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COVID-
19 telehealth changes: Every charge counts

04.21.20

Read this if you are considering adding telehealth services, or enhancing your your current telehealth services.

Consumer and provider’s perceptions and adoption of telehealth in the US have been mixed at best. The current COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated and supported broader use of non-face-to-face provider interactions. Payor changes will likely continue post-pandemic, and the communities we serve may expect more virtual care options.    

The regulatory changes necessitated by the pandemic provide new flexibility and options to serve our patients remotely and generate revenue. Leveraging this opportunity demands:

  • understanding each payor’s requirements, 
  • educating providers, 
  • creating revenue cycle processes, and
  • ensuring compliance with payor requirements. 

Providers need to understand the “flavors” of non-face-to-face visits, the payor requirements, and the significant payment differences. Simple documentation, modifier, and/or claim form omissions can mean the difference between being paid for a face-to-face office visit versus a non-chargeable service. The effort in getting it right today will have immediate benefits that should extend into post-pandemic operations.

The first step is researching and documenting each payor’s requirements. The rules and regulations are not the same for RHCs, FQHCs, Method II billing, and the different provider types such as physical therapists and MDs. Providers need to understand documentation, CPT/HCPC, modifier, place-of-service, video requirements versus audio only, and other nuances. Simplification of each payor’s rules into an easy-to-digest grid creates an invaluable tool for everyone involved. Below is an example of a payor grid:

Payor Sample payor 1 Sample payor 2
Video requirement waived? Yes No
Place of service 02 02 for 11
Virtual check-in/brief communication codes G2012 or G2010 G2012 or telephone E/M codes (G99441-99433)
Telehealth service codes All codes in CPT Appendix P All codes in CPT Appendix P, video required, use office POS
Modifier rules V3 required for audio only visits 95 or GT
Note Use G2012 for triage Payor notes that most appropriate level is 99212 or 99213

Other questions on payor requirements that may prove worth tracking:

  • Will cost shares be waived?
  • Is payor reimbursing at face-to-face rates?
  • Are telehealth services limited to established patients?
  • Are requirements around follow-up appointments bundled or not?
  • For organizations with multiple provider types, what claim type is required?

Every member of the revenue cycle must be involved to optimize telehealth services. Do not overlook the importance of registration, IT/system configuration (from a documentation and billing perspective), and physician education. Providers should consider simple flow charts to assist in operationalizing the rules by payor. For example (click to expand):   

Operationalize Telehealth Rules by Payor

The government relaxed HIPAA rules allowing providers many more options for telehealth technology (such as using Web-Ex, Skype, Zoom, and other readily available services). These options are of no value if not available and/or adopted by providers and patients. In terms of payment, the lack of a video component is often the difference between billing and being paid at the face-to-face in office rate versus a non-chargeable or minimal payment service. Some payors are allowing and paying audio-only visits at the office rate, which further highlights the need to understand the rules.  

Here is an example from Medicare showing the potential payment difference between an audio-only and video-enabled service:

Code Long description Medicare fee schedule rate
99442 Telephone evaluation and management service; 11-20 minutes of medical discussion. $27.82
99213 Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: an expanded problem focused history, an expanded problem focused examination, and/or medical decision making of low complexity.

Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
$77.15

In this example, the physician time is about 15 minutes with the patient. However, if video were used the payment would be 177 percent more. When you account for the number of physicians in your organization that are providing these visits every day times the payment difference, the delta is substantial. The payment difference is even more significant for other codes and payor rates (and further exacerbated by payers that do not pay for audio-only visits).

There are significant payment difference between the different codes that can be billed for telehealth visits by payor. These are difficult financial times for providers and every dollar counts. BerryDunn is available to help if you have questions around rules, regulations, and/or best practice processes around billing for these services. You can e-mail Denny Roberge or call 603.518.2623 with any questions or for assistance optimizing your telehealth program.

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Read this is if you are at a healthcare organization and considering telehealth options. 

Given the COVID-19 emergency declaration, telehealth service regulations have been greatly modified to provide flexibility and payment. The guidance on telehealth is very dispersed and can be difficult to navigate. Here are some FAQs based on the many questions we have received. If you have questions related to your specific situation, please contact us. We're here to help.

UPDATED: Are RHCs and FQHCs now eligible as distant site providers for telehealth services? If so, how will they be paid by Medicare?
Yes, the CARES Act includes RHCs and FQHCs as distant sites during the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency (PHE). Distant site telehealth services can be provided by any health care practitioner of the RHC or FQHC within their scope of practice. The practitioners can provide any distant site telehealth service that is approved as a distant site telehealth service under the Physician Fee Schedule (PFS) and from any location, including from the practitioner’s home. CMS has approved an interim payment rate of $92 for RHCs and FQHCs for these services. The rate is based on the average payment for all PFS telehealth services, weighted by the volume of those services paid under the PFS. This rate will apply for services furnished between January 27, 2020 and June 30, 2020. Modifier “95” must be included on the claim. In July 2020, these claims will be automatically reprocessed and be paid at the RHC all-inclusive rate (AIR) and the FQHC prospective payment system (PPS) rate. Reprocessing will begin when the Medicare claims processing system is updated for the new payment rate.

For telehealth distant site services furnished between July 1, 2020 and the end of the COVID-19 PHE, RHCs and FQHCs will need to use RHC/FQHC specific G code, G2025, for services provided via telehealth. These claims will be paid at the $92 rate, not the AIR or PPS rates. If the COVID-19 PHE continues beyond December 31, 2020, the $92 will be updated based on the 2021 PFS average payment rate for these services, again weighted by the volume of those services.

For services in which the coinsurance is waived, RHCs and FQHCs must put the “CS” modifier on the service line. RHC and FQHC claims with the “CS” modifier will be paid with the coinsurance applied, and the Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC) will automatically reprocess these claims beginning on July 1. Coinsurance should not be collected from beneficiaries if the coinsurance is waived.

UPDATED: Will telehealth visits of any kind affect my FQHC or RHC encounter rate?
Costs associated with telehealth will not affect the prospective payment system rate for FQHCs or the all-inclusive rate calculation for RHCs, but the costs will need to be reported on the cost report. Costs of originating and distant site telehealth services will be reported as follows:

  • Form CMS-222-17 on line 79 (Cost Other Than RHC Services) of Worksheet A for RHCs
  • Form CMS-224-14 on line 66 (Other FQHC Services) of Worksheet A for FQHCs.

What is telehealth versus telemedicine?
Telemedicine refers to a remote clinical service while telehealth is a broader term that embodies a consumer-based approach to medical care, incorporating both delivery of care and education of patients.

UPDATED: What types of service levels are available?
There are three main types of Medicare virtual services with different payment levels. Here are the key things to know for each type:

Telehealth visits

  1. These are considered the same as in-person visits and paid at the same PFS rates as regular, in-person visits.
  2. Pre-existing patient relationship requirements have been waived.
  3. The patient originating site can be any healthcare facility or the patient’s home.

Virtual check-ins

  1. These are brief communications in a variety of technology-based manners.
  2. They do require the patient to initiate and consent to the check-in.
  3. It cannot be preceded by a medical visit within the previous 7 days and cannot lead to a medical visit within the next 24 hours. 
  4. A pre-existing relationship with the patient is required.
  5. Common billing codes include HCPCS code G2012 (telephone) and G2010 (captured video or images).

E-visits:

  1. These also need to be initiated by the patient in order to be billable and would be conducted using online patient portals (no face-to-face), for example.
  2. A pre-existing relationship with the patient is required.
  3. Common billing codes include CPT codes 99421-99423 and HCPCS codes G2061-G2063. 

The payment rate for these services will be $24.76 beginning March 1, 2020, through the end of the PHE, instead of the CY 2020 rate of $13.53, and should be billed using code G0071. MACs will automatically reprocess any claims with G00771 furnished on or after March 1, 2020, that were not paid at the new rate.

What codes can be billed as telehealth services?
Here is the listing effective as of March 1, 2020. 

Since this time, 85 additional codes have been added. Click here for the list. 

Do we need to request an 1135 waiver or are these changes covered by a blanket waiver from CMS?
A blanket waiver is in effect, retroactive to March 1, 2020 though the end of the emergency declaration. 

Is patient consent required?
Yes, patients must verbally consent to services. This includes brief telecommunications (which currently have a cost share for Medicare). We recommend it for all payers as a best practice.

Is there additional information expected from Medicare?
Yes, Medicare, Medicaid, and other payers are continually updating their guidance. 

What can we bill for telehealth services for Medicaid and insurance carriers?
This is the most problematic to track as it is continually evolving and every state and carrier is different. Providers must understand each payor’s requirements around audio and video, allowable CPT/HCPCS codes, modifiers, and place of service codes. As you have questions, please reach out to us so we can be sure to provide the most current answer.

Resources
Given how quickly information related to telehealth is changing, please feel free to contact us for the latest resources. 

Article
Telehealth FAQs

Editor’s note: read this if you are a hospital or senior living facility administrator, CFO, finance director or manager, patient financial services staff, or revenue team member. 

Unless you own a working crystal ball, no one knows the true impact COVID-19 will have on our communities and our healthcare ecosystem. The very nature of being a healthcare provider demands being prepared for emergencies, crises, and pandemics. This particular pandemic highlights how critical yet fragile the healthcare system is in our country—and across the globe.

Despite differences in payment mechanisms, terminology, and cultural expectations, registration is a critical function shared with all developed health systems across the globe and must be considered when preparing for COVID-19 and other community disasters. This function is responsible for correctly identifying patients, managing where they are in the systems (arrivals, bed management, scheduling, and other functions), and accurately identifying financial responsibility for services provided.  

Insurance verification is important during crisis, but the other functions are more important, as they ensure providers have access to timely and correct medical information and can document each patient's course of treatment and transfer care to other providers. Delays and inaccuracy in upfront functions can lead to decreased patient throughput and possibly impede patient care if access to medical records is delayed.

Preparation for successful patient care

Now is a great time to assess if your system’s patient access teams are properly staffed and trained, and you have contingency plans in place for emergencies and pandemics. Many systems continue to staff their registration functions with entry level/inexperienced staff. Are they dependable and able to handle the high stress that can accompany a crisis in your community? Systems must have contingency plans and training in place before it is needed.

Patient access staffpeople are at the front end of care and we must ensure they have the training, equipment, and tools to protect themselves from sick patients (this is true every day). If there is a health emergency in your community, a high likelihood exists that your patient access staff will be impacted. What is your plan for decreased patient access staff during times of increased/unprecedented demand? Many options exist and preparation prior to a crisis is important to successfully care for patients during the crisis. Here are some options to consider:

  • Cross-train billing and coding staff to register patients
    Cross-train revenue cycle staff to improve the strength of your revenue cycle. Billers and coders that fully understand registration can problem solve and collaborate quickly during a crisis, saving valuable time and improving efficiency.
  • Develop mass registration processes
    Create forms and/or have mobile laptops and technology ready to register patients in conference rooms and other non-traditional access points. This eliminates bottlenecks at ED and other high-demand registration points, speeding up treatment.
  • Continue to invest in self-service and telehealth tools
    Telehealth and self-service registration tools can alleviate staff demands, prevent non-emergency patients from coming to the facility, and improve patient satisfaction.

Patient access assessments

Patient access has been and will continue to be the foundation of the revenue cycle. This is true during normal operations and even more so during emergency and crisis situations. When is the last time you assessed your system’s patient access emergency plans and overall performance of your patient access department?  

BerryDunn’s patient access consultants can assist in ensuring your front-end functions are performing at best-practice levels, based on registration related denials and rework, processes flows, point-of-service collections, authorizations, and other metrics. The assessment will identify financial and revenue cycle improvement opportunities dependent on your people, processes, and technology. Assessments will also review the department’s preparedness for emergencies and provide recommendations to support the needs of the community during normal operations and during a crisis.

For more information, or if you have questions or comments about your specific situation, we're here to help. Please contact our revenue cycle consultants.

Article
Preparing your revenue cycle for the pandemic: COVID-19

Read this if you use QuickBooks. 

Want to break up an estimate into multiple invoices? QuickBooks Online supports progress invoicing.

If you do large, multi-part projects for customers, you may not want to wait until absolutely everything is done before you send an invoice. This can be especially problematic when you have to purchase a lot of materials for a job that will eventually be billed to the customers.

QuickBooks Online has a solution for this: progress invoicing. Once you’ve had an estimate approved, you can split it into as many pieces as you need, sending partial invoices to your customer for products and services as you provide them, rather than waiting until the project is complete. If cash flow is a problem for you, this can be a very effective solution. You might be able to take on work that you otherwise couldn’t because you’ll be getting paid periodically.

Setup Required

Progress invoicing requires some special setup steps. First, you’ll need to see whether QuickBooks Online is prepared for the task. Click the gear icon in the upper right and select Account and settings under Your Company. Click the Sales tab and scroll down to Progress Invoicing. It may just say On to the right of Create multiple partial invoices from a single estimate. If it doesn’t, click the pencil icon to the right and turn it on. Then click Save and Done.

You’ll also have to choose a different template than the one you use for standard invoices. Click the gear icon and select Custom form styles. Click New style in the upper right and then click Invoice. Enter a new name for the template to replace My INVOICE Template, like Progress Invoice. Then click Dive in with a template or Change up the template under the Design tab. Select Airy new by clicking on it. This is the only template you can use for progress invoicing.

When you’re creating a template for your progress invoices, you’ll have to select Airy new.

Now, click on Edit print settings (or When in doubt, print it out). Make sure there’s no checkmark in the box in front of Fit printed form with pay stub in window envelope or Fit to window envelope. Then click on the Content tab. You’ll see a preview of the template (grayed out) to the right. Click the pencil icon in the middle section. Select the Show more activity options link at the bottom of the screen.

If you want to Group activity by (Day, Week, Month, or Type), check that box and select your preference. Go through the other options here and check or uncheck the boxes to meet your needs. Then click Done. You’ll see your new template in the list of Custom form styles.

QuickBooks Online allows you to designate one form style as the default. This is the form that will open when you create a new invoice or estimate template. If you plan to send a lot of progress invoices, you might want to make that the default. To do this, find your new template in the list on this page and click the down arrow next to Edit in the Action column. Click Make default. If you leave your standard invoice as the default, you can always switch when you’re creating an invoice by clicking the Customize button at the bottom of the screen.

Creating a Progress Invoice


You can see what your options are for your progress invoice.

Invoice and estimate forms in QuickBooks Online are very similar. The only major difference is that estimates contain a field for Expiration date. To start the process of progress invoicing, select an estimate that you want to bill that way. Click the Sales tab and select All Sales. Find your estimate and click on Create invoice in the Action column. A window like the one in the above image will appear.

You can bill a percentage of each line item or enter a custom amount for each line.  If you choose the latter, the invoice that opens will have zeroes in the Due column. You can alter the amount due for any of these by either a percentage or an amount and/or leave them at zero if you don’t want to bill a particular product or service. Either way, the Balance due will reflect your changes. When you’ve come to the last invoice for the project, you’ll check Remaining total of all lines.

Once you’ve chosen one of these options, click Create invoice. Double-check the form and then save it. You can now treat it as any other invoice. To see a list of your progress invoices, run the Estimates & Progress Invoicing Summary by Customer report.

As you can see, there are numerous steps involved in creating progress invoices. Each has to be done with precision, so the customer is billed the exact total amount due at the end. We can help you accomplish this. We’re also available to help with any other QuickBooks Online issues you have. Contact our Outsourced Accounting team to set up a consultation.

Article
How does progress invoicing work in QuickBooks Online?

Read this if you are a plan sponsor of employee benefit plans.

This article is the ninth in a series to help employee benefit plan fiduciaries better understand their responsibilities and manage the risks of non-compliance with Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) requirements. You can read the previous articles here

Employee benefit plan loan basics 

If your plan’s adoption agreement is set up to allow loans, participants can borrow against their account balance. Some participants may find this an attractive option as the interest they pay on the loan is returned to their retirement account as opposed to other loans where the interest is paid to the lender. 

Additionally, while interest is charged at the market rate, it may be lower than other options available to the participant, such as a credit card or other unsecured debt. Unlike hardship distributions, there are no restrictions on the circumstances under which a participant may take a loan. A potential downside is that if the borrower defaults on the loan or ends their employment and cannot repay the loan in full, it converts from a loan to a deemed distribution, potentially incurring taxes and penalties.

If a participant decides that an employee benefit plan loan is their best option, they will apply for the loan through your plan administrator. Loans are limited in both size and quantity. Participants may take loans up to 50% of their vested account balance with a maximum loan of $50,000. The provisions of a plan determine how many loans an employee may have at once; however, the combined loan balances cannot exceed 50% of the employee’s vested balance or $50,000. Furthermore, the $50,000 loan maximum must also consider payments made on loans within the previous 12 months.

Repayment of employee benefit plan loans

Repayment of employee benefit plan loans may be done through after tax payroll contributions, making it a relatively easy process for the participant. If a plan sponsor elects to provide this repayment option, they must ensure that repayments are remitted to the plan in a timely manner, just as they must with other employee funded contributions. The term of the loan is typically limited to five years and must be repaid in at least quarterly installments. However, a loan can be extended to as long as thirty years if specified within the plan’s loan policy. If the loan term is for longer than five years, the loan proceeds must be used to purchase a primary residence.

Like any source of debt, there are pros and cons to taking out an employee benefit plan loan, and it remains an important option for participants to understand. The benefits include the ease of applying for such a loan and loan interest that is then added to the participant’s retirement account balance. Potential pitfalls include lost earnings during the loan period and the risk of the loan becoming a deemed distribution if the participant is unable to repay within the allotted time. 

If you would like more information, or have specific questions about your specific situation, please contact our Employee Benefits Audit team.

Article
Retirement plan loans: A brief review

Read this if you have a blended workforce with both in-office employees and remote workers.

It is hard to believe it has been nearly a year and a half since we started our remote work journey. At the time, many thought the move to working remotely would be short term. Then, a couple of weeks turned into a month, a month into another month, another month into a year and, some employers are now finally considering re-opening their offices.

Back in April 2020, we provided some internal control challenges, and potential solutions, faced by working in a remote environment. These challenges included exercising appropriate tone at the top, maintaining appropriate segregation of duties, and ensuring timely review, amongst others. Although these challenges still exist, there are new considerations to address as we transition into (hopefully) a post-pandemic world.

Blended workforces

As we mentioned in that article, since people have now been forced to work in a remote environment, they will be more apt to continue to do so. For some employees, the perks of ditching that long commute outweighs the free coffee they receive in the office. Employers have a decision to make—do we allow our employees the option to continue to work from home or, do we require employees to work from the office, as was standard pre-pandemic? Now that employees have exhibited the ability to work from home efficiently and effectively, it may be difficult to move all employees back into the office. Requiring all employees to return to the office could result in employees seeking employment elsewhere, and the option to work remotely is a selling point for many recruiters. Furthermore, disallowing remote work could cause employees to feel distrusted or undervalued, possibly leading to less efficient and effective work.

However, remote work comes with many challenges. Although video chat has been instrumental in navigating the remote work environment, it still has limitations. Nothing can beat in-person conversations and the relationships they help build. Nearly every video chat has a purpose, and unfortunately, you can’t just “run” into somebody in a video chat as you can in the office. Building camaraderie and instilling your company’s culture is difficult in a remote environment. And, if your workforce is blended, with some working in the office while others work remotely, building culture may be even more difficult than if your entire workforce was remote. Employees in the office may be less apt to communicate with remote colleagues. If you have a task you wish to delegate, you may think of giving the assignment to someone in the office prior to thinking of your remote co-workers that may be just as able and willing to complete the assignment. It will be important to ensure all employees are provided with equal opportunities, no matter of where they work.

Remote work policy

Regardless of your company’s decision to allow employees to work remotely or not, we recommend developing a remote work policy addressing expected behaviors. When developing such a policy, consider:

  •  Will the policy’s provisions apply to the entire company or will there be different provisions by department? If the latter, consider what the implications may be on employee morale.
  • Will there be a minimum amount of days per week that must be spent in the office?
  • If employees are allowed to work remotely, do they need to work a set schedule or can the frequency, and which days they work remotely, change from week to week?
  • Who should the employee communicate their decision to? How will this information then be shared company-wide?
  • How do remote employees address document destruction? If they are handling sensitive and confidential documents, how should they dispose of these documents?
  • Similarly, what are the expectations for protecting sensitive and confidential information at home?
  • Are employees allowed to hook up company-provided equipment to personal devices, such as personal printers?
  • If an employee is customer/client facing, what are the expectations for dress code and backgrounds for video chat meetings?
  • What will staff development look like for individuals working remotely? Alternatively, what will their involvement look like in onboarding/developing new employees?
  • What are the expectations for meetings? Will all meetings be set up in a manner that accommodates in-person and remote attendees? Are there meetings where in-person attendance is mandatory?

The importance of these considerations will likely differ from company to company. Some of these considerations may be addressed in other, already existing policies.

Are your internal controls “blended workforce” ready?

If your company plans to allow employees to work remotely, you will need to assess if your internal controls make sense for both in-office and remote employees. Typically, internal controls are written in a manner irrespective of where the employee resides. However, there may be situations that require an internal control be re-worked to accommodate in-office and remote employees. For instance, do you have an internal control that references a specific report that can only be run in-office? If the control owner plans to transition to a hybrid work schedule, does the frequency of the internal control need to change to reflect the employee’s new schedule? Alternatively, does it make sense to transition this internal control to someone else that will be in the office more frequently?

Internal control accommodations

The transition to a remote environment was expeditious and many thought the remote environment would be over quickly. As a result, there may have been modifications to internal controls that were made out of necessity, although they were not ideal from an internal control standpoint. The rationale for these accommodations may have been the expectation that the remote environment would be short-lived. Although these accommodations may have made sense for a short amount of time, and posed little to no additional risk to your company, the longer these accommodations remained in effect, the greater the chance for unintended consequences. 

We recommend reviewing your internal controls and creating a log of any internal control accommodations that were made due to the pandemic. Some of these modifications may continue to make sense and, after operating under the new internal control for an extended period of time, may even be preferable to the previous internal control. However, for those modifications that do appear to have increased control risk, control owners should assess if the length of the pandemic could have resulted in inadequately designed internal controls. And, if so, what could the consequences of these poorly designed internal controls have been to the company?

Internal control vs. process

While reviewing your company’s internal controls, it will also be a good time to ensure your internal control descriptions actually describe an internal control rather than simply a process. Although having well-documented processes for your company’s various transaction cycles is important, a good internal control description should already incorporate the process within it. Think of your internal control descriptions as writing a story—the “process” provides background information on the characters and setting, while the “internal control” is the story’s plot.

For example: The Accounting Manager downloads the market values from the investment portfolio accounting system and enters the market values into the general ledger on a monthly basis. Once the journal entry is entered, the Accounting Manager provides the market value report and a copy of the journal entry to the Controller.

Although a savvy reader may be able to identify where the internal control points are within this process, it could easily be modified to explicitly include discussion of the actual internal controls. The text in bold below represents modifications to the original:

The Accounting Manager downloads the market values from the investment portfolio accounting system and enters the market values into the general ledger on a monthly basis. Once the journal entry is entered, the Accounting Manager provides the market value report and a copy of the journal entry to the Controller via email. This email serves as documentation of preparation of the journal entry by the Accounting Manager. The Controller then reviews the market value report against the journal entry for accuracy. Once approved, the Controller posts the journal entry and replies to the email to indicate their review and approval. The Accounting Manager saves the email chain as auditable evidence.

The text additions in bold font help provide a complete story. A new employee could easily read this description and understand what they need to do, and how to appropriately document it. Most importantly, the internal control is both in-office and remote environment friendly.

Transitioning back to the office has resulted in a mixture of excitement and anxiety. Routine office norms, such as shaking hands and having a spontaneous meeting over a cup of coffee need to be relearned. Likewise, policies and internal controls need to be revisited to address the changing landscape. The more proactive your company can be, the better positioned it will be to accommodate its employees’ demands, while also maximizing the effectiveness of its internal controls. Please contact David Stone or Dan Vogt if any questions arise.

Article
May the "blended workforce be with you": Policy and internal control considerations for a new era

Read this if you are a plan sponsor of employee benefit plans.

This article is the eighth in a series to help employee benefit plan fiduciaries better understand their responsibilities and manage the risks of non-compliance with Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) requirements. You can read the previous articles here

The Department of Labor regulations regarding service provider fee disclosures clarify that plan fiduciaries are responsible for assessing the reasonableness of fees charged to plans in relation to services performed. 

Before a plan fiduciary is able to assess the reasonableness of plan fees, the fiduciary has to receive required fee disclosures from their covered service provider. A covered service provider is considered a party that enters into an agreement with a covered plan to provide certain services. The range of services provided generally include recordkeeping services, investment adviser services, accounting services, auditing services, actuarial services, appraisals, banking, consulting, legal services, third party administration services, or valuation services provided to the plan.

In general, the covered service providers are required to provide the plan fiduciary a disclosure of the following information:

  • All expected services and fees, and
  • All direct and indirect compensation
    • Direct compensation are fees paid to the service providers from the plan
    • Indirect compensation are fees paid to the service providers from sources other than the plan, the plan sponsor, the covered service provider, or an affiliate 

Once the service provider fee disclosures are received, the responsible plan fiduciary must assess the reasonableness of the fees in relation to the services provided. There are numerous ways a plan fiduciary can determine if the fees are reasonable. The following are some of the most common ways to determine if the plan expenses are reasonable:

  • Complete a Request for Proposal (RFP) or Request for Information (RFI) process that compares at least two vendors.
  • Complete a plan “benchmarking” project. The responsible plan fiduciary can have an independent organization compare the fees charged to the plan to plans of similar size and characteristics. Failure to determine the reasonableness of the fees charged can result in a prohibited transaction. The responsible plan fiduciary should determine and document whether the fees are reasonable. Documentation should also include the steps taken to make this determination.

It is important to remember that failure to assess the reasonableness of the service provider fees can result in a prohibited transaction. Documentation of the assessment process, including steps taken to make a determination on fee reasonableness, is the best way to avoid having a prohibited transaction.

If you have any questions while assessing your service providers’ fees, please contact our Employee Benefits Audit team.
 

Article
Service provider fee disclosures: Understanding the process

Read this if you are an organization that received federal funding subject to the Uniform Guidance. 

We are excited to announce the OMB released the 2021 Compliance Supplement late last week. This long-awaited release is effective for audits of fiscal years beginning after June 30, 2020 and supersedes the 2020 supplement and subsequent addendum. We are continuing to evaluate the changes to the supplement, but a few things to note from our early look:

  • There will be an addendum to this supplement, to address certain COVID-related relief funding with changing regulations that were not in place in time for this supplement. 
  • Good news for higher education: Part 4 of the supplement related to the Higher Education Emergency Relief Funds (within assistance listing 84.425, section 2) is not expected to be amended by the addendum.
  • The supplement is making the formal shift away from the “Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance” (or CFDA) language to the term “Assistance Listing” in describing the number used for each program.
  • To evaluate the changes in the supplement from the prior year, consider checking out the Matrix of Compliance Requirements in Part 2 and Appendix V.

The timing for the release of the anticipated addendum has not yet been confirmed, but your audit teams are excited to get started with the new supplement. If you have any questions or need help making sense of it all, contact our Single Audit team. We’re here to help.

Article
OMB 2021 compliance supplement released