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Senior living organizations and
COVID-
19

03.27.20

Over the last few weeks, CMS and the President have enacted legislation and released guidance to assist the senior living industry in coping with the impact of COVID-19. We recognize the elderly residents of our country are the most vulnerable population and your days are filled caring for your population’s needs and health. Our senior living professionals have written this article to highlight new regulations impacting the industry and offer practical tips for guarding your facility's financial health through the COVID-19 outbreak.

Amidst rapid hourly changes in contending with the coronavirus and its far-reaching impacts, the way you run your facility has changed. Along with this change comes an increase in expenditures. To ensure that your facility is getting much needed financial relief and being properly reimbursed for the full impact of COVID-19, we recommend tracking your expenditures related to the coronavirus. Expenditures related to COVID-19 go beyond the cost of additional Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), they will likely include additional direct care staffing, along with housekeeping, dietary and laundry staffing, and supplies needed to maintain the heightened level of hygiene required to combat the spread of COVID-19 in your facility.

CMS issues waiver of 3-Day Stay and Spell of Illness
On March 14, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued two waivers to aid skilled nursing facilities in addressing the national COVID-19 outbreak. CMS is waiving both the 3-Day Stay and Spell of Illness requirements. Read the COVID-19 Emergency Declaration.

Key provisions to consider with regard to 3-midnight qualifying stay requirement:

  • The exception applies to traditional Medicare coverage only (Medicare Advantage plans may or may not follow this exception);
  • It is in effect as of March 1, 2020, and will only be in effect while public health emergency is declared;
  • Applies only to beneficiaries affected by the emergency or who experience dislocations;
  • Providers have to document medical necessity and clinical reasons for not meeting 3-midnight requirement, understanding that the intent of this provision is to free up hospital beds and reduce potential risk of exposure to the patient;
  • Providers are to use condition code “DR” on the claims. 

Read additional AHCA clarifications and guidance regarding the waivers of 3-Day Stay and Spell of Illness requirements.

MDS completion and submission waivers
CMS is waiving 42 CFR 483.20 to provide relief to SNFs on the timeframe requirements for Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessments and transmissions. CMS has yet to issue technical guidance on how to implement.

On March 22, 2020, CMS announced temporary administrative burden relief related to Quality Reporting which includes certain SNF-specific changes:

  • Quality Reporting Program (QRP) April/May deadline for 10/1/19 - 12/31/19 data submission is optional for those facilities that have not yet submitted data;
  • Facilities do not need to submit 1/1/20 - 6/30/20 data for purposes of compliance with QRP;
  • CMS will not use any data for the first 2 quarters of 2020, 1/1/20 - 6/30/20, in its calculations;
  • Claims for 1/1/20 - 6/30/20 will be excluded from calculation of all-cause readmission measures that result in value-based purchasing adjustments.

Read the full CMS press release.

Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA)
On March 18, 2020, the President signed into law, H.R. 6201, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. The legislation eliminates patient cost-sharing for COVID-19 testing and related services, establishes an emergency paid leave program, and expands unemployment and nutrition assistance. Moreover, the bill provides a temporary 6.2% increase in Federal Medical Assistance Percentages (FMAP) for each calendar quarter occurring during an emergency period.

FMAP is the federal portion of funds for state Medicaid programs. With this temporary increase states can use the increased federal funds for any portion of the state Medicaid program. Due to significant increases in unemployment from business closures, the increase may be used to provide Medicaid coverage for the newly unemployed and uninsured. This would result in less funding for provider rate increases to cover COVID-19 related costs. However, on March 21, 2020, the federal government also announced that it is considering a special enrollment period for Affordable Care Act Health Insurance Exchange coverage. A special enrollment period would offer lower cost coverage to individuals with reduced incomes and could influence how the FMAP increase will be used, possibly resulting in more being allocated to covering provider rates. As of today, it is still unclear how states will use the increased funds.

A table released by AHCA on March 14, 2020, provides estimates of the increase in Federal Medicaid funding from FMAP assuming the increase is in effect January through December 2020. 

There are two provisions of the FFCRA that deal with paid leave provisions for employees. BerryDunn's employee benefits consultants provide insight and clarity on the paid leave provisions for employees.

Prioritization of survey activities
CMS released guidance prioritizing and suspending most federal and state survey agency (SSA) surveys, and delaying revisit surveys, for the next three weeks beginning on March 20, 2020, for all nursing homes. Standard surveys and non-Immediate Jeopardy (IJ) related onsite surveys will be suspended for three weeks. Complaints and facility-reported incidents that are considered at the IJ level will be conducted during this time. Facilities are encouraged to use the CDC developed COVID-19 Focused Survey for Nursing Homes. Get additional CMS guidance

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act
On March 25, 2020, the US Senate unanimously approved the $2 trillion CARES Act (The “Act”). It is anticipated that the House of Representatives will vote on the Act today, March 27, 2020. The White House has signaled that it will sign the measure as approved by the Senate. 

Major provisions of the proposed legislation include:

  • The Medicare 2% sequester will be temporarily suspended starting in late May 2020. 
  • $150 million for modifications of existing hospital, nursing home, and “domiciliary facilities” undertaken as part of COVID-19 response.
  • $65 million for housing for the elderly and people with disabilities for rental assistance, service coordinators and support services for the more than 114,000 affordable households for the elderly, and more than 30,000 affordable households for low-income people with disabilities.
  • $2.8 million to provide staff treating veterans living at Armed Forces Retirement Homes with the personal protective equipment they need. The funding provides this and other necessary equipment and staffing support to help minimize the spread of the coronavirus among residents.
  • $955 million for the Administration for Community Living to support nutrition programs, home- and community-based services, support for family caregivers, and expand oversight and protections for seniors and individuals with disabilities.
  • $200 million for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to assist nursing homes with infection control and support states’ efforts to prevent the spread of the coronavirus in nursing homes.

Practical tips for monitoring and maintaining your organization’s financial health 
As we navigate these next few months, facilities will face challenges to maintain the health and safety of their residents and staff as well as the financial health of the organization. Some things you should be doing now:

  • Calculate your working capital and cash position weekly or bi-weekly.
  • Perform cash flow projections for the next few months. Be sure the timing of your cash receipts will cover payroll and supplies expenditures each week. 
  • Contact your lenders to obtain or increase available working capital lines of credit.
  • Ascertain if you can release any investment balances if needed.


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Please contact the BerryDunn senior living team if you have any questions, or would like to discuss your specific situation.

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Read this if you work in senior living. 

We are all pressed for time these days, especially in senior living and long-term care facilities, where the pandemic has taken a toll on the health of our residents, the well-being of our employees, and the state of our finances. Across the nation, losses from patient care have increased significantly from 2016-2020. In the Northeast, losses from patient care increased 17% from 2016-2019, and in the western United States, they increased by 52% from 2016-2019.

With so many time and financial pressures, why is the development of a labor management program an important investment of your time? Because labor management is important to the financial success of your facility.

Labor management factors to consider:

  • Labor is the largest expense in a facility—between 2016 and 2019 labor-related costs, including contract labor and employee benefits, represented between 48%-53% of the expenses reported on the Medicare cost report 
  • With a growing trend of hiring outsourced therapy, housekeeping, laundry, dietary, and other functions, actual labor related costs could be significantly higher
  • Increased COVID-19 expense may not be fully covered by reimbursement rates
  • Facilities are experiencing increased agency use to fill nursing vacancies, resulting in higher direct labor cost per patient day

The senior living industry is already facing severe nursing shortages and, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, at least 2.5 million more workers will be needed by 2030 to care for the so-called “silver tsunami”. Argentum has projected that 1.2 million new workers—mostly Certified Nursing Assistants, aides and Registered Nurses—will be needed in senior living through 2025.

Workforce shortages are not only occurring in nursing departments, but throughout all of our departments, as senior living competes with the retail and hospitality industry to fill ancillary positions.

The benefits of creating a labor management program

The development of a well-executed labor management program may result in:

Clarity on optimal staffing and competency levels in all departments
Labor budgets and schedules adjusted for both census and patient needs can help facilities have the right people in the right place at the right time. Time invested in this initiative improves patient outcomes, staff morale, and your organization’s bottom line. 

Stronger community integration and leadership
Most senior living facility positions are filled by recruiting locally. Understanding local demographic trends and developing a forward-looking strategy for staff acquisition, retention, and development (both personal and professional) may help a facility become an employer of choice and minimize vacancies. 

Achieving community recognition
A labor management program may help your facility better understand your CMS star rating as it relates to staffing, and tailor a response to publicly available ratings. 

Improved regulatory compliance and response to changes in tax and other policy
Many recent laws have varying provisions for organizations based on size, which is measured by number of employees or full-time employee equivalents. Well-structured labor reports may help your organization respond to regulatory changes promptly.

Opportunities for reimbursement optimization
By understanding your labor structure and compensation arrangements, you may be able to increase reimbursement though more accurate cost reporting (such as utilization review reimbursement on the Medicare cost report). Medicaid reimbursement methodologies vary by state. In many cases, correct classification of labor into reimbursable and non-reimbursable departments, as well as allocations between units, may be key. 

Improved bottom line
Understanding and managing labor statistics may help facilities improve their bottom line, both short and long term, by aligning costs and revenue trends.

Labor management is a key tool to drive efficiency and increase quality across all departments in your facility. Building a high-performing workforce culture and implementing labor management tools will help you gain efficiencies, reduce costs, and produce quality outcomes. The stakes are high right now—facilities that can build a strong culture and workforce will be the facilities that are successful in the future.

If you need assistance or have questions about your specific situation, please contact our senior living consulting team. We’re here to help. 

Article
Six steps for a successful labor management program 

Read this if your senior living facility is receiving Medicare payments.

A year ago the senior living industry was challenged with the transition to the Patient-Driven Payment Model (PDPM). In the months leading up to the implementation of PDPM providers prepared for new regulations, conducted employee training, and forecasted financial performance. By all accounts the implementation of PDPM went off with very few glitches. 

That all changed in the beginning of 2020 when the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic upended the industry and Medicare occupancy levels diminished. COVID-19 overturned the way providers were providing care at their facilities. Providers have seen a decrease in utilization of therapy services and an increase in medical management cases. Providers anticipated delivering more concurrent physical therapy, which has become impossible with COVID-19. We understand how demanding COVID-19 related change management has been for skilled nursing facilities, and want to help you re-focus your attention on the critical tasks and procedures driving your Medicare reimbursement.

New federal fiscal year, new rates

The Medicare Final Rule for fiscal year 2021 did not contain any major policy changes to PDPM but did contain routine updates to coding and Medicare billing rates effective October 1, 2020. After changing Medicare billing rates, you should test your system by carefully reviewing a remittance advice and the accounts receivable report for October service dates. Look for any balances, big or small, to help ensure billing rates and contractuals are correct for all payers following Medicare rules. Note:

  • Small balances may indicate errors in system configuration, such as PDPM rates, sequestration, or value-based purchasing adjustment.
  • Larger balances may indicate a claim missed in the facility's triple-check meeting and billed at an incorrect PDPM rate. View the FFY2021 Medicare Rate Calculator.
  • Providers should review ICD-10 mappings on an annual basis for new and discontinued ICD-10 codes. 

Medicare Advantage plan enrollment is growing. What does it mean for your facility?

With the continuing growth of Medicare Managed Care/Advantage plans, it is important to review your facility’s contracts. 

  • Most Medicare Advantage programs have adopted PDPM, but have differing requirements for pre-authorizations and payment rates, so be sure you understand how each of these contracts reimburses your facility
  • If there are new Medicare Advantage plans in your area, evaluate the need to negotiate a contract to admit patients covered by the new plan. 
  • Update the list of plans your facility contracts with:
     
    • Carefully review contract rates and request rate changes if the payor does not follow the Medicare fee schedule. 
    • To avoid denied claims, update contact information and understand preauthorization requirements and any patient status updates. Distribute the updated list to your admissions and case management teams.

Check on your MDS coordinator

  • With the COVID-related shift in responsibilities, we see an increase in MDS position turnover. We recommend reviewing or developing a backup for your MDS coordinator, as completion of MDS is critical for billing and regulatory compliance. 
  • If your facility has limited resources for backup, evaluate sub-contracting options or reach out to your state’s Health Care Association for available resources. 

Update your consolidated billing resources

Consolidated billing errors could result in significant reductions of your bottom line. CMS updates guidance on consolidated billing regularly. We recommend checking the CMS listing and ensuring your admissions, clinical, and medical records teams use up-to-date information for admission decisions and coordination of care with external health care providers. Get more information.

COVID-19 impact

  • CMS provided a number of flexibilities to help facilities with COVID-related care. Please note, a number of these provisions are temporary, and are only effective during the state of emergency. We recommend at least a monthly review of regulatory guidance to help ensure compliance. Get more information.
  • While the COVID-19 diagnosis and codes were not specifically incorporated into PDPM in the 2021 final rule, be sure to appropriately code isolation stays in the nursing component, and document additional costs of testing, PPE, and labor, as well as support of skilled status need to protect against audit risk.

Have questions? Our Senior Living revenue cycle team is here to help. 

Article
Patient Driven Payment Model―A year later

Our senior living and long-term care professionals have compiled this guide to financial resources for senior living providers, segregated by federal and state programs.

In this guide, you will receive a breakdown of the critical components of each program, related compliance requirements, payment and accounting considerations, and the provider type for which the program is available.

Included on the guide is a publication date. Please check back regularly for updates.

READ THE GUIDE NOW

We're here to help.
If you have any questions, please contact a member of our senior living consulting team.

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Senior living COVID-19 financial resources guide

In our consulting work with Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs) we have identified some early trends in PDPM implementation we would like to share. PDPM has been in place for a little over three months and while there were some hiccups in the first month, claims appear to be processing normally. SNFs are reporting that PDPM has been positive for their facilities. Many are reporting increases in Medicare revenues and feel PDPM has also been positive for the industry. However, it will still be a few months until we can really measure the financial and operational impacts of PDPM. As we continue to evaluate the early results, here are several lessons learned thus far:

  1. The good news is we were ready! 
    There were predictions that SNFs were not going to be prepared and smaller providers were going to go out of business because they could not adapt to PDPM. This has not been the case. Providers report they have been able to successfully bill under PDPM and most providers are reporting increased reimbursement under PDPM. Initial PDPM news is positive for the industry, but to be successful providers must continue to adapt.
  2. There still needs to be more education on the Minimum Data Set (MDS) to optimize reimbursement.
    SNFs are unsure how sections of the MDS work together under PDPM. MDS nurses need more training on what section to enter diagnosis codes and they are unsure when a diagnosis or a check box will generate the PDPM score. Diagnoses that impact Speech Language Pathology (SLP) and any diagnoses that impact Non-Therapy Ancillaries (NTAs) should be recorded on MDS Section I8000. Some diagnoses entered in Section I8000 also have check boxes in Section I that must be checked in order to be properly reimbursed.
  3. There were some missed reimbursement opportunities.
    There are several factors contributing to missed reimbursement opportunities, including delays in receiving information from physicians and other departments. Facilities need to build better relationships with physicians and provider networks to improve communication that focuses on clinical conditions and co-morbidities of the resident. Additionally, procedures need to be in place to gather clinical information within the first three days in order to get all relevant information on the five-day MDS.
  4. Diagnosis should be supported by patient care plan.
    To be in compliance with Medicare regulations and prevent takebacks on audit, diagnoses must be supported by the resident care plan. For example, if a diagnosis code for malnutrition is entered in Section I, then the resident care plan and medical records need to support the diagnosis. The care plan should document information, such as specific risk factors, lab results, and weight tracking results. Reimbursement and treatment decisions need to have a demonstrable benefit to the resident and must be supported by the resident care plan.
  5. Providers need to evaluate how they provide therapy.
    Before making significant changes to their therapy programs, facilities should analyze their therapy utilization and outcomes under PDPM, as compared to outcomes and utilization under RUGS IV. This ensures you are providing high-quality care at the lowest cost. Things to consider are per patient day utilization ratios, cost per minute under PDPM vs RUGS IV, productivity standards under PDPM, and outcomes. SNFs that are decreasing their therapy minutes should be sure they still have good quality outcomes. 
  6. The bad news? Rate adjustments may be coming sooner than expected.
    PDPM was intended to be budget neutral. Based on early results, this does not seem to be the case. More SNFs are reporting they are winners rather than losers under PDPM. The belief is if PDPM continues to track with early results there will be a rate adjustment that could come as early as mid-year. However, it is more likely that CMS will make an adjustment to weights and rates as part of the 2020 rulemaking process.

As we move further into 2020, you can expect to see more data on PDPM claims and reimbursements, which will help you make operational and financial decisions about your facility. In the meantime, you should keep focusing on patient care and achieving quality outcomes while thinking about what you can do now to adapt to be successful under PDPM.

Article
Patient Driven Payment Model (PDPM) implementation lessons learned

Read this if you are a Nursing Home Administrator, Admissions Coordinator, MDS Nurse, Nursing Home Owner, Business Office Manager, Case Manager, Nursing Home CEO, CFO, or COO.

Patient Driven Payment Model (PDPM) implementation is less than three months away. Is your facility ready for admissions under PDPM? The way you think about admissions and the admission process will change under PDPM. Some highlights:

  • The resident’s clinical characteristics will now be the determinant of payment rather than therapy provided.
  • Facilities that admit medically complex residents—those who need higher levels of potentially expensive care, including high-cost medications, ventilator care, and care for residents with HIV/AIDS—will receive reimbursement that more closely reflects those higher costs.
  • PDPM will eliminate the 14-day, 30-day, 60-day and 90-day assessments and will only require a five-day and discharge assessment. 
  • The five-day assessment will drive payment for the entire resident stay unless there is change in the resident’s clinical characteristics. 

With the elimination of the five scheduled assessments under PDPM, facilities will save time spent on assessments; however, PDPM will require a higher degree of accuracy on the Day Five assessment. For proper reimbursement, your staff will have to gather all relevant clinical information on the resident in a shorter period of time. A strong admissions team and processes will help you achieve financial success under PDPM. 

Screening residents for admission will also become more critical for appropriate reimbursement. Under RUGS-IV, most facilities relied only on their admissions coordinator to handle admissions. Under PDPM, facilities are going to have to involve more team members in the pre-admission process to ensure proper and thorough screening of residents. 

Since PDPM focuses on all the resident’s clinical characteristics, you will need pre-admission input from many team members, including but not limited to physicians, nurses, therapy providers, and case management. You will need to assess many other elements up front―if you miss something in the screening, you won’t receive adequate reimbursement. 

With payment tied not only to the residents' primary reasons for being in the facility, but also the comorbidities that affect their health, you need to know more about potential residents prior to admission. The admissions team will need to get a comprehensive background on each resident―including all comorbidities, recent surgical history, and other clinical characteristics and services that determine a resident’s case-mix.

For example, in some cases, two diagnoses, such as aftercare for major joint surgery and an infectious complication, may compete for the primary diagnosis. These two diagnoses would place the resident in different clinical categories and would result in different rates of reimbursement. Working as a team, your staff will have to determine which of these diagnoses most accurately reflects the characteristics of the resident, the services needed by that resident, and the resources that he or she requires.

To emphasize again, under the new PDPM assessment schedule, facilities cannot make changes to resident clinical characteristics on the five-day assessment unless a resident has a significant change in status and the facility performs an interim payment assessment. You really only have one shot at getting it right!

Here are some actions you can take now to strengthen your admissions process:

Standardize practices―Examine inconsistent and/or manual practices within the revenue cycle that may cause delays in gathering documentation and, ultimately, delay billing. Policies and procedures should include items such as team members and responsibilities, pre-admission screening procedures, protocols for communicating with physicians and the admitting hospital, and procedures for capturing and storing supporting documentation. This can help capture all information needed for proper reimbursement.

Review changes to the Minimum Data Set (MDS)―The entire admissions team needs to understand the changes to the MDS so that they capture all the required resident information. There are nearly 40 new MDS items that directly influence a resident’s clinical classification and payment rates. The most significant of these?

  • I0020B―To report the ICD-10-CM primary diagnosis code representing the main reason for Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) admission
  • J2100-J5000―New patient surgical history items that affect the PDPM physical and occupational therapy and speech-language pathology components
  • I8000―To report comorbidities that affect non-therapy ancillaries
  • O425A1-O0425C5―To capture discharge information on therapy delivery over the course of the resident's entire Part A stay, including use of group and concurrent therapy.

Educate staff―Train your staff on the new processes and tools, as these processes directly impact daily job functions. In addition, staff should have an understanding of the functions of the entire revenue cycle so they can see how their functions affect the overall reimbursement of the facility.

Review and monitor―To better prepare for PDPM, you should review your resident charts to understand what information you are currently documenting and know what additional information you will need to gather upon admission. Even though you are not yet billing under PDPM, you can start gathering and documenting that additional information. Review your facility's utilization review and triple check processes. You should have a cross-functional utilization review team that includes a physician or mid-level practitioner to ensure comprehensive reviews. Once you begin documenting, under PDPM you will need to audit MDS to be sure they are accurate and supported by medical documentation.

You will only have until Day Eight of a resident stay to capture and document all the resident's clinical characteristics that drive payment for the entire stay. It is more important than ever to have a clearly defined, well-executed plan for getting the right information to the right people as soon as possible.

Read more
You can read Part One of this series here. Part Three is coming soon.

Get ready with our PDPM Checklist!

Download our helpful PDPM checklist and see what you need to do. 

Article
PDPM is coming: Is your admissions team ready?