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Provider Relief Fund (PRF) reporting portal

01.28.21

Read this if you are a hospital or healthcare organization that has received Provider Relief Funds. 

The long-awaited Provider Relief Fund (PRF) Reporting Portal (the Portal) opened to providers on January 15, 2021. Unfortunately, the Portal is currently only open for the registration of providers. The home page for the Portal has information on what documentation is needed for registration as well as other frequently asked questions.

We recommend taking the time to review what is needed and register as soon as possible. Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA) has suggested the registration process will take approximately 20 minutes and must be completed in one session. The good news is providers will not need to keep checking the Portal to see when additional data can be entered as the Portal home page states that registered providers will be notified when they should re-enter the portal to report on the use of PRF funds.

Access the portal

The Provider Relief Fund (PRF) Reporting Portal is only compatible with the most current stable version of Edge, Chrome and Mozilla Firefox.

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BerryDunn experts and consultants

Our senior living and long-term care professionals have compiled this guide to financial resources for senior living providers, segregated by federal and state programs.

In this guide, you will receive a breakdown of the critical components of each program, related compliance requirements, payment and accounting considerations, and the provider type for which the program is available.

Included on the guide is a publication date. Please check back regularly for updates.

READ THE GUIDE NOW

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If you have any questions, please contact a member of our senior living consulting team.

Article
Senior living COVID-19 financial resources guide

Read this if you are a not-for-profit organization. 

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, on June 3, 2020, FASB issued an Accounting Standards Update (ASU) that granted a one-year effective date delay for NFPs to adopt the new revenue recognition standards (Topic 606). The ASU permitted NFPs that had not yet applied the revenue recognition standard to do so for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019. Many NFP’s choose to take advantage of this delay. 

However, the clock is ticking on FASB’s revenue recognition changes, as most NFP’s will have to adopt the revenue recognition changes shortly. With that in mind – let’s revisit Topic 606 and what it could mean for your organization. 

The overarching goal of the changes to revenue recognition is to converge disparate standards across industries, all while making the information more useful to users. The core principle of the standard is that “the organization should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of goods or service in an amount that reflects the payment for which the organization expects to be entitled for those goods and services.” 

A five-step process and a simplified approach 

To achieve that core principle, your organization will need to apply a five-step model to some of your revenues streams:

  1. Identify the contract(s) with a customer
  2. Identify the separate performance obligations
  3. Determine the transaction price
  4. Allocate the transaction price to the separate performance obligations
  5. Recognize revenue when or as a performance obligation is satisfied

While the process can be broken down into five simple steps, the task of reviewing revenue streams and specific contracts can be quite daunting in implementation.

Additional disclosures needed

Whether your organization is currently implementing, or soon will, you will want to make sure you understand the extensive disclosures required under the standards. Annual disclosures include the following:

  • Qualitative information about how economic factors affect the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flow
  • Opening and closing balances of contract assets, contract liabilities, and receivables from contracts with customers
  • Descriptions of performance obligations

We are here to help

We recognize the difficult task ahead for our clients in analyzing their multiple contract vehicles and revenue streams in implementing the new standards. To help our clients through the process, we are offering revenue standard workshops. This workshop can be tailored to your needs, with an in-depth meeting to review the standard, consider your significant revenue streams, and a walkthrough the five-step process. We will leave you with an easy to use template for analyzing future revenue streams along with recommendations for your current revenue recognition system and process. 

Don’t wait until the financial year has come to a close to review your processes and systems in place, we are available now to work with you to prepare for the new standard. Contact Chris Mouradian or Sarah Belliveau to find out how you can join the list of organizations getting ahead of the new standard.

Article
Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) revenue recognition changes: What it means for NFPs

Read this if you are an employer with a defined contribution plan.

This article is the fourth in a series to help employee benefit plan fiduciaries better understand their responsibilities and manage the risks of non-compliance with Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) requirements. You can read the previous articles here.

One of the most common errors we identify during an audit of defined contribution plans is the definition of compensation outlined in the adoption agreement or plan document is not consistently or accurately applied by the plan sponsor. This can be a serious problem, as operational failures will require correction and those errors can become costly for plan sponsors. 

Calculation challenges and other common errors

It is important plan sponsors understand the options selected for the calculation of employee elective deferrals and employer non-elective and matching contributions into the plan. While calculating compensation sounds straightforward, it is often complicated by the fact that your adoption agreement or plan document may use different definitions of compensation for different purposes.

For example, the definition of compensation used to calculate deferrals could differ from the definition used for nondiscrimination testing and allocation purposes. Therefore, determining the correct amount of compensation requires a strong understanding of both your entity’s payroll structure and adoption agreement or plan document. Plan sponsors should work with both in-house personnel and plan administrators to ensure definitions of compensation are appropriately applied, and that any changes are quickly communicated to all involved.  

During an audit, we commonly identify pay types excluded from the definition of compensation in the adoption agreement or plan document that are incorrectly included in the compensation used in the calculation of employee deferrals and employer contributions. Taxable group term life insurance is a common example of compensation that is improperly included in the definition of compensation. Alternatively, we also identify codes for certain types of pay excluded from the calculation of employee deferrals and employer contributions that should be included based on the applicable definition of compensation. For example, retro pay, bonus payments, and manual checks are often incorrectly excluded in the definition of compensation.

Corrective actions

If errors are identified, we recommend that corrective actions including contributions, reallocation, or distributions are made in accordance with the Department of Labor regulations in a timely fashion.

If appropriate, the plan sponsor should consider amending the plan to align with the definition of plan compensation currently used in practice. We also recommend plan sponsors perform annual reviews of plan operations to ensure compliance and avoid the costs that can accompany non-compliance.

If you have questions about your specific situation, please contact our Employee Benefits consulting team. We’re here to help.

Article
Plan compensation and contributions: Common errors and solutions to fix them

Read this if you are an employer with basic knowledge of benefit plans and want to learn more. 

This article is the third in a series to help employee benefit plan fiduciaries better understand their responsibilities and manage the risks of non-compliance with Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) requirements. Our first article covers the background of ERISA, while our second article covers the definitions and rules of parties-in-interest and prohibited transactions.

Form 5500 is an informational return filed annually with the US Department of Labor (DOL). The purpose of Form 5500 is to report information concerning the operation, funding, assets, and investments of pension and other employee benefit plans to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and DOL. All pension benefit plans covered by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), and, generally, health and welfare plans covering 100 or more participants are subject to filing Form 5500. Any retirement plan covering less than 100 participants at the beginning of the plan year may be able to file Form 5500-SF, Short Form Annual Return/Report of Small Employee Benefit Plan. Read on for important filing requirements, as noncompliance can result in substantial penalties assessed by both the DOL and IRS. 

Who has to file, and which Form 5500 is required?

Pension plans

The most common types of pension benefit plan filers include:

  • Retirement plans qualified under Internal Revenue Code (IRC) § 401(a)
  • Tax sheltered annuity plans under IRC § 403(b)(1) and 403(b)(7)
  • SIMPLE 401(k) Plan under IRC § 401(k)(11)
  • Direct Filing Entity (DFE)

Which Form 5500 you should file depends on the type of plan. Small plans covering less than 100 participants as of the beginning of the plan year will normally file a Form 5500-SF. Conversely, large plans, mainly those plans covering 100 or more participants as of the beginning of the plan year, will file Form 5500 as a general rule. 

Participants include all current employees eligible for the plan, former employees still covered, and deceased employees who have one or more beneficiaries eligible for or receiving benefits under the plan.

Welfare plans

Generally, all welfare benefit plans covered by ERISA are required to file a Form 5500. Common types of welfare benefit plans include but are not limited to medical, dental, life insurance, severance pay, disability, and scholarship funds.

Similar to pension plans, the required Form 5500 to be filed typically depends on whether the plan is a small plan with less than 100 participants at the beginning of the year, or a large plan with 100 or more participants at the beginning of the plan year. However, certain welfare benefit plans are not required to file an annual Form 5500, including, but not limited to:

  • Plans with fewer than 100 participants at the beginning of the plan year and that are unfunded, fully insured, or a combination of the two
  • Governmental plans 
  • Employee benefit plans maintained only to comply with workers’ compensation, unemployment compensation, or disability insurance laws

Participants for welfare benefit plans include current employees covered by the plan, former employees still covered, and deceased employees who have one or more beneficiaries receiving or entitled to receive benefits under the plan (e.g., COBRA). 

Required financial schedules for Form 5500

Small plans that do not file Form 5500-SF require the following schedules to be filed along with the Form 5500:

  • Schedule A—Insurance information
  • Schedule D—DFE/Participating plan information
  • Schedule I—Financial information for a small plan

Large plans require the following schedules in addition to small plan schedules:

  • Plan Audit (Accountant’s Opinion)
  • Schedule C—Service provider information
  • Schedule G—Financial transaction schedules
  • Schedule H—Financial information (instead of Schedule I)

Welfare plans with 100 or more participants that are unfunded, fully insured or a combination of the two are not required to attach Schedule H or an Accountant’s Opinion. Also, pension plans will attach Schedule SB or MB reporting actuarial information, if required, along with Schedule R reporting retirement plan information.

When to File

Form 5500 must be filed electronically by the last day of the seventh calendar month after the end of the plan year. However, a two and one-half months’ extension of time to file can be requested. Penalties may be assessed by both the IRS and the DOL for failure to file an annual Form 5500-series return. For 2020, the IRS penalty for late filing is $250 per day, up to a maximum of $150,000 (applies only to retirement plans), and the DOL penalty can run up to $2,233 per day, with no maximum. Therefore, it is very important to track participant counts and ensure compliance with filing deadlines.

If you have questions about your specific situation, please contact our employee benefit consulting team. We’re here to help.

Article
Form 5500: An overview

Read this if you are an employer looking for more information on the Employee Retention Credit (ERC).

As we previously wrote, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 expanded, retroactively to March 12th, 2020, the Employee Retention Credit (ERC) to include those otherwise eligible employers who also received Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans. For those employers, wages qualifying for the ERC include wages that were not paid for with proceeds from a forgiven PPP loan. 

IRS guidance released

Recently, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released guidance under Notice 2021-20 (the Notice) clarifying how eligible employers who also received a PPP loan during 2020 can retroactively claim the ERC. The Notice also formalizes and expands on prior IRS responses to FAQs and addresses changes made since the enactment of the Act; it contains 71 FAQs. The IRS has stated it will address calendar quarters in 2021 in later guidance.

Under the 2020 ERC rules, an eligible employer may receive a refundable credit equal to 50% of qualified wages and healthcare expenses (up to $10,000 of wages/health care expenses per employee in 2020) paid by a business or not-for-profit organization that experienced a full or partial suspension of their operations or a significant decline in gross receipts. For employers that received a PPP loan, Q&A 49 of the Notice outlines the IRS’ position on the interaction with the ERC for 2020. 

An eligible employer can elect which wages are used to calculate the ERC and which wages are used for PPP loan forgiveness. The Notice provides for a deemed election for any qualified wages  included in the amount reported as payroll costs on the PPP Loan Forgiveness Application, unless the included payroll costs exceed the amount needed for full forgiveness when considering only the entries on the application. The text of Q&A 49 appears to treat the minimum amount of payroll costs required for PPP loan forgiveness (i.e., 60%) as being the deemed election as long as there are other eligible non-payroll expenses reported on the application to account for the other 40% of loan forgiveness expenses.

Payroll costs reported on the PPP Loan Forgiveness Application: Examples

The examples make it clear the payroll costs reported on the PPP Loan Forgiveness Application and needed for loan forgiveness are generally excluded from the ERC calculations. The qualified wages included on the PPP Loan Forgiveness Application that may be included in the ERC calculations are partially impacted by the documented non-payroll expenses included in the PPP Loan Forgiveness Application. Following are a few examples from the Notice. Each example outlines the interaction between payroll costs reported on the PPP Loan Forgiveness Application and the qualified wages for the ERC.

Example #1: An employer received a PPP loan of $100,000 and has both payroll and non-payroll costs that far exceed the borrowed amount. The employer only reports payroll costs of $100,000 on the PPP Loan Forgiveness application to simplify the forgiveness process. The employer cannot use any of the $100,000 of payroll costs to claim the ERC. This is notwithstanding the fact that 100% forgiveness may have been achieved by reporting only $60,000 of payroll costs and the remaining $40,000 from non-payroll costs.   

Example #2: An employer received a PPP loan of $200,000. The employer submitted a PPP Loan Forgiveness Application and reported $250,000 of qualified wages as payroll costs in support of forgiveness of the entire PPP loan. The employer is deemed to have made an election not to take into account $200,000 of the qualified wages for purposes of the ERC, which was the amount of qualified wages included in the payroll costs reported on the PPP Loan Forgiveness Application up to (but not exceeding) the minimum amount of payroll costs. The employer is not treated as making a deemed election with respect to $50,000 of the qualified wages ($250,000 reported on the PPP Loan Forgiveness Application, minus the $200,000 PPP loan amount forgiven), and it may treat that amount as qualified wages for purposes of the ERC.

Example #3: An employer received a PPP loan of $200,000. The employer is an eligible employer and paid $200,000 of qualified wages that would qualify for the employee retention credit during the second and third quarters of 2020. The employer also paid other eligible expenses of $70,000. The employer submitted a PPP Loan Forgiveness Application and reported the $200,000 of qualified wages as payroll costs, as well as the $70,000 of other eligible expenses, in support of forgiveness of the entire PPP loan. In this case, the employer is deemed to have made an election not to take into account $130,000 of qualified wages for purposes of the ERC, which was the amount of qualified wages included in the payroll costs reported on the PPP Loan Forgiveness Application up to (but not exceeding) the minimum amount of payroll costs, together with the $70,000 of other eligible expenses reported on the PPP Loan Forgiveness Application, sufficient to support the amount of the PPP loan that was forgiven. As a result, $70,000 of the qualified wages reported as payroll costs may be treated as qualified wages for purposes of the ERC.

Key takeaway:

For purposes of PPP loan forgiveness, an employer must generally submit payroll expenses equal to at least 60% of the loan amount to maximize loan forgiveness and to maximize the available wages for the ERC. If an employer does not report non-payroll costs (or limits the amount it reports) on the PPP Loan Forgiveness Application then doing so will have a direct impact on the wages available for the ERC. 

An employer must also consider the payroll costs reported on the PPP Loan Forgiveness Application and the payroll costs necessary to maximize the ERC. For example, if an employer does not qualify for the ERC until the third quarter of 2020, it should consider limiting the amount of wages reported on the PPP Loan Forgiveness Application that are attributable to the third quarter in order to maximize the wages available for the ERC.

How to claim the Employee Retention Credit

An eligible employer that received a PPP loan and did not claim the ERC may file a Form 941-X, Adjusted Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return for the relevant calendar quarters in which the employer paid qualified wages, but only for qualified wages for which no deemed election was made. 

Form 941-X may also be used by eligible employers who did not receive a PPP loan for 2020, but subsequently decide to claim any ERC to which they are entitled for 2020. 

The deadline for filing Form 941-X is generally within three years of the date Form 941 was filed or two years from the date you paid the tax reported on Form 941, whichever is later.

For more information

If you have more questions, or have a specific question about your situation, please call us. We’re here to help.

Article
IRS guidance: Retroactively claiming the 2020 ERC

Read this if your organization has to comply with HIPAA.

We have been monitoring HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) settlements as part of the HIPAA Right of Access Initiative (16 settlements and counting) and want to dispel some myths about HIPAA enforcement. Myths can be scary. It would be pretty frightening to run into Bigfoot while taking a stroll through the woods, but sometimes myths have the opposite effect, and we become complacent, thinking Bigfoot will never sneak up behind us. He’s just a myth, right?

As we offer our top five HIPAA myths, we invite you to decide whether to address gaps in compliance now, or wait until you are in the middle of the woods, facing Bigfoot, and wondering what to do next.

Myth #1: OCR doesn’t target organizations like mine.

The prevailing wisdom has been that the Office for Civil Rights only pursues settlements with large organizations. As we review the types of organizations that have been targeted in the recent past, we find that they include social services/behavioral health organizations, more than one primary care practice, a psychiatric medical group practice, and a few hospital/health systems. With settlements ranging from $10,000 to $200,000 plus up to two years of monitoring by the OCR, can you really afford to take a chance?

Myth #2: I have privacy policies, procedures, and training protocols documented, so I’m all set if OCR comes calling.

Are you really all set? When did you last review your policies and procedures? Are you sure what your staff actually does is HIPAA compliant? If you don’t regularly review your policies and procedures and train your staff, can you really say you’re all set?

Myth #3: HIPAA gives me 30 days to respond to a patient request, so it’s ok to wait to respond.

Did you try to ship a package during the 2020 holiday season? If so, do you remember checking your tracking number daily to see if your gift was any closer to its destination? Now imagine it was your health records you were waiting for. Frustration builds, goodwill wanes, and you start looking for a higher authority to get involved. 

And beware: if proposed Privacy Rule changes to HIPAA are finalized, the period of time covered entities will have to fulfill patient requests will be reduced from 30 to 15 days.

Myth #4: If I ignore the problem, it will go away.

Right of Access settlement #10 dispels this myth: A medical group was approached by OCR to resolve a complaint in March 2019. Then again in April 2019. This issue was not resolved until October 2020. Now, in addition to a monetary settlement, the group’s Corrective Action Plan (CAP) will be monitored by the OCR for two years. That’s a lot of time, energy, and money that could have been better spent if they worked to resolve the complaint quickly.

Myth #5: OCR will give me a “get out of jail free” card during the pandemic.

As one of our co-workers said, “Just because they are looking aside does not mean they are looking away.” The most recent settlement we have seen to OCR’s Right of Access Initiative was announced February 10, 2021, showing that the initiative is still a priority despite the pandemic.

Are you ready to assess or improve your compliance with HIPAA Right of Access rules now? Contact me and I will help you keep OCR settlements at bay. 

Article
Debunking the myths of HIPAA: Five steps to better compliance

Read this if your organization has received assistance from the Provider Relief Fund.

On January 15, 2021 the US Department of Health & Human Services released updated guidance on the Provider Relief Fund (PRF) reporting requirements. Below, we outline what has changed and supersedes their last communication on November 2, 2020.

This amended guidance is in response to the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act (Act). The act was passed in December 2020 and added an additional $3 billion to the PRF along with new language regarding reporting requirements. 

Highlights

Please note this is a summary of information and additional detail and guidance that can be found on the Reporting Requirements and Auditing page at HHS.gov. See our helpful infographic for a summary of key deadlines and reporting requirements. 

  • On January 15, 2021 The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced a delay in reporting of the PRF. Further details on the deadline for this reporting have not yet been communicated by HHS. Recipients of PRF payments greater than $10,000 may register to report on use of funds as of December 31, 2020 starting January 15, 2021. Providers should go into the portal and register and establish an account now so when the portal is open for reporting they are prepared to fulfil their reporting requirements.
  • Recipients who have not used all of the funds after December 31, 2020, have six more months from January 1 – June 30, 2021 to use remaining funds. Provider organizations will have to submit a second report before July 31, 2021 on how funds were utilized for that six-month period. 
  • The new guidelines further define the reporting entity and how to report if there is a parent company with subsidiaries for both general and targeted distributions:
     
    • Parent organizations with multiple TINs that either received general distributions or received them from parent organizations can report the usage of these funds even if the parent was not the entity that completed the attestation.
    • While a targeted distribution may now be transferred from the receiving subsidiary to another subsidiary by the parent organization, the original subsidiary must report any of the targeted distribution it received that was transferred.
       
  • The calculation of lost revenue has been modified by HHS through this new guidance. Lost revenue is calculated for the full year and can be calculated as follows:
     
    1. Difference between 2019 and 2020 actual client/resident/patient care revenue. The revenue must be submitted by client/resident/patient care mix and by quarter for the 2019 year.
    2. Difference between 2020 budgeted and 2020 actual. The budget must have been established and approved prior to March 27, 2020 and this budget, as well as an attestation from the CEO or CFO that this budget was submitted and approved prior to March 27, 2020, will have to be submitted.
    3. Reasonable method of estimating revenue. An explanation of the methodology, why it is reasonable and how the lost revenue was caused by coronavirus and not another source will need to be submitted. This method will likely fall under increased scrutiny through an audit by the Health Resources & Services Administration.
       
  • Recipients with unexpended PRF funds in full after the end of calendar year 2020, have an additional six months to utilize remaining funds for expenses or lost revenue attributable to coronavirus in an amount not to exceed the difference between:
     
    • 2019 Quarter 1 to Quarter 2 and 2021 Quarter 1 to Quarter 2 actual revenue,
    • 2020 Quarter 1 to Quarter 2 budgeted revenue and 2021 Quarter 1 to Quarter 2 actual revenue.

Next steps

In the wake of this new guidance, providers should undertake the following steps:

  • Register in the HHS portal and establish an account as soon as possible.
  • Revisit lost revenue calculations to determine if current methodology is appropriate or if an updated methodology would be more appropriate under the new guidance.
  • Understand the ability to transfer general and targeted distributions and the impact on reporting of these funds.
  • Develop reporting procedures for lost revenue and increased expense for reporting in the HHS portal.

If you have questions about accounting for, or reporting on, funds that you have received as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, please contact a member of our team. We’re here to help.

Article
Coronavirus Response and Relief Act impacts on the HHS Provider Relief Fund

Read this if you are a community bank.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) recently issued its fourth quarter 2020 Quarterly Banking Profile. The report provides financial information based on call reports filed by 5,001 FDIC-insured commercial banks and savings institutions. The report also contains a section specific to community bank performance. In fourth quarter 2020, this includes the financial information of 4,559 FDIC-insured community banks. Here are our key takeaways from the community bank section of the report:

  • There was a $1.3 billion increase in quarterly net income from a year prior despite a 38.1% increase in provision expense and continued net interest margin (NIM) compression. This increase was mainly due to loan sales, which were up 159.2% from 2019. Year-over-year, net income is up 3.6%. However, the percentage of unprofitable community banks rose from 3.7% in 2019 to 4.4% in 2020.
  • Provision expense for the year increased $4.1 billion (a 141.6% increase) from 2019.
  • Year-over-year NIM declined 27 basis points to 3.39%. The average yield on earning assets fell 61 basis points to 4.00%.
  • Net operating revenue increased by $3.4 billion from fourth quarter 2019, a 14.5% increase. This increase is attributable to higher revenue from loan sales (increased $1.8 billion, or 159.2%) and an increase in net interest income.
  • Non-interest expenses increased 10.4% from fourth quarter 2019. This increase was mainly attributable to salary and benefit expenses, which saw an increase of $1.1 billion (12.6%). That being said, average assets per employee increased 16% from fourth quarter 2019.
  • Trends in loans and leases showed a moderate contraction from third quarter 2020, decreasing by 1.6%. This contraction was mainly seen in the C&I loan category, which was driven by a reduction in Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan balances. However, total loans and leases increased by 10.3% from fourth quarter 2019. Although all major loan categories expanded in 2020, the majority of growth was seen in C&I loans, which accounted for approximately two-thirds of the year-over-year increase in loans and leases. However, keep in mind, C&I loans include PPP loans that were originated in the first half of 2020.
  • Nearly all community banks reported an increase in deposit volume during the year. Growth in deposits above the insurance limit drove the annual increase while alternative funding sources, such as brokered deposits, declined.
  • Average funding costs fell 33 basis points to 61 basis points for 2020.
  • Noncurrent loans (loans 90 days or more past due or in nonaccrual status) increased $1.5 billion (12.8%) from fourth quarter 2019 as noncurrent balances in all major loan categories grew. However, the noncurrent rate remained relatively stable compared to fourth quarter 2019 at 77 basis points, partly due to strong year-over-year loan growth.
  • Net charge-offs decreased 4 basis points from fourth quarter 2019 to 15 basis points. The net charge-off rate for C&I loans declined most among major loan categories having decreased 24 basis points.
  • The average community bank leverage ratio (CBLR) for the 1,844 banks that elected to use the CBLR framework was 11.2%.
  • The number of community banks declined by 31 to 4,559 from third quarter 2020. This change includes two new community banks, four banks transitioning from non-community to community banks, three banks transitioning from community to non-community banks, 30 community bank mergers or consolidations, two community bank self-liquidations, and two community bank failures.

2020 was a strong year for community banks, as evidenced by the increase in year-over-year net income of 3.6%. However, tightening NIMs will force community banks to either find creative ways to increase their NIM, grow their earning asset bases, or find ways to continue to increase non-interest income to maintain current net income levels. Some community banks have already started dedicating more time to non-traditional income streams, as evidenced by the 40.1% year-over-year increase in non-interest income.

Furthermore, much uncertainty still exists. For instance, although significant charge-offs have not yet materialized, the financial picture for many borrowers remains uncertain. And payment deferrals have made some credit quality indicators, such as past due status, less reliable. The ability of community banks to maintain relationships with their borrowers and remain apprised of the results of their borrowers’ operations has never been more important.

As always, please don’t hesitate to reach out to BerryDunn’s Financial Services team if you have any questions. We're here to help.
 

Article
FDIC issues its fourth quarter 2020 Quarterly Banking Profile