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Save time and effort—our list of tips to prepare for
year-end
reporting

06.23.22

Editor's note: read this if you are a CFO, controller, accountant, or business manager.

We auditors can be annoying, especially when we send multiple follow-up emails after being in the field for consecutive days. Over the years, we have worked with our clients to create best practices you can use to prepare for our arrival on site for year-end work. Time and time again these have proven to reduce follow-up requests and can help you and your organization get back to your day-to-day operations quickly. 

  1. Reconcile early and often to save time.
    Performing reconciliations to the general ledger for an entire year's worth of activity is a very time consuming process. Reconciling accounts on a monthly or quarterly basis will help identify potential variances or issues that need to be investigated; these potential variances and issues could be an underlying problem within the general ledger or control system that, if not addressed early, will require more time and resources at year-end. Accounts with significant activity (cash, accounts receivable, investments, fixed assets, accounts payable and accrued expenses and debt), should be reconciled on a monthly basis. Accounts with less activity (prepaids, other assets, accrued expenses, other liabilities and equity) can be reconciled on a different schedule.
  2. Scan the trial balance to avoid surprises.
    As auditors, one of the first procedures we perform is to scan the trial balance for year-over-year anomalies. This allows us to identify any significant irregularities that require immediate follow up. Does the year-over-year change make sense? Should this account be a debit balance or a credit balance? Are there any accounts with exactly the same balance as the prior year and should they have the same balance? By performing this task and answering these questions prior to year-end fieldwork, you will be able to reduce our follow up by providing explanations ahead of time or by making correcting entries in advance, if necessary. 
  3. Provide support to be proactive.
    On an annual basis, your organization may go through changes that will require you to provide us documented contractual support.  Such events may include new or a refinancing of debt, large fixed asset additions, new construction, renovations, or changes in ownership structure.  Gathering and providing the documentation for these events prior to fieldwork will help reduce auditor inquiries and will allow us to gain an understanding of the details of the transaction in advance of performing substantive audit procedures. 
  4. Utilize the schedule request to stay organized.
    Each member of your team should have a clear understanding of their role in preparing for year-end. Creating columns on the schedule request for responsibility, completion date and reviewer assigned will help maintain organization and help ensure all items are addressed and available prior to arrival of the audit team. 
  5. Be available to maximize efficiency. 
    It is important for key members of the team to be available during the scheduled time of the engagement.  Minimizing commitments outside of the audit engagement during on site fieldwork and having all year-end schedules prepared prior to our arrival will allow us to work more efficiently and effectively and help reduce follow up after fieldwork has been completed. 

Careful consideration and performance of these tasks will help your organization better prepare for the year-end audit engagement, reduce lingering auditor inquiries, and ultimately reduce the time your internal resources spend on the annual audit process. See you soon. 

Related Professionals

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BerryDunn experts and consultants

Read this if you are a Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) providing services to Medicare beneficiaries.

Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) bad debt expenses resulting from uncollectible Medicare Part A and Part B deductible and coinsurance amounts for covered services are reimbursable under the Medicare Program on a full-utilization Medicare cost report. SNF providers can report allowable Medicare bad debt expense on Worksheet E, form CMS-2540-10. Currently Medicare reimburses 65% of the allowable amount, less sequestration, if applicable.  

BerryDunn maintains a database of SNF as filed Medicare cost reports nation-wide. We analyze data annually, looking for trends and opportunities to help providers optimize available reimbursement. Cost reports data shows that in 2018–2020, on average, 75% of facilities nation-wide reported allowable bad debts, and claimed, on average, close to $63,000 of reimbursable bad debts for Medicare Part A. 

To compare facilities of different sizes and Medicare utilization rate, we also show bad debts on per Medicare patient day basis (figure 2). In FY 2020, all US regions experienced an increase in reimbursable Medicare Part A debt, averaging $19.43 per Medicare patient day.  

Understanding the requirements for bad debts and utilizing this reimbursing opportunity could help your facility’s bottom line. 

Medicare bad debt checklist now available

To support SNFs with reimbursement for these costs, BerryDunn’s healthcare consulting team has developed a checklist that provides insight into the Medicare cost report opportunities. 

Download the checklist, and please contact us if you have any questions about your specific situation or would like to learn more.

Article
Medicare bad debt: Review sample procedures for Skilled Nursing Facilities

Read this if your organization offers health insurance through a health insurance exchange.

When the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed in 2010, it contained a known gap which made healthcare premiums unaffordable for some families covered under Medicare or employer-sponsored health insurance plans. The gap in the law, commonly referred to as the family glitch, was formalized in 2013 as the result of a Final Rule issued by the IRS. 

The “family glitch” calculates the affordability of an employer-sponsored health insurance plan based on the cost for the employee, not additional family members. An article published in April 2022 on healthinsurance.org estimated that the cost of health insurance for a family covered by an employer-sponsored plan could end up being 25% or more of the household’s income, even if the plan was considered affordable (less than 9.61% of the household’s income) for the employee alone. Almost half of the people impacted by the family glitch are children.

The family glitch was allowed to stand in 2013 partly because of concerns that resolving the issue could push more people off employer-sponsored plans and onto marketplace qualified health plans, ultimately raising the cost of subsidies. Since then, several attempts have been made to fix the issue, which affects around five million Americans. The most recent attempt was an executive order issued by President Biden soon after taking office in January 2021. The Office of Management and Budget has been reviewing regulatory changes proposed by the Treasury Department and IRS, details of which were published in April 2022. 

These regulatory changes would alter the way health insurance exchanges calculate a family’s eligibility for subsidies when the family has access to an employer-sponsored health insurance plan. If the changes go into effect in 2023 as proposed, audits of the 2023 fiscal year will need to account for the new regulations and potentially conduct different testing protocols for different parts of the year. 

Our team is closely following these proposed changes to help ensure our clients are prepared to follow the new regulations. Earlier this week, we attended a public hearing held by the Treasury Department, where representatives of various groups spoke in support of, or in opposition to the proposed regulatory change. Supporters noted that families with plans that offer expensive coverage for dependents would benefit from this change through reduced costs and more coverage options, including provider networks that may more closely align with the family members’ needs. Those in favor of the change anticipate that families with children would see the most benefit. 

Those opposed to the change expressed that due to the way the law is currently written, they do not see the regulatory flexibility for the administration to make this change through administrative action. Additionally, concerns were raised that families covered by multiple health insurance plans could be faced with higher out-of-pocket-costs due to having separate deductibles that must be met on an annual basis. Lastly, not all families that have unaffordable insurance would see financial relief under this proposal. 

The Treasury Department is expected to announce its decision in time for open enrollment for plan year 2023 which is scheduled to begin on November 1, 2022. Our team will continue to monitor the situation closely and provide updates on how the changes may impact our clients. 

For more information

If you have more questions or have a specific question about your situation, please reach out to us. There is more information to consider when evaluating the effects these changes will have on the landscape of healthcare access and affordability, and we’re here to help.

Article
Fixing the "family glitch": How a proposed change to the ACA will affect healthcare subsidies 

Read this if you are a leader in the healthcare industry.

BerryDunn recently held its first annual Healthcare Leadership Summit. Here are some highlights of the topics, presentations, and discussions of the day. 

Healthcare CFO survey results

The day began with an industry update where Connie Ouellette and Lisa Trundy-Whitten had the opportunity to present with Rob Culburt, Managing Director, Healthcare Advisory, The BDO Center for Healthcare Excellence & Innovation. Rob shared highlights from a recent survey of healthcare CFOs by The BDO Center for Healthcare Excellence & Innovation, while Connie and Lisa reflected on the similarities between study results and hospital and senior living clients.

It was no surprise the study found one of the most significant challenges CFOs are facing at both the national and local level is the sustained strain on healthcare systems amid the pandemic, and ongoing supply chain and workforce struggles. Additionally, providers are concerned about the upcoming reporting and regulation requirements. Also top of mind are the Provider Relief Fund (PRF) reporting requirements, as the requirements have been ambiguous and ever changing. There is also concern among survey respondents that a misinterpretation or reporting error could cause providers to have to pay back funding they received from PRF.

The BDO healthcare survey reported that 63% of the providers who responded to the survey are thriving, but 34% are just surviving. Out of those surveyed, 82% expect to be thriving in one year. You can view the full results of the survey here

Recruitment and retention in the current climate

Recruitment and retention of direct care providers are significant challenges within the senior living industry. Providers are facing workforce shortages that are forcing them to temporarily suspend admissions, take beds off line, and, in worst case scenarios close whole units or facilities. Sarah Olson, BerryDunn's Director of Recruiting and Bill Enck, Principal at BerryDunn discussed factors leading to the talent shortage, and shared creative short- and long-term recruitment and retention strategies to try.

Change management

The pandemic has forced many in healthcare to rethink how they operate their facilities. Employees have had to pivot on a moment’s notice, and in general do more with less. However, there are still initiatives that need to be undertaken and projects that must be completed in order for your facility to operate and remain financially viable. How do you manage the change associated with these projects? Can you manage the change without burning out your employees? Dan Vogt, BerryDunn Principal, and Boyd Chappell from Schoolcraft Memorial Hospital provided tips and strategies for managing change fatigue. 

Overall, the Leadership Healthcare Summit proved to be an informative and engaging event, and many new ideas and forward-looking strategies were shared to help enable providers to continue to weather current challenges and pistion themselves for success. For more in-depth information on these topics and others discussed, please visit our Healthcare Leadership Summit resources page

Article
Top three takeaways from BerryDunn's first annual Healthcare Leadership Summit 

Read this if you are interested in GASB updates. 

The Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) issued GASB Statement No. 99, Omnibus 2022 on May 9, 2022. The statement enhances comparability in accounting and financial reporting and improves the consistency of authoritative literature by addressing (1) practice issues that have been identified in previous GASB Statements, and (2) adding guidance on accounting and financial reporting for financial guarantees.

We’ve reviewed the statement in its entirety, and broken down key components for you to know. Here are the highlights.  

Accounting and financial reporting for exchange or exchange-like financial guarantees

Financial guarantees is a guarantee of an obligation of a legally separate entity or individual, including a blended or discretely presented component unit, that requires the guarantor to indemnify a third-part obligation holder under specified conditions, in an exchange or exchange-like transactions. 

An entity that extends an exchange or exchange-like financial guarantee should recognize a liability and expense related to the guarantee when qualitative factors and historical data indicate that is it more than likely not a government will be required to make a payment related to the guarantee.

Statement 99 excludes guarantees related to special assessment debt, financial guarantee contracts within the scope of Statement 53, or guarantees related to conduit debt obligations. 

Certain derivative instruments that are neither hedging derivative instruments nor investment derivative instruments

Derivative instruments that are within the scope of Statement 53, but do not meet the definition of an investment derivative instrument or the definition of a hedging derivative instrument are considered other derivative instruments. These “other derivative instruments” should now be accounted for as follows:

  1. Changes in fair value should be reported on the “resource flows statement” separately from the investment revenue classification.
  2. Information should be disclosed in the notes to financial statements separately from hedging instruments and investment derivative instruments.
  3. Governments should disclose the fair values of derivative instruments that were reclassified from hedging derivative instruments to other derivative instruments. 

Leases

If your entity has leases please review the following as Statement 99 clarifies numerous issues from Statement 87, specifically:

  • Lease terms as it relates to options to terminate and option to purchase the underlying assets, in paragraph 12 of Statement 87 has been clarified;
  • Short-term leases in paragraph 12 of Statement 87 has been clarified as it relates to an option to terminate the lease;
  • Lessee and lessor recognition and measurement for leases other than short-term leases that transfer ownership has been clarified, and
  • Lease incentives in paragraph 61 of Statement 87 has been further defined.

Public Private and Public-Public Partnerships (PPPs)

If your entity has PPPs, Statement 99 clarifies the following: 

  • PPP terms
  • Receivable for installment payments (transferor recognition)
  • Receivable for the underlying PP Asset (transferor recognition)
  • Liability for installment payments (operator recognition)
  • Deferred outflow of resources (operator recognition)

Subscription-Based Information Technology Arrangements (SBITAs)

Subscription terms and definitions have been clarified, specifically as it relates with options to terminate, short-term SBITAs, and measurement of subscription liabilities.

If your entity has SBITAs, review the provisions of each SBITA to ensure compliance with Statement 99 paragraphs 23–25.

Replacement of LIBOR

Check with your banking institutions to confirm when they have phased out of LIBOR. Confirm with your banking institutions what specifically has replaced LIBOR and update Financial Statement disclosures as needed. 

SNAP

State governments should recognize distributions of benefits from Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) as a nonexchange transaction. Review Financial Statement disclosure and determine if a disclosure is needed. 

Disclosure of Nonmonetary Transactions

If you engage in one or more nonmonetary transactions during the fiscal year, you will need to disclose those transactions in the notes to the financial statements the measurement of attribute(s) applied to the assets transferred, rather than basis of accounting for those assets.

Pledges of future revenues when resources are not received by the pledging government

When blending the financial statement of a debt-issuing component unit into the financial statements of a primary government pledging revenue for the component unit’s debt, the primary government should reclassify an amount due to the component as an interfund payable and an interfund transfer out simultaneously with the recognition of the revenues that are pledged.

Focus of the government-wide financial statement

Statement 99 reiterates that there should be a total overall government-wide column within the MD&A, Statement of Net Position, and Statement of Activities. This column should exclude all fiduciary activities, including custodial funds. 

Terminology updates

No action is needed. Terminology has been updated in previous pronouncements, for terminology as it relates to Statements 63 and 53. 


Effective dates

The requirements related to the extension of the use of LIBOR, accounting for SNAP distributions, disclosures of nonmonetary transactions, pledges of future revenues by pledging governments, clarification of certain provisions in Statement 34 and terminology updates related to GASB 53 and 63 are effective upon issuance.

The requirements related to leases, PPPs, and SBITAs, are effective for fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2022.

The requirements related to financial guarantees and the classification and reporting of derivative instruments within the scope of Statement 53 are effective for fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2023.

Earlier application is encouraged and permitted for all.

If you would like more information regarding Statement 99, please contact our Audits of Governmental Component Units team. We’re here to help.

Article
Key considerations from GASB Statement No. 99 

Read this if you use QuickBooks Online.

With gas prices so high, you need to track your travel costs as closely as possible. Consider getting a tax deduction for your business mileage.

If you drive even a little for business, it’s easy to let mileage costs slide. After all, it’s a pain to keep track of your tax-deductible mileage in a little notebook and do all the calculations required. If you do rack up a lot of business miles, you probably forget to track some trips and end up losing money.

QuickBooks Online offers a much better way. Its Mileage tools include simple fill-in-the-blank records that allow you to document individual trips. You can either enter the starting point and destination and let the site calculate your mileage and deduction or enter the number of miles yourself.

If you use QuickBooks Online’s mobile app, it can track your miles automatically as you drive (as long as you have the correct settings turned on). Here’s a look at how all of this works.

Setting up 

To get started, click the Mileage link in QuickBooks Online’s toolbar. The screen that opens will eventually display a table that contains information about your trips, but you need to do a little setup first. Click the down arrow next to Add Trip in the upper right corner and select Manage vehicles. A panel will slide out from the right. Click Add vehicle.

 
You’ll need to supply information about your vehicles before you can start entering trips.

You’ll need to supply the vehicle’s year, make, and model. Do you own or lease it, and on what date was the vehicle purchased or leased and put into service? Do you want to have your annual mileage calculated by entering odometer readings or have QuickBooks Online track your business miles driven automatically? When you’re done making your selections and entering data, click Save.

Entering trip data

You can download trips as CSV files or import them from Mile IQ, but you’re probably more likely to enter them manually. Click Add Trip in the upper right corner. In the pane that opens, you’ll enter the date of the trip and either the total miles or start and end point. You’ll select the business purpose and vehicle and indicate whether it was a round trip. When you’re done, click Save. The trip will appear in the table on the opening screen, and your current possible total deduction will be in the upper left corner, along with your total business miles and total miles.

If you want to designate a trip as personal, click the box in front of the trip in that table. In the black horizontal box that appears, click the icon that looks like a little person, then click Apply. Now, the trip will appear in the Personal column and will not count toward your business tax-deductible mileage. 

When you select a trip in the Mileage table, you can mark it as personal so it’s not included in your business tax-deductible miles.

Personal trips can count, too

If you use your vehicle(s) for personal as well as business purposes, tracking some of those miles can also mean a tax deduction. For tax year 2022, you can deduct 18 cents per mile for your travel to and from medical appointments. Note: Medical mileage is only deductible if medical exceeds a certain percent of AGI. Be sure to check with the IRS yearly tax code, as they update the mileage amounts annually.

And if you do volunteer work for a qualified charitable organization, the miles you drive in service of it can be deducted at the rate of 14 cents per mile. You can also claim the cost of parking and tolls, as long as you weren’t reimbursed for any of these expenses. Obviously, the IRS wants you to keep careful records of your charitable mileage, and QuickBooks Online can provide them.

QuickBooks Online doesn’t track these deductions, but you’ll at least have a record of the miles driven.

Auto-track your miles

The easiest way to track your mileage in QuickBooks Online is by using its mobile app. You can launch this and have it record your mileage automatically as you’re driving. Versions are available for both Android and iOS, and they’re different from each other. They also have more features than the browser-based version of QuickBooks Online, like maps, rules, and easier designation of trips as business or personal.

 
The iOS version of Mileage in the QuickBooks Online app

In both versions, you’ll need to click the menu in the lower right corner after you’ve opened the QuickBooks Online app and select Mileage. Make sure Auto-Tracking is turned on. Your phone’s location services tool must be turned on, too. There are other settings that vary between the two operating systems. You can search the help system of either app to make sure you get your settings correct if the onscreen instructions aren’t clear enough.

Of course, you won’t see the fruits of your mileage deductions until you file your 2022 taxes. But you can factor these savings in as you’re doing your tax planning during the year. Please contact the Outsourced Accounting team if you’re having any trouble with QuickBooks Online’s Mileage tools, or if you have questions with other elements of the site.

Article
How QuickBooks Online helps you track mileage

Read this if you are a financial institution.

Choosing a method for estimating lifetime expected losses is a commitment. A commitment that signals, in spite of any other option, you’re certain this method is the right one for you—your segment, portfolio, and institution. While you might be able to support a change in method later, it is much more likely you’ll be living with this decision a good long while. So, how exactly does one know which method is the right one? Let’s take a few minutes to answer some frequently asked questions about selecting methods for CECL.

How many CECL methods are there?

This depends on who you ask. Section 326-20-30-3 of the standard names five (5) categories: discounted cash flow, loss-rate, roll-rate, probability of default, and aging schedule. Some categories, like loss-rate, have several methods. Additionally, some methods seem to be referred to by different names, giving people the impression that there are exponentially more options out there than there really are. With this in mind, I tend to think of two (2) broad categories, and seven (7) unique methods:  

  • Loss-rate methods
    • Snapshot (open pool, static pool, cumulative loss rate)
    • Remaining Life and Weighted Average Remaining Maturity (WARM)
    • Vintage
       
  • Other methods
    • Scaled CECL Allowance for Losses Estimator (SCALE) (option for banks with assets <$1 billion)
    • Discounted Cash Flow (DCF)
    • Probability of default 
    • Migration (roll rate, aging schedule)  

What’s the difference?

The loss-rate methods use actual historical net charge-off information in different ways to derive a loss rate that can then be used to calculate expected losses over the remaining life of a pool. In general, they do this by holding the mix of a group of loans constant (e.g., by year of origination) and then tracking net losses tied to that grouping over time. The “other” methods employ a variety of mathematical techniques and/or credit quality information to estimate expected lifetime losses. For a quick overview of each method and corresponding resources, access our CECL methodologies guide here.

How do I know which to use?

This is the CECL equivalent of the proverbial million-dollar question. Technically, any institution could use any one, or all of these methods. But there are considerations that make some of them a more or less likely fit. For example, if your institution has >$1 billion in assets, SCALE is not even an option for you, and you can cross it off the list. If you are not in a position to afford software, or lack the internal expertise to build a similar model internally, then discounted cash flow and probability of default methods would likely be extremely burdensome in the normal course of business. For that reason, you may need to cross those off your list. If you lack large pools with consistently diverse performance over time, then migration methods will be difficult to support. If you have a relatively stable loan mix, consistent credit culture, and a lot of reliable historical loss data—especially through multiple economic cycles—the loss-rate methods may be a good fit, with or without software. If your portfolio has undergone a lot of changes—products, underwriting standards, merger and acquisition activity—and/or there are significant gaps in key data that cannot be restored, then you might want to re-consider software and one of the “other” methods. 

What are the pros and cons of the various methods?

One pro of the loss-rate and SCALE methods is they have been shown to be manageable without software. Examples of all of these methods have been illustrated using Excel spreadsheets. The use of Excel is also potentially a con, given that more spreadsheets and, maybe more people, are likely going to be involved in computing the Allowance for Credit Losses (ACL). As a result, version control as well as validation of spreadsheet macros, inputs, formulas, math, and risk of accidentally overwriting or deleting values should be addressed. One pro of the discounted cash flow method is that it is a bottom-up approach, meaning each loan’s discounted cash flow (DCF) is computed and then rolled up to the segment level. Because of this, DCF can more easily handle mixed pools, e.g., loans of all vintages, sizes, terms, payment and amortization schedules, etc. A potential con of DCF is that it really requires software, staff trained to use the software appropriately, and an understanding of the vast array of choices, levers, and decisions that come with it.     

Does my choice of method affect my qualitative adjustment options?

How’s this for commitment: maybe. In general, I think it’s safe to say that CECL requires additional thought be given to the nature and degree of adjustments. This is especially true when you look at the combination of potential segmentation changes, new elements of the calculation, and the variety of methods now available. Consider the example of a bank using a loss-rate method and facing a potential economic downturn. If that bank has sufficient history and a relatively stable portfolio mix, credit culture, and geography, then it might elect to use a different time period—say, historical loss-rates observed from the last recession—rather than those more recently computed. In this case, the loss-rate method would already be using a recessionary experience. 

How then, would the bank approach additional qualitative adjustments for changing economic outlooks to ensure it is not layering (or double counting) reserve? Going back to the original “maybe” response, perhaps the answer is less about inherent conflicts between methods and qualitative adjustments. Rather, it’s about understanding that given your chosen method, you may be faced with even more decisions about if, where, and how much adjusting you are doing.

CECL adoption is required. Struggling to adopt isn’t. We can help.

No matter what stage of CECL readiness you are in, we can help you navigate the requirements as efficiently and effectively as possible. For more information, visit the CECL page on our website. If you would like specific answers to questions about your CECL implementation, please visit our Ask the Advisor page to submit your questions.

For more tips on documenting your CECL adoption, stay tuned for our next article in the series. You can also follow Susan Weber on LinkedIn.

Article
Questions to ask when deciding your CECL Method

Read this if you use QuickBooks Online.

You should be running reports in QuickBooks Online on a weekly—if not daily—basis. Here’s what you need to know.

You can do a lot of your accounting work in QuickBooks Online by generating reports. You can maintain your customer and vendor profiles. Create and send transactions like invoices and sales receipts, and record payments. Enter and pay bills. Create time records and coordinate projects. Track your mileage and, if you have employees, process payroll.

These activities help you document your daily financial workflow. But if you’re not using QuickBooks Online’s reports, you can’t know how individual elements of your business like sales and purchases are doing. And you don’t know how all of those individual pieces fit together to create a comprehensive picture of how your business is performing. 

QuickBooks Online’s reports are plentiful. They’re customizable. They’re easy to create. And they’re critical to your understanding of your company’s financial state. They answer the small questions, like, How many widgets do I need to order?, and the larger, all-encompassing questions like, Will my business make a profit this year?

Getting the lay of the land

Let’s look at how reports are organized in QuickBooks Online. Click Reports in the toolbar. You’ll see they are divided into three areas that you can access by clicking the labeled tabs. Standard refers to the comprehensive list of reports that QuickBooks Online offers, displayed in related groups. Custom reports are reports that you’ve customized and saved so you can use the same format later. And Management reports are very flexible, specialized reports that can be used by company owners and managers.


A partial view of the list of QuickBooks Online’s Standard reports 

Standard reports

The Standard Reports area is where you’ll do most—if not all—of your reporting work. The list of available reports is divided into 10 categories. You’re most likely to spend most of your time in just a few of them, including:

  • Favorites. You’ll be able to designate reports that you run often as Favorites and access them here, at the top of the list.
  • Who owes you. These are your receivables reports. You’ll come here when you need to know, for example, who is behind on making payments to you, how much individual customers owe you, and what billable charges and time haven’t been billed.
  • Sales and customers. What’s selling and what’s not? What have individual customers been buying? Which customers have accumulated billable time?
  • What you owe. These are your payables reports. They tell you, for example, which bills you haven’t paid, the total amount of your unpaid bills (grouped by days past due), and your balances with individual vendors.
  • Expenses and vendors. What have I purchased (grouped by vendor, product, or class)? What expenses have individual vendors incurred? Do I have any open purchase orders?

The Business Overview contains advanced financial reports that we can run and analyze for you. The same goes for the For my accountant reports. Sales tax, Employees, and Payroll will be important to you if they’re applicable for your company.

Working with individual reports


Each individual report in QuickBooks Online has three related task options.

To open any report, you just click its title. If you want more information before you do that, just hover your cursor over the label. Click the question mark to see a brief description of the report. If you want to make the report a Favorite, click the star so it turns green. And clicking the three vertical dots opens the Customize link. 

When you click the Customize link, a vertical panel slides out from the right, and the actual report is behind it, grayed out. Customization options vary from report to report. Some are quite complex, and others offer fewer options. The Sales by Customer Detail report, for example, provides a number of ways for you to modify the content of your report so it represents exactly the “slice” of data you want. So you can indicate your preferences in areas like:

  • Report period
  • Accounting method (cash or accrual)
  • Rows/columns (you can select which columns should appear and in what order, and group them by Account, Customer, Day, etc.)
  • Filter (choose the data group you want represented from several options, including Transaction Type, Product/Service, Payment Method, and Sales Rep)

Once you’ve run the report, you can click Save customization in the upper right corner and complete the fields in the window that opens. Your modification options will then be available when you click Custom reports, so you can run it again anytime with fresh data.


You can customize QuickBooks Online’s reports in a variety of ways.

We’ll go into more depth about report customization in a future article. For now, we encourage you to explore QuickBooks Online’s reports and their modification options so that you’re familiar with them and can put them to use anytime. Contact our Outsourced Accounting team if you have any questions about the site’s reports, or if you need help making your use of QuickBooks Online more effective and productive.

Article
Getting started with reports in QuickBooks Online

Read this if you are a financial institution.

As you know by now, ASU No. 2016-13, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326), better known as the CECL standard, has already been implemented for some and will soon be implemented for all others (fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022 to be exact). During your implementation process, the focus has likely been on your loan portfolio, and rightfully so, as CECL overhauls 40+ years of loan loss reserve practices. But, recall that the CECL standard applies to all financial instruments carried at amortized cost. So, it therefore includes held-to-maturity (HTM) debt securities. And, although not carried at amortized cost, the CECL standard also makes targeted enhancements to available-for-sale (AFS) debt securities. As if re-hauling your entire allowance methodology wasn’t enough! Before tearing out your hair because of another CECL-related change, let’s quickly review what is currently required for securities, and then focus on how this will change when you implement CECL.

Current US GAAP

Under current US generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), direct write-downs on HTM and AFS debt securities are recorded when (1) a security’s fair value has declined below its amortized cost basis and (2) the impairment is deemed other-than-temporary. This assessment must be completed on an individual debt security basis. Providing a general allowance for unidentified impairment in a portfolio of securities is not appropriate. The previous amortized cost basis less the other-than-temporary impairment (OTTI) recognized in earnings becomes the new amortized cost basis and subsequent recoveries of OTTI may not be directly reversed into interest income. Rather, subsequent recoveries of credit losses must be accreted into interest income.

CECL: Held-to-maturity securities

Then comes along CECL  and changes everything. Once the CECL standard is implemented, expected losses on HTM debt securities will be recorded immediately through an allowance for credit loss (ACL) account, rather than as a direct write-down of the security’s cost basis. These securities should be evaluated for risk of loss over the life of the securities. Another key difference from current GAAP is that securities with similar risk characteristics will need to be assessed for credit losses collectively, or on a pool basis, not on an individual basis as currently prescribed. Also, contrary to current GAAP, since expected losses will be recorded through an ACL account, subsequent improvements in cash flow expectations will be immediately recognized through earnings via a reduction in the ACL account. CECL effectively eliminates the direct write-down method, with write-offs only occurring when the security, or a portion thereof, is deemed to be uncollectible. 

In practice, there may be some types of HTM debt securities that your institution believes have no risk of nonpayment and thus risk of loss is zero. An example may be a US Treasury debt security or possibly a debt security guaranteed by a government-sponsored enterprise, such as Ginnie Mae or Freddie Mac. In these instances, it is acceptable to conclude that no allowance on such securities is necessary. However, such determination should be documented and changes to the credit situation of these securities should be closely monitored.

Financial institutions that have already implemented CECL have appreciated its flexibility; however, just like anything else, there are challenges. One of the biggest questions that has risen is related to complexity, specifically from financial statement users in regards to the macroeconomic assumptions used in models. Another common challenge is comparability to competitors’ models and estimates. Each financial institution will likely have a different methodology when recording expected losses on HTM debt securities due to the judgment involved. These concerns are not unique to the ACL on HTM debt securities but are nonetheless concerns that will need to be addressed. A description of the methodology used to estimate the ACL, as well as a discussion of the factors that influenced management’s current estimate of expected losses must be disclosed in the financial statements. Therefore, management should ensure adequate information is provided to address financial statement users’ concerns.  

CECL: Available-for-sale securities

Upon CECL adoption, you are also expected to implement enhancements to existing practices related to AFS debt securities. Recall that AFS debt securities are recorded at fair value through accumulated other comprehensive income (AOCI). This will not change after adoption of the CECL standard. However, the concept of OTTI will no longer exist. Rather, if an AFS debt security’s fair value is lower than its amortized cost basis, any credit related loss will be recorded through an ACL account, rather than as a direct write-down to the security. This ACL account will be limited to the amount by which fair value is below the amortized cost basis of the security. Credit losses will be determined by comparing the present value of cash flows expected to be collected from the security with its amortized cost basis. Non-credit related changes in fair value will continue to be recorded through an investment contra account and other comprehensive income. So, on the balance sheet, AFS debt securities could have an ACL account and an unrealized gain/loss contra account. The financial institution will be responsible for determining if the decline in the value below amortized cost is the result of credit factors or other macroeconomic factors. In practice, the following flowchart may be helpful:

Although changes to debt securities may not be top of mind when working through CECL implementation, ensuring you reserve time to understand and assess the impact of these changes is important. Depending on the significance and composition of your institution’s debt security portfolio, these changes may have a significant impact on your financial institution’s financial statements from CECL adoption forward. For more information, visit the CECL page on our website. If you would like specific answers to questions about your CECL implementation, please visit our Ask the Advisor page to submit your questions.

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Don't forget about me! Changes in debt security accounting resulting from CECL