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Accounting 101 for development directors: Five things to know

By:
Leah Pillsbury is a Staff Auditor at BerryDunn. Before joining the firm, Leah spent a decade working at not-for-profits, primarily as a fundraiser, specializing in capital campaigns. Leah’s time spent in the fundraising capacity has given her valuable perspective insight into the not-for-profit audit experience.
Leah Pillsbury
12.11.18

Good fundraising and good accounting do not always seamlessly align. While they all feed the same mission, fundraisers work to meet revenue goals while accountants focus on recording transactions in compliance with accounting standards. We often see development department totals reported to boards that are not in line with annual financial statements, causing confusion and concern. To bridge this information gap, here are five accounting concepts every not-for-profit fundraiser should know:

1.

GAAP Accounting: Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) refers to a common set of accounting standards and procedures. There are as many ways for a donor to structure a gift as there are donors?GAAP provides a common foundation for when and how you should record these gifts.

2.

Pledges: Under GAAP, if there is a true, unconditional “promise to give,” you should record the total pledge as revenue in the current year (with a little present value discounting thrown in the mix for payments expected in future periods). A conditional pledge relies on a specific event happening in the future (think matching gift) and is not considered revenue until that condition is met. (See more on pledges and matching gifts here.) 

3.

Intentions: We sometimes see donors indicating they “intend” to donate a certain amount in the future. An intention on its own is not considered a true unconditional promise under GAAP, and isn’t recorded as revenue. This has a big impact with planned giving as we often see bequests recorded as revenue by the development department in the year the organization is named in the will of the donor—while the accounting guidance specifically identifies bequests as intentions to give that would generally not be recorded by the finance team until the will has been declared valid by the probate court.

4.

Restrictions: Donors often impose restrictions on some contributions, limiting the use of that gift to a specific time, program, or purpose. Usually, a gift like this arrives with some explicit communication from donors, noting how they want to apply the gift. A gift can also be considered restricted to a specific project if it is made in direct response to a solicitation for that project. The donor restriction does not generally determine when to record the gift but how to record it, as these contributions are tracked separately.

5. Gifts vs. Exchange: New accounting guidance has been released that provides more clarity on when a gift or grant is truly a contribution and when it might be an exchange transaction. Contact us if you have any questions.


Understanding the differences in how the development department and finance department track these gifts will allow for better reporting to the board throughout the year—and fewer surprises when you present financial statements at the end of the year. Stay tuned for parts two and three of our contribution series. Have questions? Please contact Emily Parker of Sarah Belliveau.

 

Related Services

A capital campaign is a big undertaking. During the planning stage of a capital campaign you need to not only focus on your donor outreach strategy, but also on outreach materials. From an accounting standpoint, the language you use can have a big impact on how the funds will be tracked and ultimately used by the organization. We recommend our clients share their outreach materials with us early in the process so we can measure them against standard accounting practice and regulations. Here are a few things to consider and plan as you get started.

Three components to understand

1.

Pledges. Make sure you understand the difference between a pledge and an intention. From an accounting perspective, only an “unconditional promise to give” is recorded as revenue—an intention to give does not usually meet that criteria. It’s especially important to have this conversation if there is a planned giving element of the campaign, because accounting for bequests can be confusing at times. (You can learn more about intentions here).

2.

Matching Gifts. Matching gift drives can be very successful aspects of your campaign. Be aware that pledges to match gifts from other donors are not considered revenue for accounting purposes until those conditions have been met.

3.

Gift Restriction. For many donors, capital campaigns are particularly appealing, because they fund exciting and tangible projects. Donors who give for a specific building project or scholarship fund are imposing a restriction on how you can use that money. Restrictions can be explicit, as in the case when a gift is accompanied by a note describing the purpose of the gift. However, accounting guidelines also stipulate that restrictions can be implicit—arising from the circumstances surrounding the gift, not necessarily specific instructions from the donor. For example, if a campaign appeal for a new community building focuses just on that project, gifts in response to that appeal may be restricted to building expenses, and can’t be spent on other expenses of the organization.

Not sure where to start? Here are three helpful tools to get the conversation going.

Three must-haves to build your campaign

1.

Gift Acceptance Policy. Hopefully, your not-for-profit has a written gift acceptance policy. If not, start there. A gift acceptance policy outlines guidelines for pledges, restrictions, and the full range of contribution types-from stocks and bonds to real estate and life insurance policies. A good policy serves as a guide for fundraisers and protects the organization from accepting gifts that may not be beneficial.

2.

Campaign Counting Policy. An essential part of campaign planning is the development of a counting policy, which outlines what gifts are counted toward the overall goal—and how. This is especially important because the campaign counting may differ from how your accounting team records the revenue of the campaign.

3. Pledge Form. Finally, there is the pledge form, where it all comes together. A campaign pledge form should align with the organization’s gift acceptance and counting policies and be written in a way that ensures pledges and gift restrictions are accounted for properly.


In developing each of these tools, be sure to involve your finance department, but also outside experts, such as your legal counsel or your auditing firm, as they can add extra support and knowledge. While launching a capital campaign can seem daunting, proper planning allows the rest of the campaign to run smoothly.  Have questions? Please contact Emily Parker or Sarah Belliveau.

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A CPA's guide to starting a capital campaign

Read this if you are a community bank.

On December 1, 2020, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) issued its third quarter 2020 Quarterly Banking Profile. The report provides financial information based on call reports filed by 5,033 FDIC-insured commercial banks and savings institutions. The report also contains a section specific to community-bank performance based on the financial information of 4,590 FDIC-insured community banks. Here are some highlights from the community bank section of the report:

  • The community bank sector experienced a $659.7 million increase in quarterly net income from a year prior, despite a 116.6% increase in provision expense and continued net interest margin (NIM) compression. This increase was mainly due to loan sales, which were up 154.2% from 2019. Year-over-year, net income increased 10%.
  • Provision expense decreased 32.3% from second quarter 2020 to $1.6 billion. That said, year-to-date provision expense increased 194.3% compared to 2019 year-to-date.
  • NIM declined 41 basis points from a year prior to a record low of 3.27% (on an annualized basis). 
  • Net operating revenue increased by $2.8 billion from third quarter 2019, a 12.1% increase. This increase was attributable to higher revenue from loan sales and an increase in net interest income mainly due to higher interest income from commercial and industrial (C&I) loans (up 14.8%) and a decrease in interest expense (down 36.8%).
  • Average funding costs declined for the fourth consecutive quarter to 0.53%.
  • Growth in total loans and leases was stagnant from second quarter 2020, growing by only 1%. However, total loans and leases increased by 13.4% from third quarter 2019. This increase was mainly due to C&I lending, which was up 71%. This growth in C&I lending was mainly comprised of Paycheck Protection Program loans originated in the second quarter.
  • The noncurrent rate (loans 90 days or more past due or in nonaccrual status) remained unchanged at 0.80% from second quarter 2020. That being said, noncurrent balances were up $1.6 billion in total from third quarter 2019. This year-over-year increase was mainly attributable to increases in noncurrent nonfarm nonresidential, C&I, and farm loan balances.
  • Net charge-offs decreased 22.1% year-over-year and currently stand at 0.10%.
  • Total deposit growth since second quarter 2020 was modest at 1.8%. However, total deposits compared to third quarter 2019 were up 16.7%.
  • The number of community banks declined by 34 to 4,590 from second quarter 2020. This change included one new community bank, three banks transitioning from non-community to community banks, eight banks transitioning from community to non-community banks, 29 community bank mergers or consolidations, and one community bank self-liquidation.

Community banks have been resilient and weathered the 2020 storm, as evidenced by an increase in year-over-year net income of 10%. However, tightening NIMs will force community banks to find creative ways to increase their NIM, grow their earning asset base, and identify ways to increase non-interest income to maintain current net income levels. 

Much uncertainty still exists. For instance, although significant charge-offs have not yet materialized, the financial picture for many borrowers remains uncertain, and payment deferrals have made some credit quality indicators, such as past due status, less reliable. The ability of community banks to maintain relationships with their borrowers and remain apprised of the results of their borrowers’ operations has never been more important. 

Despite the turbulence caused by the pandemic, there are many positive takeaways, and community banks have proven their resilience. Previous investments in technology, including customer facing solutions and internal communication tools, have saved time and money. As the pandemic forced many banks to move away from paper-centric processes, the resulting efficiencies of digitizing these processes will last long after the pandemic. 

If you have questions about your specific situation, please don’t hesitate to contact BerryDunn’s Financial Services team. We’re here to help.
 

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FDIC issues its third quarter 2020 banking profile

Read this if you are a construction company.

I am pleased to introduce 2020 Tax Planning Opportunities: CARES Act, published in conjunction with CICPAC (Construction Industry CPAs-Consultants Association) by a national group of tax professionals focused on the construction industry. BerryDunn is proud to be one of CICPAC’s 65 member firms across the US, and one of only two in New England.

Within the document you’ll find an abundance of useful insights on the following topics and more related to the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act:

  • Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans
  • Net operating losses and excess business loss limitations
  • Qualified Improvement Property (QIP)
  • Payroll cash flow opportunities and employer tax credits

Every business has been impacted by COVID-19 in some form. The CARES Act offers opportunities galore for virtually every business. Now, perhaps more than ever, it’s time to work closely with your BerryDunn tax professional to ensure recovery through this difficult time. 

Read the entire document

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2020 tax planning opportunities: CARES Act whitepaper available now

Read this if your facility or organization has received provider relief funds.

The rules over the use of the provider relief funds (PRF) have been in a constant state of flux since the funds started to show up in your bank accounts back in April. Here is a summary of where we are as of November 30, 2020 with allowable uses of the funds.
 
The most recent Post-Payment Notice of Reporting Requirements is dated November 2, 2020. In accordance with the notice, PRF may be used for two purposes:

  1. Healthcare-related expenses attributable to coronavirus that another source has not reimbursed and is not obligated to reimburse
  2. Lost revenue, up to the amount of the difference between 2019 and 2020 actual patient care revenue

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has issued FAQs as recently as November 18, 2020.  The FAQs include the following clarifications on the allowable uses:

Healthcare related expenses attributable to the coronavirus

  1. PRF may be used for the marginal increased expenses or incremental expenses related to coronavirus.
  2. Expenses cannot be reimbursed by another source or another source cannot be obligated to reimburse the expense.
  3. Other sources include, but are not limited to, direct patient billing, commercial insurance, Medicare/Medicaid/Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), or other funds received from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Provider Relief Fund COVID-19 Claims Reimbursement to Health Care Providers and Facilities for Testing, Treatment, and Vaccine Administration for the Uninsured, and the Small Business Administration (SBA) and Department of Treasury’s Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). This would also include any state and federal grants received as a result of the coronavirus.
  4. Providers should apply reasonable assumptions when estimating the portion of costs that are reimbursed from other sources.
  5. The examples in the FAQs for increased cost of an office visit and patient billing seem to point to only supplemental coronavirus related reimbursement needing to be offset against the increased expense.
  6. PRF may be used for the full cost of equipment or facility projects if the purchase was directly related to preventing, preparing for and responding to the coronavirus; however, if you claim the full cost, you cannot also claim the depreciation for any items capitalized.
  7. PRF cannot be used to pay salaries at a rate in excess of Executive Level II which is currently set at $197,300.

Lost revenues attributable to the coronavirus

  1. Lost revenues attributable to coronavirus are calculated based upon a calendar year comparison of 2019 to 2020 actual revenue/net charges from patient care (prior to netting with expenses).
  2. Any unexpended PRF at 12/31/20 is then eligible for use through June 30, 2021 and calculated lost revenues in 2021 are compared to January to June 2019.
  3. Reported patient care revenue is net of uncollectible patient service revenue recognized as bad debts and includes 340B contract pharmacy revenue.
  4. This comparison is cumulative, for example, if your net income improves in Q4, it will reduce lost revenues from Q2.
  5. Retroactive cost report settlements or other payments received that are not related to care provided in 2019 or 2020 can be excluded from the calculation.

Whether you are tracking expenses or lost revenues, the accounting treatment for both is to be consistent with your normal basis of accounting (cash or accrual).
 
As a reminder, the first reporting period (through December 31, 2020) is due February 15, 2021. The reporting portal is supposed to open January 15, 2021. Any unexpended PRF at December 31, 2020 can be used from January 1, 2021 through June 30, 2021, with final reporting due July 31, 2021.

The guidance continues to change rapidly and new FAQs are issued each week. Please check back here for any updates, or contact Mary Dowes for more information.

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Provider relief funds: Allowable uses 

Read this if you are an engineering or architecture firm working with government agencies reimbursing overhead established in an overhead rate schedule based on direct labor.

We are approaching the end of 2020 and we still don’t have final and authoritative guidance from the U.S. Department of Treasury and the Office of Management and Budget about how to treat the PPP loan forgiveness. Will the Federal Acquisition Regulation, Part 31.201-5, Credits, apply and drastically diminish overhead rates for 2020? Will any credit follow the timing of legal forgiveness? Will you be required to offset subsequent forgiveness against 2020 expenses? 

The lobbyists are hard at work fighting any offset. Will they gain legislative support or will a compromise be negotiated? In the face of so many unknowns, we encourage companies to plan for potential outcomes of this unique situation in order to avoid unwanted surprises in the years to come. What can be done now? Let’s first explore trends we’ve observed for A/E firms for this year:

  • Certain costs, such as travel, meals, seminars and overall office expenses, are lower in 2020 with many employees working from home. 
  • Employees are traveling less and are not participating in networking events; they are focusing more of their time on chargeable work. As a result, utilization rates are higher in 2020 compared to recent years. A 1% change in utilization generally results in an approximate 4% directional change in overhead rate. 

These lower spending, higher chargeability trends are pushing overhead rates down considerably for 2020 and, likely too, for 2021. Depending on the type and the length of projects contracted to include those overhead rates, resulting profitability will also be lower for a few more years when indirect costs increase to normal levels. Proper planning is extremely important in this situation. Here are some questions to ask when considering your options:

  • Are there opportunities to negotiate the project price or terms so project profitability is maintained? Can you negotiate higher labor rates or a fixed overhead rate? 
  • If there isn’t any room for negotiations on projects using actual audited overhead rates, should your company focus business development efforts on bidding on or seeking and forming strategic partnerships to pursue more non-governmental projects? 
  • If the company remains profitable and realizes savings in certain costs this year, can you find ways to spend and increase allowable indirect costs while simultaneously strengthening your company? Can you award higher employee bonuses to boost employee morale and help retain great talent? Or maybe now is the time to ramp up cybersecurity training to strengthen IT controls and employee awareness of how to prevent, detect, and respond to cyber threats or invest in cyber penetration testing. 

Targeted spending on allowable costs will help elevate your overhead rate and help position your company to emerge stronger post-pandemic. If you need any help modeling expected overhead rates or have questions about allowable overhead costs, please contact Estera or Linda. We're here to help. 

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Planning for overhead rate changes: Considerations and strategies

Read this if you are a Financial Operations Principal or in the compliance department.

On July 30, 2013 the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) amended certain reporting, audit, and notification requirements for broker-dealers registered with the SEC. Among other things, these amendments required broker-dealers to file one of two new reports with the SEC—a compliance report, if the broker-dealer did not claim it was exempt from Rule 15c3-3 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, or an exemption report if the broker-dealer did claim it was exempt from Rule 15c3-3 throughout the fiscal year. The Division of Trading and Markets of the SEC came out with frequently asked questions regarding the amendments made on July 30, 2013 and periodically updates this list of frequently asked questions. This list was updated July 1, 2020. Here are some of the most notable changes to the FAQs. For the full list, click here.

Exemption provisions

As noted above, a broker-dealer may claim exemption from Rule 15c3-3. Paragraph (k) of Rule 15c3-3 outlines four exemption provisions: (k)(1), (k)(2)(i), (k)(2)(ii), and (k)(2)(iii). Exemption provision (k)(1) may be claimed by broker-dealers that only perform direct-way mutual fund or variable annuity business. If the broker-dealer performs any other type of business, this exemption may not be claimed. Exemption provision (k)(2)(i) is commonly seen as a catch-all for broker-dealers whose businesses don’t qualify for a different exemption. However, to qualify, the broker-dealer cannot carry margin accounts, must promptly transmit all customer funds and deliver all securities received, and cannot otherwise hold funds or securities for, or owe money or securities to, customers. All transactions must be completed through one or more bank accounts specially designated for such transactions. Exemption provision (k)(2)(ii) is for broker-dealers that introduce transactions to a carrying broker-dealer on a fully disclosed basis. Lastly, exemption provision (k)(2)(iii) may be granted by the SEC upon written application by a broker-dealer. However, the SEC has never granted such an exemption.

Exemption report prohibitions

In some instances, a broker-dealer may not meet any of the exemption provisions of paragraph (k) of Rule 15c3-3. However, the broker-dealer may have also not held customer securities or funds during the fiscal year and therefore not be required to file a compliance report. In these instances, the broker-dealer should file an exemption report, along with a corresponding accountant’s report based on a review of the exemption report. 

Since the broker-dealer has not claimed an exemption under paragraph (k) of Rule 15c3-3, its exemption report should include a description of all the broker-dealer’s business activities and a statement that during the reporting period the broker-dealer (1) did not directly or indirectly receive, hold, or otherwise owe funds or securities for or to customers, other than money or other consideration received and promptly transmitted in compliance with paragraph (a) or (b)(2) of Rule 15c2-4; (2) did not carry accounts of or for customers; and (3) did not carry a propriety securities account of a broker or dealer (PAB accounts, as defined in Rule 15c3-3). Furthermore, on the broker-dealer’s FOCUS report, items 4550, 4560, 4570, and 4580 should be left blank.

Broker-dealers with multiple lines of business

Non-carrying broker-dealers may have multiple lines of business with customers. For instance, a broker-dealer may introduce some customer transactions to a carrying broker-dealer on a fully disclosed basis and also provide M&A transaction services. For the former, a (k)(2)(ii) exemption would be most appropriate. However, in the latter, a (k)(2)(i) exemption would be most appropriate. In these cases, it is common for the broker-dealer to disclose the exemption that best fits their primary line of business. However, the SEC has indicated the broker-dealer should disclose both exemption provisions in these instances, including any exceptions under either exemption. Each exemption provision being claimed should also be indicated on the broker-dealer’s FOCUS report. 

Similarly, some broker-dealers may provide activities that qualify under one or more of the exemption provisions of Rule 15c3-3 as well as activities that involve the activities described in items 1, 2, and 3 above. In these instances, the broker-dealer would not qualify for exemption from Rule 15c3-3 and would be required to file a compliance report with a corresponding accountant’s report based on an examination of the compliance report.

The exemption provisions for broker-dealers can be difficult to navigate. Further exacerbating the difficulty of navigating the exemption provisions, each broker-dealer has a different set of circumstances. The SEC’s Division of Trading and Markets also acknowledges these difficulties, hence the creation of its FAQ list. Broker-dealers should refer to this list, in conjunction with Rule 15c3-3, to ensure compliance. If further clarification is needed, the broker-dealer should consult their Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) representative. 

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The SEC updates its broker-dealer financial reporting rule FAQs 

Read this if you are a financial manager of an ESOP.

Employee Stock Ownership Plans (ESOPs) must generally buy back, or repurchase, participants’ shares when they leave the plan or want to diversify holdings. If the ESOP does not purchase the stock the company is required to purchase the shares from the participant under the “put option” described in Internal Revenue Code (IRS) Section 409(h).These rules require the company to either provide enough cash to the ESOP to fund stock repurchases, if adequate other assets are not available within the ESOP, or to fund the repurchase of shares outside of the ESOP. Anticipating the amount and timing of these repurchases requires a lot of number crunching and assumptions to arrive at an estimated “Repurchase Obligation” at a point in time. In most cases, ESOPs enlist the help of valuation specialists, actuaries, or outsider vendors to prepare a study.

All this is done as a component of ESOP cash flow planning but also begs the question, what do you need to record or disclose in your company’s financial statements related to this obligation?

The Financial Accounting Standards Board’s guidance on the subject is contained in Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 718, Compensation - Stock Compensation. More specifically, ASC Section 718-40-50 clearly outlines the terms, allocated share and fair value information, compensation and other related disclosure requirements for ESOPs in paragraphs 1a through g. One of these requirements—paragraph f—requires disclosure of “the existence and nature of any repurchase obligation...” While the existence of a potential repurchase obligation is undeniable due to the requirements of IRC Section 409(h), disclosure of the nature of the obligation may require judgement and a careful reread of the plan documents.

Existence of the obligation

What private companies record for redemptions is straightforward. They are required to accrue obligations related to redemption events initiated on or before the balance sheet date and disclose share and obligation balance information related to those transactions of material.

Disclosures must include the number of allocated shares and the fair value of those shares as of the balance sheet date. This sounds like a general disclosure of terms, but the intention is to communicate maximum repurchase obligation exposure. If redemptions subsequent to the balance sheet date require material and imminent use of cash, the company should consider whether it is required to disclose them as a subsequent event (including amounts) under ASC Topic 855, Subsequent Events.

Nature of the obligation

So, what do you need to disclose specific to the nature of your company’s ESOP shares repurchase obligation?

Put options against the ESOP trust (i.e., rights afforded under the ESOP requiring the trust to purchase outstanding stock at given prices within specific time horizons). Plan terms allowing redemption payments in excess of a certain threshold to be made over a defined period of time (e.g., retiring employees with vested balances greater than $5,000 may receive their payments in equal installments over a five-year period, while those with lower balances may receive their benefit in a lump sum).

If your company’s ownership has an ESOP component or you are considering an ESOP as part of your exit strategy, please reach out to Linda Roberts and Estera Ciparyte-McDonald. They can help you better understand the myriad considerations to be taken into account, and the required and potential financial statement impact and disclosures.

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ESOP repurchase obligations―Planning for future pay ups

Read this if you are a home health agency (HHA).

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed rule, CY2021, was published on June 30, 2020. The proposed rule indicates that the Request for Advance Payment (RAP) currently permitted will be eliminated for all 30-day home health periods beginning on or after January 1, 2021. If adopted, this proposed rule will impact the timing of cash flow for HHAs. HHAs will no longer receive an advanced payment, but rather will not be paid until approximately 45-60 days after the period of care has begun. The change in timing of the payment should be considered as part of your HHA’s cash flow forecasting.

Note: Although the RAP payment has been eliminated, HHAs will still be required to submit a zero dollar RAP bill at the beginning of each 30-day period to establish home health services. 

Also included in the proposed rule is a transition from a RAP to a Notice of Admission (NOA) in 2022. This is similar to the Notice of Election under the hospice benefit, since there will no longer be a RAP. It is proposed that HHAs would submit a one-time NOA that establishes care in place of the RAP for the patient until discharged. 

There will be a payment penalty if either the zero dollar RAP in CY2021 or NOA in 2022 is not submitted within five calendar days from the start of care. The penalty is proposed to be a payment reduction of 1/30th to the wage and case-mix adjusted 30-day period of care reimbursement for each day late until submitted, reducing the total reimbursement for patient care. HHAs should be monitoring the timeliness of RAP submissions to be prepared for this proposed change and avoid potential reimbursement reduction if this proposed rule is passed. Read the entire proposed rule.

Please contact a BerryDunn Home Health team member to assist you with evaluating the cash flow impact these proposed changes may have to your organization. 

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Medicare Home Health Notice of Admission Proposed Rule CY2021 and its cash flow impact

Read this if you are an engineering or architecture firm working with government agencies reimbursing overhead established in an overhead rate schedule based on direct labor.

It seems everyone is both anxious to gain forgiveness of their PPP loans and worried about the ramifications of requesting and being granted forgiveness. There is so much you need to consider to understand the potential impact forgiveness may have on your future cash flow and revenues. Let’s focus, though, on your overhead rate.

Some things to consider:

  • PPP loan forgiveness may significantly reduce your overhead rate. As a result, future contracts and related revenues from federal, state, or local government agencies will be impacted. 

    Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) 31.201-5 dictates that the applicable portion of any income, rebate, allowance, or other credit relating to any allowable cost and received by the contractor shall be credited to the government. If the credit will be used to reduce the indirect labor costs and rent, some of the largest costs of A/E firms, the overhead rate might be reduced by as much as 25% to 30%. 
  • Guidance on the timing of credit offset is still unclear.

    Do you offset 2020 expenses for forgiveness not settled until 2021 to better match cash flows and credit expenses relevant to forgiveness? Or reflect the forgiveness in the Schedule during the period forgiveness was formally received?
  • The IRS is currently communicating that the costs incurred to gain PPP loan forgiveness will not be deductible expenses, thus increasing 2020 taxable income.

    If your company is in a taxable position, federal income taxes will increase as a result and impact cash flows. And remember, federal income taxes are unallowable costs in overhead rate schedules under FAR Part 31.201-41.

Depending on the concentration of your contracts with federal agencies, the significance of overhead rate reimbursement on contract revenues and expectations for growth, it may actually be more beneficial to pay the loan back instead of asking for forgiveness.

The Department of Defense (DOD) weighs in:

Often the first agency to establish policy or make changes, the DOD has issued guidance in the form of answers to FAQs about CARES Act impacts on DOD pricing and contracting. Q23 specifically addresses the issue of PPP loan forgiveness. It states, “to the extent that PPP credits are allocable to costs allowable under contract, the Government should receive a credit or a reduction in billing for any PPP loans or loan payments that are forgiven.” You can read that and other CARES Act credit guidance here. Even if you don’t directly work with DoD, other federal agencies and state DOT’s generally adopt DoD’s guidance. 

What if we apply forgiveness credit against direct labor? 

You might wonder, why not just apply the credit against direct and indirect labor in proportion to the actual payroll paid during the PPP loan covered period? If this was possible, the overhead rate might actually increase. Unfortunately, billing the government for direct labor costs offset on the overhead rate schedule with the credit of PPP loan forgiveness would violate FAR Part 31 cost principles. Since you can’t bill for credited costs, revenues for contracts with government agencies would be further reduced. 

We advise a wait and see approach.

The best action plan to do right now is to wait for better and clearer guidance. Industry associations such as ACEC are advocating for more favorable PPP loan forgiveness treatment. Furthermore, there are still quite a few unanswered questions by the SBA. 

If you have any questions related to your overhead rate and the impact of PPP loan forgiveness on your revenue from contracts with government agencies, please contact us. We’re here to help. 


 

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PPP loan forgiveness will likely impact your overhead rate!