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$200 Million Maine Economic Recovery Grant Program released

08.24.20

Read this if you are a Maine business or organization that has been affected by COVID-19. 

The State of Maine has released a $200 million Maine Economic Recovery Grant Program for companies and organizations affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Here is a brief outline of the program from the state, and a list of eligibility requirements. 

“The State of Maine plans to use CARES Act relief funding to help our economy recover from the impacts of the global pandemic by supporting Maine-based businesses and non-profit organizations through an Economic Recovery Grant Program. The funding originates from the federal Coronavirus Relief Fund and will be awarded in the form of grants to directly alleviate the disruption of operations suffered by Maine’s small businesses and non-profits as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Maine Department of Economic & Community Development has been working closely with affected Maine organizations since the beginning of this crisis and has gathered feedback from all sectors on the current challenges.”

Eligibility requirements for the program from the state

To qualify for a Maine Economic Recovery Grant your business/organization must: 

  • Demonstrate a need for financial relief based on lost revenues minus expenses incurred since March 1, 2020 due to COVID-19 impacts or related public health response; 
  • Employ a combined total of 50 or fewer employees and contract employees;
  • Have significant operations in Maine (business/organization headquartered in Maine or have a minimum of 50% of employees and contract employees based in Maine); 
  • Have been in operation for at least one year before August 1, 2020; 
  • Be in good standing with the Maine Department of Labor; 
  • Be current and in good standing with all Maine state payroll taxes, sales taxes, and state income taxes (as applicable) through July 31, 2020;
  • Not be in bankruptcy; 
  • Not have permanently ceased all operations; 
  • Be in consistent compliance and not be under any current or past enforcement action with COVID-19 Prevention Checklist Requirements; and 
  • Be a for-profit business or non-profit organization, except
    • Professional services 
    • 501(c)(4), 501(c)(6) organizations that lobby 
    • K-12 schools, including charter, public and private
    • Municipalities, municipal subdivisions, and other government agencies 
    • Assisted living and retirement communities 
    • Nursing homes
    • Foundations and charitable trusts 
    • Trade associations 
    • Credit unions
    • Insurance trusts
    • Scholarship funds and programs 
    • Gambling 
    • Adult entertainment 
    • Country clubs, golf clubs, other private clubs 
    • Cemetery trusts and associations 
    • Fraternal orders 
    • Hospitals, nursing facilities, institutions of higher education, and child care organizations (Alternate funding available through the Department of Education and Department of Health and Human Services for hospitals, nursing facilities, child care organizations, and institutions of higher education.)

For more information

If you feel you qualify, you can find more details and the application here. If you have questions about your eligibility, please contact us. We’re here to help. 

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What are the top three areas of improvement right now for your business? In this third article of our series, we will focus on how to increase business value by aligning values, decreasing risk, and improving what we call the “four C’s”: human capital, structural capital, social capital, and consumer capital.

To back up for a minute, value acceleration is the process of helping clients increase the value of their business and build liquidity into their lives. Previously, we looked at the Discover stage, in which business owners take inventory of their personal, financial, and business goals and assemble information into a prioritized action plan. Here, we are going to focus on the Prepare stage of the value acceleration process.

Aligning values may sound like an abstract concept, but it has a real world impact on business performance and profitability. For example, if a business has multiple owners with different future plans, the company can be pulled in two competing directions. Another example of poor alignment would be if a shareholder’s business plans (such as expanding the asset base to drive revenue) compete with personal plans (such as pulling money out of the business to fund retirement). Friction creates problems. The first step in the Prepare stage is therefore to reduce friction by aligning values.

Reducing risk

Personal risk creates business risk, and business risk creates personal risk. For example, if a business owner suddenly needs cash to fund unexpected medical bills, planned business expansion may be delayed to provide liquidity to the owner. If a key employee unexpectedly quits, the business owner may have to carve time away from their personal life to juggle new responsibilities. 

Business owners should therefore seek to reduce risk in their personal lives, (e.g., life insurance, use of wills, time management planning) and in their business, (e.g., employee contracts, customer contracts, supplier and customer diversification).

Intangible value and the four C's

Now more than ever, the value of a business is driven by intangible value rather than tangible asset value. One study found that intangible asset value made up 87% of S&P 500 market value in 2015 (up from 17% in 1975). Therefore, we look at how to increase business value by increasing intangible asset value and, specifically, the four C’s of intangible asset value: human capital, structural capital, social capital, and consumer capital. 

Here are two ways you can increase intangible asset value. First of all, do a cost-benefit analysis before implementing any strategies to boost intangible asset value. Second, to avoid employee burnout, break planned improvements into 90-day increments with specific targets.

At BerryDunn, we often diagram company performance on the underlying drivers of the 4 C’s (below). We use this tool to identify and assess the areas for greatest potential improvements:

By aligning values, decreasing risk, and improving the four C’s, business owners can achieve a spike in cash flow and business value, and obtain liquidity to fund their plans outside of their business.

If you are interested in learning more about value acceleration, please contact the business valuation services team. We would be happy to meet with you, answer any questions you may have, and provide you with information on upcoming value acceleration presentations.

Article
The four C's: Value acceleration series part three (of five)

This is our second of five articles addressing the many aspects of business valuation. In the first article, we presented an overview of the three stages of the value acceleration process (Discover, Prepare, and Decide). In this article we are going to look more closely at the Discover stage of the process.

In the Discover stage, business owners take inventory of their personal, financial, and business goals, noting ways to increase alignment and reduce risk. The objective of the Discover stage is to gather data and assemble information into a prioritized action plan, using the following general framework.

Every client we have talked to so far has plans and priorities outside of their business. Accordingly, the first topic in the Discover stage is to explore your personal plans and how they may affect business goals and operations. What do you want to do next in your personal life? How will you get it done?

Another area to explore is your personal financial plan, and how this interacts with your personal goals and business plans. What do you currently have? How much do you need to fund your other goals?

The third leg of the value acceleration “three-legged stool” is business goals. How much can the business contribute to your other goals? How much do you need from your business? What are the strengths and weaknesses of your business? How do these compare to other businesses? How can business value be enhanced? A business valuation can help you to answer these questions.

A business valuation can clarify the standing of your business regarding the qualities buyers find attractive. Relevant business attractiveness factors include the following:

  • Market factors, such as barriers to entry, competitive advantages, market leadership, economic prosperity, and market growth
  • Forecast factors, such as potential profit and revenue growth, revenue stream predictability, and whether or not revenue comes from recurring sources
  • Business factors, such as years of operation, management strength, customer loyalty, branding, customer database, intellectual property/technology, staff contracts, location, business owner reliance, marketing systems, and business systems

Your company’s performance in these areas may lead to a gap between what your business is worth and what it could be worth. Armed with the information from this assessment, you can prepare a plan to address this “value gap” and look toward your plans for the future.

If you are interested in learning more about value acceleration, please contact the business valuation services team. We would be happy to meet with you, answer any questions you may have, and provide you with information on upcoming value acceleration presentations.

Next up in our value acceleration series is all about what we call the four C's of the value acceleration process. 

Article
The discover stage: Value acceleration series part two (of five)

This is the first article in our five-article series that reviews the art and science of business valuation. The series is based on an in-person program we offer from time to time.  

Did you know that just 12 months after selling, three out of four business owners surveyed “profoundly regretted” their decision? Situations like these highlight the importance of the value acceleration process, which focuses on increasing value and aligning business, personal, and financial goals. Through this process, business owners will be better prepared for business transitions, and therefore be significantly more satisfied with their decisions.

Here is a high-level overview of the value acceleration process. This process has three stages, diagrammed here:

The Discover stage is also called the “triggering event.” This is where business owners take inventory of their situation, focusing on risk reduction and alignment of their business, personal, and financial goals. The information gleaned in this stage is then compiled into a prioritized action plan utilized in future stages.

In the Prepare stage, business owners follow through on business improvement and personal/financial planning action items formed in the discover stage. Examples of action items include the following:

  • Addressing weaknesses identified in the Discover stage, in the business, or in personal financial planning
  • Protecting value through planning documents and making sure appropriate insurance is in place
  • Analyzing and prioritizing projects to improve the value of the business, as identified in Discover stage
  • Developing strategies to increase liquidity and retirement savings

The last stage in the process is the Decide stage. At this point, business owners choose between continuing to drive additional value into the business or to sell it.

Through the value acceleration process, we help business owners build value into their businesses and liquidity into their lives.

If you are interested in learning more about value acceleration, please contact the business valuation services team. We would be happy to meet with you, answer any questions you may have, and provide you with information on upcoming value acceleration presentations.

Read more! In our next installment of the value acceleration blog series, we cover the Discover stage.

Article
The process: Value acceleration series part one (of five)

Read this if you are a business owner or are interested in business valuation. 

BerryDunn’s business valuation team recently authored a book titled A Field Guide to Business Valuation for Owners and Leaders of Private Companies. It is being published by Business Valuation Resources, the leading provider of valuation textbooks, in September. 

A book’s cover can say a lot about a book, and this one is no exception. The title of this book is A Field Guide to Business Valuation. We have organized the book like a field guide used by bird watchers, and encourage readers to keep it on hand as a reference. It doesn’t necessarily need to be read cover to cover. Jump around. If a question comes up about a particular topic, turn to the section that addresses that matter. Or, if learning all about business valuation sounds appealing, by all means read it cover to cover. You may find more to certain topics than you initially thought. Here are some of our notes about the book.

We wrote this book based on data from the field. It is based on our experiences helping business owners estimate, preserve, and increase business value. We work with people who don’t have a business valuation background. We regularly use simple analogies to help people understand complicated topics. We get used to answering the same questions that come up, and we have had many opportunities to hone our answers. After years of explaining business valuations in conversations and presentations, we wrote this book to provide more people with a greater understanding of how businesses are valued. 

This book is intended for business owners and their advisors who would like to learn more about how to estimate what a business is worth, what factors affect value, and how to make businesses more valuable. After reading this book, the reader should be conversant in business valuations and comfortable with the overall valuation framework. It is not an exhaustive dissertation on business valuation. There are many other (very thick) books that get into the details, picking up where this book leaves off. This book is for people who want an understanding of how businesses are valued but don’t have the time to read heavy textbooks. 

The book is designed for people who want to learn how to perform valuations themselves. While it doesn’t contain all the details necessary to master the craft of business valuation, it is a great introduction to the topic. 

Our focus is on the valuation of privately held businesses, not publicly traded companies. Public companies can be valued based on their stock prices or various intrinsic valuation models. The value of private and public companies is affected by different factors. 

We hope this book answers questions, provides new insights, and is an enjoyable read. Stay tuned for more details about availability and opportunities to learn more about the content. If you are interested in learning more, please contact Seth Webber or Casey Karlsen.

Article
We wrote the book on business valuation—and it's available now

Read this if you are looking to buy or sell a construction company.

This article was previously published in Construction Accounting and Taxation, January/February 2022 ©2022 Thomson Reuters/Tax & Accounting.

The other day, my wife was telling me about her dad’s friend who used to be a daredevil backcountry skier. He loved cliff drops and had a reckless approach, once quipping, “I’ll find a landing spot on the way down.” 

Our valuation team includes several expert skiers and snowboarders, but we have little in common with this approach. When we ski, we carefully assess the risks before taking action. Because we spent all day assessing risk, we’re far more likely to take a scouting run and develop a couple of alternatives. Even in our wildest days, we would never go off cliffs without first investigating the landing.  

The same approach should be used when acquiring a business. Acquiring a business can be a big financial risk, possibly the biggest financial risk of one’s life. It might even feel like skiing off a cliff. We frequently work with clients that are acquiring businesses, and we recommend a strategy of investigation and analysis, carefully vetting potential acquisitions, before taking action. 

Recent M&A activity

The pandemic caused a drop-off in merger and acquisition (M&A) activity as many companies were focused on the challenges immediately at hand. As shown in the accompanying chart, the sale of construction companies reported in the DealStats database1 dropped by approximately 53% in 2020. 

As the business environment settles down to the “new normal,” M&A activity will likely begin to pick up again. An opportunity created by the pandemic is the opportunity to acquire struggling companies at a discount. Some companies are unable (or unwilling) to adapt to the new business environment and its many challenges. This fact pattern may represent an opportunity for stabilized companies to expand through acquisition. 

There are numerous other reasons to acquire a business. One common reason historically is to expand into a new service area. For example, one of our clients wanted to expand into concrete services, so they acquired a concrete contractor rather than developing those skills in-house. Another residential builder decided to eliminate a bottleneck in the building process by acquiring a roofing contractor. 

Particularly in the current tight labor market, we have observed numerous “acquihires” where the primary motivation for a deal is to secure a key person or team of employees – particularly for in-demand specialty subcontractors. 

Companies also use acquisitions as an opportunity to establish a new geographical footprint. This strategy is especially useful when ties to the community are important in the business development process. The motivation for an acquisition might also be access to a particular client or access to a new niche. 

Growing through acquisition can enable companies to achieve economies of scale and synergistic benefits through elimination of redundancies. Acquiring a competitor may also yield a secondary benefit by eliminating a source of competition. 

All of these opportunities may paint an overoptimistic picture of the benefits of mergers and acquisitions. According to Harvard Business Review, approximately 70% to 90% of acquisitions fail to realize their targeted outcomes.2  There are a myriad of factors that can cause acquisitions to go awry. Keep the following tips in mind that we have learned from our experience working with companies that completed a successful acquisition. 

Tip #1: Avoid being rushed

Acquiring a business is a big decision that will change the trajectory of the acquirer. If one is rushed into a decision, it is easier to miss key pieces of information. If there is not enough time to learn about the business model and make a careful decision, pass on the acquisition. There will always be future opportunities.

Tip #2: Perform rigorous financial due diligence

Two primary factors drive business value: income and risk. Financial due diligence is the process of verifying income and assessing risk. We recommend having a financial due diligence checklist as an organized method to analyze a company that one is acquiring. By following this checklist, one can learn about a company’s income, assets, liabilities, contracts, benefits, and potential problems (customer concentration, claims and litigation issues, management bench strength, etc.). To perform adequate due diligence, request thorough documentation and dig deep. 

We once helped an individual out who was considering acquiring a business that had very limited financial information available. The seller painted a glowing picture of profitability but lacked the financial data to back the claims. With a significant investment on the line, the potential acquirer judiciously passed on this opportunity. He felt that it wasn’t prudent to rely on the word of a stranger in the absence of data. In order to make a good buying decision, require sellers to bring data to the table. Be skeptical. In one of our former careers in engineering, there was a common mantra – in God we trust, everyone else brings data. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

As part of the financial due diligence, review financial statements for at least the last five years. Audited financial statements are preferred. Additionally, request monthly contract schedules showing completed contracts and work-in-progress (WIP). Monthly contract schedules can provide information about the timing of projects, margins over time, information about change orders, billing practices, and the cadence of work for a particular company.

Success in the construction industry hinges on cash management. Construction firms need to bid contracts and manage operations such that they collect payment as soon as possible in order to avoid a liquidity crisis. A positive indicator is the presence of contract liabilities, which represent billings from customers in excess of revenue recognized to date. This “good liability” indicates that project managers are attentive and understand the business aspect of their roles and/or that company has well written contacts allowing them to bill advantageously. In combination with strong cash flows from operations and good working capital metrics, a contract liability in excess of any contract asset is a good indicator of a strong cash management position. 

On the other hand, the alternative is a contract asset. Contract assets, which are often characterized as “bad assets,” represent revenue recognized in excess of amounts billed. In other words, the company does not have an unconditional right to payment. This could be due to poor contract writing, inattention to scope-creep, difficulty negotiating change orders with clients, or just bad billing practices. Contract assets may also be generated in a manner that does not raise concern. For example, a company might work primarily with government entities and therefore be restricted in their ability to pre-bill. In any case, if contract assets are consistent and substantial, one should inquire into what is giving rise to this asset. 

In the event that contract assets are generated through poor business practices, an acquirer may be able to implement their own billing practices to improve the target’s position, but existing poorly written contracts could pose a large liability and claim on cash flow post-merger. 

Tip #3: Analyze key relationships

A valuable component of intangible value is customer relationships. The most valuable customer base is one that is diversified and stable, ideally with contracts in place. Before acquiring a company, assess the risk associated with its customer base by analyzing concentration and the tenure of relationships with key customers. In some cases, customer reviews may also be available through Google and other platforms. 

Relationships with surety and bonding companies as well as subcontractors should also be topics in due diligence. 

Tip #4: Learn about the employees

Many businesses rightly state, “Our employees are our most valuable asset.” What if this valuable asset becomes disgruntled and walks away after a transaction? We recommend probing employee turnover and satisfaction, as well as analyzing employment contracts. External resources may also be available, or discussions with key customers and subcontractors can be revealing. 

Oftentimes, post-merger integration is unsuccessful due to differences in the cultures between the acquirer and the target. During the due diligence process, learn about the target’s culture and consider how it will likely integrate with your company’s existing culture. 

Tip #5: Assess key person dependence

Many companies cannot operate without the current owner in the driver’s seat. Many key processes, business development in particular, run through this individual. Develop an understanding of what would happen to the business without this person’s involvement. The individual in question (the “key person”) might not be the owner, but a key employee that is essential to business operations. Key person dependence represents a threat to the company in the event of the employee’s departure from the company or incapacitation. 

Some questions we often ask to identify and assess key person dependence include the following: 

  • Who is responsible for business development?
  • How important are individual relationships to the development of new work?
  • Do people become customers because of the reputation of the company or the reputation of an individual?
  • Has management began training up the next level of management beneath them?
  • Do any employees have any specialized knowledge or skills that no other employees have that would be difficult to replace?
  • What would happen to the company if a key employee won the lottery and never came into work again?

Tip #6: Have the seller stick around

Business owners are steeped in the knowledge of their business. This know-how may take time to transfer. Signing the seller to an employment agreement and/or earn-out as part of the transaction can provide the acquirer critical time to absorb the seller’s expertise. 

Tip #7: Don’t assume the good times will last forever

Many construction companies have reported strong profitability despite the pandemic. These profits may simply reflect recent economic trends rather than strong business models. If, or when, the economy takes another drop, many businesses will follow suit. Will the business being purchased survive in a difficult economic climate? To answer this question, consider the following strategies.

First, study how they performed in the last economic recession, keeping in mind the rule of thumb that construction industry downturns generally lag two years behind the rest of the economy and last twice as long. Second, compare a company’s growth and profitability to its industry to reveal whether it is a star or simply rising with the tide. In the words of Warren Buffett, “It’s only when the tide goes out that you learn who’s been swimming naked.” Third, study the business model to link their business drivers to economic factors. 

Tip #8: Consider tax and legal consequences

Many people focus their time and energy negotiating the transaction price and disregard the transaction structure. The amount of taxes paid may increase or decrease dramatically based on the transaction structure. However, tax consequences are often given less attention because they are frustrating and complicated. By spending a little extra time on the transaction structure, acquirers can optimize their after-tax sale proceeds. 

Different deal structures may also sever existing liability or create nightmares in the future. Be sure to discuss these with your legal counsel and weigh the potential risks and returns of structure.

Tip #9: Get different perspectives

Discuss the opportunity with trusted friends, families, and mentors. Bringing in different perspectives can cast light on elements that would otherwise have gone unnoticed.  

Bring in professional perspectives as well for tax, legal, and financial items. Contact a professional regarding the purchase price. Businesses are tricky to value. Two people can have disparate opinions about what it is worth. A business valuation can ground the expectations on price and provide a framework to keep “deal emotions” in check. A business valuation could save a considerable amount of money and time. 

We offer this word of caution: avoid blindly relying on the perspectives of others. Bring them in as counsel, but make sure to have a firm understanding of the offered terms and the business model yourself. Think critically about the decision to buy or walk away as the choice is yours to make. 

Conclusion

In both skiing and acquiring a business, we recommend taking calculated risks. Acquiring a business is a big decision and should be taken seriously. There are many benefits to M&A activity, including expanding services offerings, geographical footprint, employee base, and ultimately profitability. In order to ensure the full benefits of a successful acquisition, keep in mind the advice in this discussion when considering acquiring a company. 

1DealStats is a subscription-based database of business transactions available online at www.bvresources.com/.   
2“The Big Idea: The New M&A Playbook” by Clayton M. Christensen, Richard Alton, Curtis Rising, and Andrew Waldeck. Harvard Business Review, March 2011. Accessed online at https://hbr.org/2011/03/the-big-idea-the-new-ma-playbook

Article
Tips for acquiring a construction company

If you received over $2 million in PPP funds, read on.

The Small Business Administration (SBA) has posted a new form to collect additional information on loan necessity from businesses that received over $2 million in PPP funds. The comment period is now open and closes on November 25, 2020. As we seek more clarity, here is what we know.

What is happening: 

The SBA released PPP Loan Necessity Questionnaires (Forms 3509 and 3510) for borrowers that received PPP loans of $2 million or more on October 30, 2020. The forms are not available at the SBA or Treasury websites, but were released through the PPP Loan Forgiveness portal to lenders.  

Here is an excellent description of what we know thus far. Here are our concerns: 

  • The timing and lack of clarity. The 10-day turnaround is very tight. It could be very difficult to manage if it hits during a month or quarter close, or even worse at year-end.

  • This is counter to what was described in the FAQs at the time, so it leaves us with many unanswered questions.
  • It appears that information on the form might be subject to FOIA. There is a toggle to indicate what information you consider to be confidential. We recommend that you carefully review what information you have not flagged as confidential before submitting the form.

Other considerations and actions you can take in the meantime:

  • We know that the questionnaire is triggered by submitting an application for forgiveness. Given some of the uncertainty of other program impacts and this additional information that is requested, it may be reasonable to wait to seek loan forgiveness until we determine the impact.
  • You may wish to comment on the federal notice. See instructions for submitting comments below.

COVID-19 business support

We will continue to post updates as we uncover them. Let us know if you have questions. For more information regarding the Paycheck Protection Program, the CARES Act, or other COVID-19 resources, see our COVID-19 Resource Center.

Instructions for submitting comments:
Agency Clearance Officer                  
Curtis Rich
Small Business Administration
409 3rd Street SW
5th Floor
Washington, DC 20416

and 

SBA Desk Officer
Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs
Office of Management and Budget
New Executive Office Building
Washington, DC  20503

Your comments should be titled as follows:
Title: Paycheck Protection Program
OMB Control Number: 3245-0407

Comments should include one or all of the following: 
(a) whether the collection of information is necessary, 
(b) whether the estimate of 1.6 hours to complete or review the proposed application form is accurate (42,000 applications, 67,833 annual hour burden), 
(c) whether there are ways to minimize this burden, and
(d) whether there are ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information.

Article
Paycheck Protection Program: New regulatory announcements

Read this if your company is seeking assistance under the PPP.

The rules surrounding PPP continue to rapidly evolve. As of June 22, 2020, we are anticipating some additional clarifications in the form of an interim final rule (or IFR) and additional answers to frequently asked questions (FAQ). The FAQs were last updated on May 27, 2020. For the latest information, please be sure to check our website or the Treasury website.

A few important changes:

  1. The loan forgiveness application, and instructions, have been updated.
  2. There is a new EZ form, designed to streamline the forgiveness process, if borrowers meet certain criteria.
  3. Changes now allow for businesses to use 60% of the PPP loan proceeds on payroll costs, down from 75%.
  4. Businesses now have 24 weeks to use the loan proceeds, rather than the original eight-week period (or by December 31, 2020, whichever comes earlier).
  5. The rules around what is a full-time equivalent (FTE) employee and the safe harbors with respect to employment levels and forgiveness have been clarified.
  6. Entities can defer payroll taxes through the ERC program, even if forgiveness is granted.

These changes are designed to make it easier to qualify for loan forgiveness. In the event you do not qualify for loan forgiveness, you may be able to extend the loan to five years, as opposed to the original two years.

The relaxation on FTE reductions is significant. The reductions will NOT count against you when calculating forgiveness, even if you haven’t restored the same employment level, if you can document that:

  • you offered employment to people and they refused to come back, or
  • HHS, CDC, OSHA or other government intervention causes an inability to “return to the same level of business activity” as of 2/15/2020.

As of June 20, 2020, there was still an additional $128 billion in available funds. The program is intended to fund new loans through June 30, 2020. 

We’re here to help.
If you have questions about the PPP, contact a BerryDunn professional.

Article
PPP loan forgiveness: Updates

Read this if your company is seeking assistance under the PPP.

With additional funding for the PPP pending, we’re updating this blog post with more recent information.


This information is current as of April 21, 2020.

The Treasury Department has issued guidance and answers to Frequently Asked Questions that alters some of the original assumptions around PPP:

  1. At least 75% of the forgiven amount should be used for payroll (changed due to anticipated high demand for program)
  2. Repayment of non-forgiven amounts are now repaid over 2 years at 1.0% interest (not 2 years and 0.5% as previously stated or 10 years and 4% as in the CARES Act)

Although the “covered period” is February 15, 2020 to June 30, 2020, forgiveness of the loan is based on expenses (primarily payroll) during the eight-week period after the loan is received. Loan amounts should be disbursed within 10 calendar days of being approved.

Important to note:

  1. Questions around size:
    1. 500 employees. The SBA has clarified that it measures employees consistent with the existing 7(a) loan program guidance. See CFR Section 121.106 for details.
    2. The SBA has also clarified that if a business meets both tests in the “alternative size standard”, it qualifies to participate in the program
      1. Maximum tangible net worth of the business is not more than $15 million.
      2. Average net income after Federal income taxes for the two full fiscal years before the date of application is not more than $5 million. 
    3. If the existing SBA definition of a small business for your industry (found on SBA websites) has over 500 employees, your business may qualify if you meet that expanded definition. 
  2. The CARES Act states that loans taken from January 31, 2020, until “covered loans are made available may be refinanced as part of a covered loan.”
  3. People may want to tap into available credit now. If they are granted a covered loan (PPP loan), they can refinance. Given anticipated demand, it may take time to get the PPP loan processed.
  4. Participation in PPP (Section 1102 and 1106 of the CARES Act) precludes participation in the Employee Retention Credit (Section 2301).
  5. The IRS clarified that companies may still defer Payment of Employer Payroll Taxes (Section 2302) even if participating in PPP until a decision on forgiveness is reached by your lender. This is a change from our prior understanding.

Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL)

EIDLs are available through the SBA and were expanded under section 1110 of the CARES Act. Eligible are businesses with 500 or fewer employees, including ESOPs, cooperatives, and others. Up to $2 million per loan. Up to 30 years to repay. Comes with an emergency advance (available within 3 days) of $10,000 that does not have to be repaid – even if your loan application is turned down. This $10,000 does not impact participation in other programs/sections of the CARES Act. Some portion of the EIDL may reduce your loan forgiveness under PPP, but receiving an EIDL does not preclude you from participating in the PPP.

From the Treasury: Small business PPP

The Paycheck Protection Program provides small businesses with funds to pay up to 8 weeks of payroll costs including benefits. Funds can also be used to pay interest on mortgages, rent, and utilities. More details at treasury.gov.

Fully forgiven

Funds are provided in the form of loans that will be fully forgiven when used for payroll costs, interest on mortgages, rent, and utilities (due to likely high subscription, at least 75% of the forgiven amount must have been used for payroll). Loan payments will also be deferred for six months. No collateral or personal guarantees are required. Neither the government nor lenders will charge small businesses any fees.

Must keep employees on the payroll—or rehire quickly

Forgiveness is based on the employer maintaining or quickly rehiring employees and maintaining salary levels. Forgiveness will be reduced if full-time headcount declines, or if salaries and wages decrease.

All small businesses eligible

Small businesses with 500 or fewer employees—including nonprofits, veterans organizations, tribal concerns, self-employed individuals, sole proprietorships, and independent contractors— are eligible. Businesses with more than 500 employees are eligible in certain industries.

When to apply

Starting April 3, 2020, small businesses and sole proprietorships can apply. Starting April 10, 2020, independent contractors and self-employed individuals can apply.

How to apply

You can apply through any existing SBA 7(a) lender or any federally insured depository institution, federally insured credit union, or Farm Credit System institution that is participating. Other regulated lenders will be available to make these loans once they are approved and enrolled in the program. You should consult with your local lender as to whether it is participating. All loans will have the same terms regardless of lender or borrower. Find a list of participating lenders and additional information and full terms at sba.gov.

The Paycheck Protection Program is implemented by the Small Business Administration with support from the Department of the Treasury. Lenders should also visit sba.gov or coronavirus.gov for more information.

BerryDunn COVID-19 resources

We’re here to help. If you have questions about the PPP, contact a BerryDunn professional.

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Updated: Funding for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP)