off on your financials (or significant delays in doing so), regulatory criticism, inefficient/ineffective processes, control issues, tired and frustrated staff. These examples expose the institution to all kinds of key risks: compliance, operational, strategic, and reputational, among them.

CECL success and change management

With so much riding on CECL implementation and adoption going well, some organizations may be at heightened risk simply because the effort is being compartmentalized—isolated within a department, or assigned to only one or two people. How effectively leadership connects CECL implementation with tenets of change management, how quickly they understand, then together embrace, promote, and facilitate the related changes affecting people and their work, may prove to be the key factor in achieving success beyond compliance.  

One important step leaders can take is to perform an impact assessment to understand who in the organization is being affected by the transition to CECL, and how. An example of this is below. Identifying the departments and functions that will need to be changed or updated with CECL adoption might expose critical overlaps and reveal important new or enhanced collaborations. Adding in the number of people represented by each group gives leaders insight into the extent of the impact across the institution. By better understanding how these different groups are affected, leaders can work together to more effectively prioritize, identify and remove roadblocks, and support peoples’ efforts longer term.           

 
No matter where your institution is currently in its CECL implementation journey, it is not too late to course-correct. Leadership—unified in priority, message, and understanding—can achieve the type of success that produces efficient sustainable practices, and increases employee resilience and engagement.

For more information, visit the CECL page on our website. If you would like specific answers to questions about your CECL implementation, please visit our Ask the Advisor page to submit your questions. For more tips on documenting your CECL adoption, stay tuned for our next article in the series, revisit past articles, or tune in to our CECL Radio podcast. You can also follow Susan Weber on LinkedIn.

Article
Implementing CECL: Kicking and screaming

Read this if your organization offers health insurance through a health insurance exchange.

When the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed in 2010, it contained a known gap which made healthcare premiums unaffordable for some families covered under Medicare or employer-sponsored health insurance plans. The gap in the law, commonly referred to as the family glitch, was formalized in 2013 as the result of a Final Rule issued by the IRS. 

The “family glitch” calculates the affordability of an employer-sponsored health insurance plan based on the cost for the employee, not additional family members. An article published in April 2022 on healthinsurance.org estimated that the cost of health insurance for a family covered by an employer-sponsored plan could end up being 25% or more of the household’s income, even if the plan was considered affordable (less than 9.61% of the household’s income) for the employee alone. Almost half of the people impacted by the family glitch are children.

The family glitch was allowed to stand in 2013 partly because of concerns that resolving the issue could push more people off employer-sponsored plans and onto marketplace qualified health plans, ultimately raising the cost of subsidies. Since then, several attempts have been made to fix the issue, which affects around five million Americans. The most recent attempt was an executive order issued by President Biden soon after taking office in January 2021. The Office of Management and Budget has been reviewing regulatory changes proposed by the Treasury Department and IRS, details of which were published in April 2022. 

These regulatory changes would alter the way health insurance exchanges calculate a family’s eligibility for subsidies when the family has access to an employer-sponsored health insurance plan. If the changes go into effect in 2023 as proposed, audits of the 2023 fiscal year will need to account for the new regulations and potentially conduct different testing protocols for different parts of the year. 

Our team is closely following these proposed changes to help ensure our clients are prepared to follow the new regulations. Earlier this week, we attended a public hearing held by the Treasury Department, where representatives of various groups spoke in support of, or in opposition to the proposed regulatory change. Supporters noted that families with plans that offer expensive coverage for dependents would benefit from this change through reduced costs and more coverage options, including provider networks that may more closely align with the family members’ needs. Those in favor of the change anticipate that families with children would see the most benefit. 

Those opposed to the change expressed that due to the way the law is currently written, they do not see the regulatory flexibility for the administration to make this change through administrative action. Additionally, concerns were raised that families covered by multiple health insurance plans could be faced with higher out-of-pocket-costs due to having separate deductibles that must be met on an annual basis. Lastly, not all families that have unaffordable insurance would see financial relief under this proposal. 

The Treasury Department is expected to announce its decision in time for open enrollment for plan year 2023 which is scheduled to begin on November 1, 2022. Our team will continue to monitor the situation closely and provide updates on how the changes may impact our clients. 

For more information

If you have more questions or have a specific question about your situation, please reach out to us. There is more information to consider when evaluating the effects these changes will have on the landscape of healthcare access and affordability, and we’re here to help.

Article
Fixing the "family glitch": How a proposed change to the ACA will affect healthcare subsidies 

Read this if you are a community bank.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) recently issued its first quarter 2022 Quarterly Banking Profile. The report provides financial information based on Call Reports filed by 4,796 FDIC-insured commercial banks and savings institutions. The report also contains a section specific to community bank performance. In first quarter 2022, this section included the financial information of 4,353 FDIC-insured community banks. BerryDunn’s key takeaways from the report are as follows:

Community banks continue to feel the impact of shrinking net interest margins and inflation.

Community bank quarterly net income dropped to $7 billion in first quarter 2022, down $1.1 billion from a year ago. Lower net gains on loan sales and higher noninterest expenses offset growth in net interest income and lower provisions. Net income declined $581.3 million, or 7.7 percent from fourth quarter 2021 primarily because of lower noninterest income and higher noninterest expense.

Loan and lease balances continue to grow in first quarter 2022

Community banks saw a $21.5 billion increase in loan and lease balances from fourth quarter 2021. All major loan categories except commercial & industrial and agricultural production grew year over year, and 55.3 percent of community banks recorded annual loan growth. Total loan and lease balances increased $35.1 billion, or 2.1 percent, from one year ago. Excluding Paycheck Protection Program loans, annual total loan growth would have been 10.2 percent.

Community bank net interest margin (NIM) dropped to 3.11 percent due to strong earning asset growth.

Community bank NIM fell 15 basis points from the year-ago quarter and 10 basis points from fourth quarter 2021. Net interest income growth trailed the pace of earning asset growth. The yield on earning assets fell 28 basis points while the cost of funding earning assets fell 13 basis points from the year-ago quarter. The 0.24 percent average cost of funds was the lowest level on record since Quarterly Banking Profile data collection began in first quarter 1984. 

Community bank allowance for credit losses (ACL) to total loans remained higher than the pre-pandemic level at 1.28 percent, despite declining 4 basis points from the year-ago quarter.


NOTE: The above graph is for all FDIC-Insured Institutions, not just community banks.

The ACL as a percentage of loans 90 days or more past due or in nonaccrual status (coverage ratio) increased to a record high of 236.7 percent. The decline in noncurrent loan balances outpaced the decline in ACL, with the coverage ratio for community banks emerging 57.9 percentage points above the coverage ratio for noncommunity banks. 

The banking landscape continues to be one that is ever-evolving. With interest rates on the rise, banks will find their margins in flux once again. During this transition, banks should look for opportunities to increase loan growth and protect and enhance customer relationships. Inflation has also caused concern not only for banks but also for their customers. This is an opportune time for banks to work with their customers to navigate the current economic environment. Community banks, with their in-depth knowledge of their customers’ financial situations and the local economies served, are in a perfect position to build upon the trust that has already been developed with customers.

As always, please don’t hesitate to reach out to BerryDunn’s Financial Services team if you have any questions.

Article
FDIC issues its First Quarter 2022 Quarterly Banking Profile

Read this if you are a leader in the healthcare industry.

BerryDunn recently held its first annual Healthcare Leadership Summit. Here are some highlights of the topics, presentations, and discussions of the day. 

Healthcare CFO survey results

The day began with an industry update where Connie Ouellette and Lisa Trundy-Whitten had the opportunity to present with Rob Culburt, Managing Director, Healthcare Advisory, The BDO Center for Healthcare Excellence & Innovation. Rob shared highlights from a recent survey of healthcare CFOs by The BDO Center for Healthcare Excellence & Innovation, while Connie and Lisa reflected on the similarities between study results and hospital and senior living clients.

It was no surprise the study found one of the most significant challenges CFOs are facing at both the national and local level is the sustained strain on healthcare systems amid the pandemic, and ongoing supply chain and workforce struggles. Additionally, providers are concerned about the upcoming reporting and regulation requirements. Also top of mind are the Provider Relief Fund (PRF) reporting requirements, as the requirements have been ambiguous and ever changing. There is also concern among survey respondents that a misinterpretation or reporting error could cause providers to have to pay back funding they received from PRF.

The BDO healthcare survey reported that 63% of the providers who responded to the survey are thriving, but 34% are just surviving. Out of those surveyed, 82% expect to be thriving in one year. You can view the full results of the survey here

Recruitment and retention in the current climate

Recruitment and retention of direct care providers are significant challenges within the senior living industry. Providers are facing workforce shortages that are forcing them to temporarily suspend admissions, take beds off line, and, in worst case scenarios close whole units or facilities. Sarah Olson, BerryDunn's Director of Recruiting and Bill Enck, Principal at BerryDunn discussed factors leading to the talent shortage, and shared creative short- and long-term recruitment and retention strategies to try.

Change management

The pandemic has forced many in healthcare to rethink how they operate their facilities. Employees have had to pivot on a moment’s notice, and in general do more with less. However, there are still initiatives that need to be undertaken and projects that must be completed in order for your facility to operate and remain financially viable. How do you manage the change associated with these projects? Can you manage the change without burning out your employees? Dan Vogt, BerryDunn Principal, and Boyd Chappell from Schoolcraft Memorial Hospital provided tips and strategies for managing change fatigue. 

Overall, the Leadership Healthcare Summit proved to be an informative and engaging event, and many new ideas and forward-looking strategies were shared to help enable providers to continue to weather current challenges and pistion themselves for success. For more in-depth information on these topics and others discussed, please visit our Healthcare Leadership Summit resources page

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Top three takeaways from BerryDunn's first annual Healthcare Leadership Summit 

Read this if you are at a state Medicaid agency.

The Covid-19 Public Health Emergency (PHE) placed US state and territory Medicaid programs on the front line of reorganizing what healthcare looks like for millions of Medicaid enrollees. Each Medicaid program shifted automation and manual procedures in order to comply with and benefit from the increased federal funding in early 2020. With the PHE winding down, every Medicaid program must look at how to return to regular operations and unwind, or undo, the continuous coverage requirement temporarily put in place by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service (CMS). BerryDunn has collaborated with Medicaid programs to identify best practices and consider new opportunities to implement rollback methods in an effort to lower risk during the unwinding period and beyond. 

New learning programs considered

Administrators who have been assessing their staff and operational readiness to support the expected influx of renewals, policy changes, and staffing changes are considering launching learning programs ahead of the unwinding efforts. Using this time to engage with staff has uncovered the need to redeploy fundamental learning programs to prepare for the anticipated high volume of two-years of renewals. Administrators have also begun to engage with community leaders and health plan organizations in ways that provide coordinated and complete communication to beneficiaries. Many programs have looked at expanding benefits within the guidelines of CMS, such as extending post-partum coverage to a full 12 months and increasing reasonable compatibility to a larger percentage, recognizing the economy has evolved since 2020.

Other outreach efforts

During the pandemic, many beneficiaries moved without notifying the Medicaid program of the address change. Proactive Medicaid programs are working directly with health programs and medical facilities to ensure the most updated addresses are captured, and are using public transportation advertisements, online website reminders, and email notifications to encourage beneficiaries to update addresses.

In other locations with a high rate of unemployment in specific industries, Medicaid programs are working with identified outreach partners like unions and industry associations to communicate messaging of Medicaid benefits. Thousands of employees may have lost full-time employment during the pandemic and have returned to work with reduced hours and less benefits. As a sign of changing times, some programs are employing social media campaigns to connect with existing and new enrollees. 

Medicaid programs across the states and territories are finding creative ways to reach impacted communities. Program administrators are organizing staff and systems to be well positioned to undo the effects of the temporary policies. The dismantling of the two-plus years of PHE is expected to be performed within a 12-month period. As administrators eagerly anticipate the announcement of an extension or the pending PHE unwinding start date, one thing is certain: US states and territories are preparing to support an extensive population of Medicaid beneficiaries post pandemic.

BerryDunn is partnering with many states and territories to help ensure a successful unwind of temporary services and return to normal operations. If you would like to discuss how BerryDunn can support your needs, contact the Medicaid consulting team.
 

Article
How Medicaid programs are preparing for the operational challenges of the PHE unwinding

Read this if you are a Police Executive, City/County Administrator, or elected government official responsible for a law enforcement agency. 

Are your officers overwhelmed with workload? Have you been asked to do more with less? Is your agency struggling with maintaining sworn staffing levels? Has your community been questioning why the police respond to things that might be more appropriately handled by others?

If you answered yes to one or more of these questions, your agency might benefit from a comprehensive analysis of your police call-for-service (CFS) response model. 

Increasing CFS workloads

Many police agencies in the US have been struggling with increasing CFS workloads, while simultaneously facing ever-tightening budgets and unprecedented attrition and vacancy rates. As a result of these challenges and national trends calling for police response reform, many police departments have started to ask a very simple question: “Is there a better way?”

Considering alternatives to police CFS response is not new. In fact, many agencies already use some form of CFS diversion, whether through a telephone response unit (TRU), online reporting, mobile apps, or the use of non-sworn personnel. What is different and new in the most recent discussion is the understanding that this conversation is not simply about providing these alternatives as possible options.

It is about considering fundamental changes to how police departments do business, including identifying collaboration opportunities with other organizations and in some cases outsourcing certain CFS types entirely.

Despite growing interest among police agencies in identifying alternatives to the traditional police CFS model, many have struggled to deliver an objective process that can produce meaningful results, and in some cases, suggested revisions have met with resistance from staff, elected officials, and community members.   

Best-practices approach to call for service response model

The best-practices approach to conducting an Essential CFS Evaluation should be one that is highly collaborative, but also expand beyond the walls of the police department. The 21st Century Policing Task Force final report explains:

Law enforcement agencies should work with community residents to identify problems and collaborate on implementing solutions that produce meaningful results for the community… and do things with residents in the co-production of public safety rather than doing things to or for them. 

Determining possible alternatives to traditional CFS police response requires substantial data collection and analysis to inform and guide outcomes and recommendations. It also requires a thorough and comprehensive process that considers:

  • Legal mandates
  • Immediate response needs
  • Potential risk
  • Workload volumes by CFS type
  • Operational policies and training
  • Alternative resources, whether or not they currently exist
  • Community priorities and expectations
  • Fiscal impacts

The cost of providing consistent and effective public safety services is one of the more critical reasons for considering CFS response alternatives. Although officer salaries vary by state, region, or department, the cost of staffing a non-sworn position is typically 40%-45% of the cost of a sworn officer.  

There is a common reason why the legal profession has attorneys and paralegals, the medical profession has doctors and physician’s assistants, and why many ambulance companies have moved to a paramedic and emergency medical technician (EMT) team, as opposed to staffing two paramedics in one ambulance. Cost is a driving force in these examples and the same circumstances are present in the law enforcement industry (among others). A well-trained non-sworn police staff member can handle a variety of CFS that do not require the presence of a sworn officer—likely at half the cost. Shifting the work burden from sworn to non-sworn personnel benefits officers by freeing them up to perform tasks that require an officer to respond, and it benefits the department and community by reducing costs. 

Beyond the issue of cost, there is also increasing conversation about the effectiveness and appropriateness of using police personnel to manage a variety of CFS types, including mental health incidents and those involving the unhoused, for example. Regardless of the CFS type, it is critical to use a process that involves influential participation by both providers and consumers. 

Making changes to the traditional police CFS response model is involved and it requires a thoughtful approach. BerryDunn has developed an Essential CFS Evaluation process that considers numerous critical factors to produce data that police staff, community and elected leaders can rely upon in making critical decisions about future public safety needs. 

If you are curious or have questions about our Essential CFS Evaluation process, our dedicated Justice & Public Safety team is available to discuss your organization’s needs.

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Challenge accepted: Fixing the traditional call-for-service model