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As we find ourselves in a fast-moving, strong business growth environment, there is no better time to consider the controls needed to enhance your IT security as you implement new, high-demand technology and software to allow your organization to thrive and grow. Here are five risks you need to take care of if you want to build or maintain strong IT security.

This is the second blog post in the blog series: “Procuring Agile vs. Non-Agile Service”. Read the first blog. This blog post demonstrates the differences in Stage 1: Plan Project in the five stages of procuring agile vs. non-agile services.

In my last blog, I defined the what and the why of data governance, and outlined the value of data governance in higher education environments. I also asserted data isn’t the problem―the real culprit is our handling of the data (or rather, our deferral of data responsibility to others).

What is the difference in how government organizations procure agile vs. non-agile information technology (IT) services?

Who has the time or resources to keep tabs on everything that everyone in an organization does? No one. Therefore, you naturally need to trust (at least on a certain level) the actions and motives of various personnel. At the top of your “trust level” are privileged users—such as system and network administrators and developers—who keep vital systems, applications, and hardware up and running.

Law enforcement, courts, prosecutors, and corrections personnel provide many complex, seemingly limitless services. Seemingly is the key word here, for in reality these personnel provide a set number of incredibly important services.

“The world is one big data problem,” says MIT scientist and visionary Andrew McAfee.

That’s a daunting (though hardly surprising) quote for many in data-rich sectors, including higher education. Yet blaming data is like blaming air for a malfunctioning wind turbine. Data is a valuable asset that can make your institution move.

As a new year is upon us, many people think about “out with the old and in with the new”. For those of us who think about technology, and in particular, blockchain technology, the new year brings with it the realization that blockchain is here to stay (at least in some form).

Cloud services are becoming more and more omnipresent, and rapidly changing how companies and organizations conduct their day-to-day business.

The late science fiction writer (and college professor) Isaac Asimov once said: “I do not fear computers. I fear the lack of them.” Had Asimov worked in higher ed IT management, he might have added: “but above all else, I fear the lack of computer staff.”

As a leader in a higher education institution, you'll be familiar with this paradox: Every solution can lead to more problems, and every answer can lead to more questions. It’s like navigating an endless maze. When it comes to mobile apps, the same holds true. 

Read this if you are a solar developer, installer or investor.

Much of the focus in the renewable energy space has been on the commercial Investment Tax Credit (ITC), due to the size of the projects and the money involved. Certainly the nuances of passive vs. active income and basis limitations drive a lot of the conversation about investing in a large scale project. But what about the residential credit? In some ways the residential credit is simpler, but many questions remain. Here we explain some of the differences and things unique to the residential credit to hopefully clear up some of your questions.

Where can the project be located?

Per the regulations for the residential ITC, the solar-energy producing equipment needs to be located on a “home” owned by the taxpayer. This is important because it does not say “primary residence”, but “home”. So the project could be on your primary residence, or it could be on your vacation home on Cape Cod. The important thing here is that the property is used as a “home”, or residence. If you are putting the solar project on a rental property then that would fall into the commercial ITC category, not the residential.

When can I claim the credit?

The credit is claimed on the tax return for the year the project is placed in service. Being placed in service is defined as being operational for its intended purpose—so in other words, not only does it need to be installed, it has to be turned on and operating. Some projects get stuck in the inspection queue at year end and don’t get approved until after the first of the next year. If that happens to you, unfortunately your credit will need to be claimed on the next tax return. Unlike the commercial ITC, there is no provision for a safe harbor for the credit. If you don’t reach full installation and operation by December 31, 2022 then you are only eligible for the 22% credit instead of the 26% credit you would have gotten if the project was completed in 2022. 

What costs qualify?

Only the costs for equipment that is integral to the production of energy qualify for the credit. This includes panels, racking, and inverters, but can also include some other costs, depending on the circumstances. It does not include improvements and enhancements to your roof that are not directly related to the production of energy. This tends to be a bigger issue on commercial projects where the added weight of the equipment and the slope of the roof require additional work to be done. However, a skylight added to your roof is not part of the solar energy equipment, and the cost of that addition should be excluded from your total cost, even though it may be helping to make your home more energy efficient. The cost of replacing a roof does not qualify, but in certain cases upgrades to the roof can be included.

What about depreciation?

Depreciation is the annual expensing of a commercial asset. Since the project is on your home, there is no depreciation expense to claim. Instead, the cost of the energy equipment installed on your house becomes part of your cost basis, or original purchase value, of your house. In the future if the house is sold, this cost will help reduce the amount of taxable gain on the sale.

What about storage?

Battery storage has been a part of renewable energy projects for years, but as the technology gets better and more cost effective it is becoming a bigger part of project offerings. Currently, a battery storage system is only eligible for the residential ITC if it is installed at the same time as the energy-producing equipment. This is the same for both the residential and commercial credit. In addition to being installed as part of the original project cost, the battery must also be charged by the renewable energy-producing equipment. If it draws a charge from the grid or from another non-renewable energy source, it will not qualify for the ITC.

We have been watching the activity in Washington, D.C. carefully since President Biden took office. One of the items in the proposed tax bill is an expansion of the Investment Tax Credit to allow for stand-alone energy storage equipment to qualify. While this is still in discussion and no legislation has passed yet, this change to the rules could potentially allow for battery storage to be added to existing projects, and the taxpayer taking the ITC on the cost of adding the battery storage equipment. 

Every project, home, and taxpayer’s situation is different, so it is important to discuss your individual project and tax situation with your tax advisor. As we have described here, the residential and commercial ITCs are similar, but not the same. However, both have the potential of being beneficial to the taxpayer, and perhaps at a greater level to environment.

Article
Residential Investment Tax Credits: Answers to some common questions 

Read this if you support State Medicaid Program Integrity efforts.

Recently, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released updated guidance on how states should handle their Third Party Liability (TPL) claims and ensuring that all insurances pay prior to the State Medicaid Agency (SMA) paying any claims. Before we get into the updated guidance, let’s discuss the basics of TPL and what your SMA needs to know.

TPL Basics

There are several different types of healthcare liabilities:

  • Health insurers – Coordination of benefits and primary payers; this can be through group insurances or employer/member paid insurance.
  • Government programs – Public health programs, such as the Breast & Cervical Cancer Screening or the Vaccines for Children Program.
  • Other people or entities – Automobile insurance, product liability, or medical malpractice. The main thing to remember is that Medicaid will not pay if someone else is responsible.
  • Awards through courts or casualty/tort claims – This would be if a payment is made in a settlement, Medicaid can claim off of that award for Medicaid covered services that do not exceed what has already been paid out.

Again, the main thing to remember is Medicaid is the payer of last resort! There are few exceptions to this rule, including:

  • Indian Health Services (IHS), where Medicaid pays first and IHS covers the remaining services covered for this population.
  • Members who have Veterans Assistance (VA) coverage. Medicaid is the second payer to VA benefits except for in nursing homes and emergency treatment cases outside of VA facilities.

Agencies have data use agreements that describe how the data will be collected, transmitted, and used. But where does the data come from? 

  • Caseworkers can collect information directly from the member at the time of enrollment or re-enrollment.
  • Eligibility system(s) and the TPL vendor can access both state and federal data exchanges, which can then be shared with the Medicaid Management Information System (MMIS).
  • Medical, dental, vision, and pharmacy claims are a great source of data because this information comes from the provider who collects it from the member.
  • Data exchanges are also an important part of data gathering:
    • State Wage Information Collection Agencies (SWICA) is a state database that shows if a member or family member is employed allowing the state to inquire about additional coverage through the employers insurance.
    • Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System (DEERS) is related to members of current or former military service who have TriCare insurance coverage.
    • State Verification and Eligibility Systems (SVES) and the State Data Exchange (SDX) work together to verify tax information, employment, eligibility, etc.
      • These systems work for more than just TPL through verifying enrollment but TPL is a component. 
      • This is also where the state can reduce duplicate enrollments—having a member with enrollments in Medicaid in several states and reaping the benefits in each state.
  • Motor vehicle administration and worker’s compensation systems can verify if the claim was the result of an automobile accident or occurred on the job. Once verified in the system, an edit can be included to deny so the TPL vendor knows to go back and review the claim.
  • Payers and health plans share the information with each other and with Medicaid. This allows all payer to use the same database.

TPL checkpoints

Throughout the process of developing a claim, there are many opportunities to check TPL coverage. The member is a great source of information since who else knows more about a person, besides themselves. The member enrollment caseworker and the enrollment application can also provide a lot of information that comes directly from the member. Through Medicaid and CHIP work with the Managed Care Organizations (MCO), it is in the MCO’s best interest to ask a member about TPL coverage during each and every encounter with the member. However, it is important to remember that if TPL is involved, Medicaid is the payer of last resort; but for CHIP, if TPL is involved, typically there is no CHIP coverage. 

The TPL vendor, enrollment broker, and providers are also excellent resources for obtaining member information. The TPL vendor conducts data mining within claims to find external causes of conditions that suggest another person or entity is responsible for payment. When a member calls the enrollment broker to choose their MCO, this is an opportunity to ask the member about any TPL coverage. Finally, the providers can share valuable information that was received from the member.

Claims adjudication process

Up to this point, we have discussed the primary payer information, the accident indicator, and a work related indicator, but there are still a couple more steps in the process to discuss. Your SMA’s should set the edits within your MMIS so that the state can process payments correctly up front to reduce overpayments and the expense of recouping that money. The edits within the MMIS should be regularly reviewed to ensure they are in compliance with state policies (including state plans) and federal guidelines.

Some other areas that should be reviewed to check for TPL coverage is the member age and diagnosis codes. If the member is 65 years of age or older, Medicare should be considered as a source of coverage. Also, diagnosis codes can be an indicator of an automobile accident or injury on the job. Following each of these steps, can prevent the state from overpaying a claim or making a payment in error.

Potential TPL indicators in information received on a claim can vary. For example, CMS and dental codes use the same field names, while the uniform billing (UB) form has defined codes to identify the primary liability. 

CMS-1500     UB-04     Dental
Other Insurance Condition Code Other Insurance
Accident Date Occurrence Code Accident Date
Work Related Injury Diagnosis Code Work Related Injury
Diagnosis Codes Diagnosis Code

Data relationships

The relationship between data sources varies across programs. Medicaid feeds into and/or receives information from all data sources, including CHIP, MCOs, TPL vendor, data warehouse, federal databases, and state databases (such as department of motor vehicles and worker’s compensation). CHIP interacts with Medicaid, MCOs, TPL vendor, and the data warehouse. The TPL vendor exchanges information with Medicaid, CHIP, MCOs, data warehouse, and state databases. The MCOs have a relationship with Medicaid, CHIP, TPL vendor, and the data warehouse. Working together, these programs have access to all of the different data sources; however, sometimes the relationship is indirect and takes multiple steps to complete the transaction. This is why the sharing of data is so important!

TPL data sharing

Working together is the best way to ensure all entities have access to the same and as much information as possible. There typically needs to be a contract relationship between your SMA and all entities that send or receive data. It is a good idea for the SMA to have a data use agreement with each agency that defines how the data will be collected, transmitted, and used. The data can be transmitted in any way, as long as it is secure, and can be stored in the data warehouse which allows all entities that will use the data to have access to the same information.

MCO contracting

The MCO contract between the SMA or the CHIP Agency and the MCO requires the MCOs to conduct TPL activity. In addition, your state should consider including a finder’s keepers clause in their contract with the MCO, which allows the state to collect on overpayments that the MCO chooses not to collect. For example: the MCO can decide that it will cost more to recoup the overpayment than the money recouped so the MCO can choose not to pursue in which case the state can pursue. The state would keep all the money collected.

The contract between your SMA and TPL vendor should include the state and federal data searches as required by regulation. This contract should also include sharing of data with the MCOs that reduces the risk of duplicate expenses for the SMA and the MCOs.

TPL policy

It is key for your SMA to align all policies to both state and federal regulations but the more the policies are aligned across programs within your state, the better.

Many TPL policy references can provide all information regarding the federal regulations.

  • Title 42, Chapter IV, Subchapter C, Part 433 – State Fiscal Administration, Subpart D – Third-Party Liability
  • Medicaid Bipartisan Budget Act (BBA) of 2018, Section 53102, Third Party Liability in Medicaid and CHIP
  • Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (DRA)
  • Coordination of Benefits and Third Party Liability (COB/TPL) in Medicaid 2020 Handbook
    • This comprehensive resource includes all of the references as well as guidance for your SMA.
  • Medicaid.gov TPL 
    • Good resource for updated information in addition to resources and guidance for states.

Now that we have covered the basics of TPL, let’s review some of the updated guidance recently released by CMS.

TPL policy changes

Medicaid BBA of 2018

  • CMS updated the pay and chase guidelines and removed some of the requirements.
    • SMAs are no longer required to pay and chase pregnancy claims. These can now be rejected up front.
  • CMS updated medical support enforcement claims payment to extend the timely filing period.
    • The timely filing period was 30 days but has now been extended up to 100 days.

DRA of 2005

  • The updated regulations clarified that third-parties include:

    • Health insurance
    • Medicare
    • Employer sponsored health insurance
    • Settlements from liability insurer
    • Workers compensation
    • Long-term care insurance
    • State and federal programs unless specifically excluded by statute
  • The updated regulations also specified that health insurers should provide the SMA with eligibility data, honor assignment of right to payment, and refrain from procedural denial of Medicaid claims.

COB/TPL in Medicaid 2020 Handbook

  • CMS updated the guidelines to include the pay and chase requirement for Medical Support Enforcement and Preventive Pediatric Services.

On August 27, 2021, CMS released guidance directing SMAs to ensure their state plans are updated and in compliance with federal guidelines by December 31, 2021. 

You can learn more about the updated guidance here

MCO claims

  • MCO encounter claims need to be in the state’s data warehouse to ensure:
    • TPL services are tracked in the data warehouse
    • TPL and MCO paid claims can be differentiated
    • All services are reported within the warehouse

Next steps

There are several things you can do to help ensure your SMA is getting the most out of your TPL data. You can review the following:

  • Medicaid, CHIP, and MCO TPL policies
  • TPL vendor business processes and policies
  • MCO contracts for TPL language
  • TPL vendor contract
  • Claim edits in the MMIS

If you have any questions, please contact our Medicaid consulting team. We're here to help.

Article
Third Party Liability claims: What state Medicaid agencies need to know

Read this if you paid wages for qualified sick and family leave in 2021.

The IRS has issued guidance to employers on year-end reporting for sick and family leave wages that were paid in 2021 to eligible employees under recent federal legislation.

IRS Notice 2021-53, issued on September 7, 2021, provides that employers must report “qualified leave wages” either on a 2021 Form W-2 or on a separate statement, including:

  • Qualified leave wages paid from January 1, 2021 through March 31, 2021 (Q1) under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA), as amended by the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (CAA).
  • Qualified leave wages paid from April 1, 2021 through September 30, 2021 (Q2 and Q3) under the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (ARPA).

The notice also explains how employees who are also self-employed should report such paid leave. This guidance builds on IRS Notice 2020-54, issued in July 2020, which explained the reporting requirements for 2020 qualified leave wages.

Employers should work with their IT department and/or payroll service provider as soon as possible to review the payroll system, earnings codes configuration and W-2 mapping to ensure that these paid leave wages are captured timely and accurately for year-end W-2 reporting.

FFCRA and ARPA tax credits background

In March 2020, the FFCRA imposed a federal mandate requiring eligible employers to provide paid sick and family leave from April 1, 2020 to December 31, 2020, up to specified limits, to employees unable to work due to certain COVID-related circumstances. The FFCRA provided fully refundable tax credits to cover the cost of the mandatory leave.

In December 2020, the CAA extended the FFCRA tax credits through March 31, 2021, for paid leave that would have met the FFCRA requirements (except that the leave was optional, not mandatory). The ARPA further extended the credits for paid leave through September 30, 2021, if the leave would have met the FFCRA requirements.

In addition to employer tax credits, under the CAA, a self-employed individual may claim refundable qualified sick and family leave equivalent credits if the individual was unable to work during Q1 due to certain COVID-related circumstances. The ARPA extended the availability of the credits for self-employed individuals through September 30, 2021. However, an eligible self-employed individual may have to reduce the qualified leave equivalent credits by some (or all) of the qualified leave wages the individual received as an employee from an employer.

Reporting requirements to claim the refundable tax credits

Eligible employers who claim the refundable tax credits under the FFCRA or ARPA must separately report qualified sick and family leave wages to their employees. Employers who forgo claiming such credits are not subject to the reporting requirements.

Qualified leave wages paid in 2021 under the FFCRA and ARPA must be reported in Box 1 of the employee’s 2021 Form W-2. Qualified leave wages that are Social Security wages or Medicare wages must be included in boxes 3 and 5, respectively. To the extent the qualified leave wages are compensation subject to the Railroad Retirement Tax Act (RRTA), they must also be included in box 14 under the appropriate RRTA reporting labels.

In addition, employers must report to the employee the following types and amounts of wages that were paid, with each amount separately reported either in box 14 of the 2021 Form W-2 or on a separate statement:

  • The total amount of qualified sick leave wages paid for reasons described in paragraphs (1), (2), or (3) of Section 5102(a) of the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSLA)1  with respect to leave provided to employees during the period beginning on January 1, 2021, through March 31, 2021. The following, or similar language, must be used to label this amount: “Sick leave wages subject to the $511 per day limit paid for leave taken after December 31, 2020, and before April 1, 2021.”
  • The total amount of qualified sick leave wages paid for reasons described in paragraphs (4), (5), or (6) of Section 5102(a) of the EPSLA with respect to leave provided to employees during the period beginning on January 1, 2021, through March 31, 2021. The following, or similar language, must be used to label this amount: “Sick leave wages subject to the $200 per day limit paid for leave taken after December 31, 2020, and before April 1, 2021.”
  • The total amount of qualified family leave wages paid to the employee under the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (EFMLEA) with respect to leave provided to employees during the period beginning on January 1, 2021, through March 31, 2021. The following, or similar language, must be used to label this amount: “Emergency family leave wages paid for leave taken after December 31, 2020, and before April 1, 2021.”
  • The total amount of qualified sick leave wages paid for reasons described in paragraphs (1), (2), or (3) of Section 5102(a) of the EPSLA with respect to leave provided to employees during the period beginning on April 1, 2021, through September 30, 2021. The following, or similar language, must be used to label this amount: “Sick leave wages subject to the $511 per day limit paid for leave taken after March 31, 2021, and before October 1, 2021.”
  • The total amount of qualified sick leave wages paid for reasons described in paragraphs (4), (5), and (6) of Section 5102(a) of the EPSLA with respect to leave provided to employees during the period beginning on April 1, 2021, through September 30, 2021. The following, or similar language, must be used to label this amount: “Sick leave wages subject to the $200 per day limit paid for leave taken after March 31, 2021, and before October 1, 2021.”
  • The total amount of qualified family leave wages paid to the employee under the EFMLEA with respect to leave provided to employees during the period beginning on April 1, 2021, through September 30, 2021. The following, or similar language, must be used to label this amount: Emergency family leave wages paid for leave taken after March 31, 2021, and before October 1, 2021.”

If an employer chooses to provide a separate statement and the employee receives a paper 2021 Form W-2, then the statement must be included with the Form W-2 sent to the employee. If the employee receives an electronic 2021 Form W-2, then the statement must be provided in the same manner and at the same time as the Form W-2.

In addition to the above required information, the notice also suggests that employers provide additional information about qualified sick and family leave wages that explains that these wages may limit the amount of the qualified sick leave equivalent or qualified family leave equivalent credits to which the employee may be entitled with respect to any self-employment income.

For more information

If you have more questions, or have a specific question about your particular situation, please call us. We’re here to help.

 1Employees are eligible for qualified sick leave under EPSLA if the employee:

  • Was subject to a federal, state or local quarantine or isolation order related to COVID-19;
  • Had been advised by a health-care provider to self-quarantine due to concerns related to COVID-19;
  • Experienced symptoms of COVID-19 and was seeking a medical diagnosis;
  • Was caring for an individual who was subject to a quarantine order related to COVID-19, or had been advised by a health-care provider to self-quarantine due to concerns related to COVID-19;
  • Was caring for a son or daughter of such employee, if the school or place of care of the son or daughter had been closed, or the child-care provider of such son or daughter was unavailable, due to COVID-19; or
  • Was experiencing any other substantially similar condition specified by the Secretary of Health and Human Services.

Article
IRS guidance to employers: Year-end reporting requirements for qualified sick and family leave wages

Read this if you use QuickBooks online.

There are always more things to learn about the applications we use every day. Here are some tips for expanding your use of QuickBooks Online. 

We tend to fall into the same old patterns once we’ve learned how to make a computer application work for us. We learn the features we need and rarely venture beyond those unless we find we need the software or website to do more. 

QuickBooks Online is no exception. It makes its capabilities known through an understandable system of menus and icons, labeled columns and fields, and links. But do we really see what else it can do? Expanding your knowledge about what QuickBooks Online can do may help you shave some time off your accounting tasks and better manage the forms, transactions, and reports that you work with every day. Here are some tips.

Edit lines in transactions. Have you ever been almost done with a transaction and realize you need to make some changes farther up in the list of line items? Don’t delete the transaction and start over. QuickBooks Online comes with simple editing tools, including:

  • Delete a line. Click the trash can icon to the right of the line. 
  • Reorder lines. Click the icon to the left of the line, hold it, and guide it to the new position. This is tricky. You may have to work with it a bit.
  • Clear all lines and Add lines. Click the buttons below your line items, to the left.


Click the More link at the bottom of a saved transaction to see what your options are.

Explore the More menu. Saved transactions in QuickBooks Online have a link at the bottom of the screen labeled More, as pictured above. Click it, and you can Copy the transaction or Void or Delete it. You can also view the Transaction journal, which displays the behind-the-scenes accounting work, and see an Audit history, which lists any actions taken on the transaction. 

Create new tabs. Do you ever wish you could display more than one screen simultaneously so you can flip back and forth between them? You can. Right click on any link in QuickBooks Online, like Sales | Customers, and select Open link in new tab

Use keyboard shortcuts. Not everyone is a fan of these, mostly because they can’t remember them. Hold down these three keys together to see a list: Ctrl+Alt+?. Some common ones include those for invoices (Ctrl+Alt+i) and for expenses (Ctrl+Alt+x).

Modify your sales forms. Do you need more flexibility than what’s offered in your sales forms? It may be there. Click the gear icon in the upper right and select Account and settings under Your Company. Click the Sales tab. In the section labeled Sales form content, notice that you can add fields for Shipping, Discounts, and Deposits by clicking on their on/off switches. You can also add Custom fields and Custom transaction numbers.

Add attachments. Sometimes it’s helpful to have a copy of a source document when you enter a transaction. To attach a receipt to an expense, for example, look in the lower left corner of the transaction. Click Attachments and browse your system folders to find the file, then double click on it.


Record expenses made with credit cards. Who doesn’t use credit cards for expenses sometimes? You can track these purchases in QuickBooks Online, as pictured above. Click the gear icon in the upper right and select Chart of Accounts under Your Company, then click New in the upper right. Select Credit Card from the drop-down list under Account Type. Enter Owner Purchase in the Name field and then Save and Close. When you create an expense, select Owner Purchase as the Payment account

Previous Transaction Button. Are you trying to find a transaction that you entered recently but don’t want to do a full-on search? With a transaction of the same type open, click the clock icon in the top left corner. A list of Recent Expenses will drop down. Click on the one you want.

Whether you’re new to QuickBooks Online or you’ve been using it for years, there’s always more to explore. We’d be happy to help you expand your use of QuickBooks Online by introducing you to new features, building on what you’re already doing on the site to improve your overall financial management. Contact our Outsourced Accounting team to schedule some time.

Article
Eight QuickBooks online tips

Read this if you are a community bank.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) recently issued its second quarter 2021 Quarterly Banking Profile. The report provides financial information based on Call Reports filed by 4,951 FDIC-insured commercial banks and savings institutions. The report also contains a section specific to community bank performance. In second quarter 2021, this section included the financial information of 4,490 FDIC-insured community banks. BerryDunn’s key takeaways from the community bank section of the report are as follows:

  • There was a $1.9 billion increase in quarterly net income from a year prior despite continued net interest margin (NIM) compression. This increase was mainly due to higher net interest income and lower provision expenses. Net interest income had increased $1.4 billion due to 1) lower interest expense, 2) higher commercial and industrial (C&I) loan interest income, and 3) loan fees earned through the payoff and forgiveness of Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans. Provision expense decreased $2.3 billion from second quarter 2020. However, it remained positive at $46.1 million. For non-community banks, provision expense was negative $10.8 billion for second quarter 2021.
  • Quarterly NIM declined 26 basis points from second quarter 2020 to 3.25%. The average yield on earning assets fell 57 basis points to 3.57% while the average funding cost fell 31 basis points to 0.32%. Both of which are record lows.
  • Net operating revenue (net interest income plus non-interest income) increased by $1.6 billion from second quarter 2020, a 6.5% increase. This increase is attributable to higher revenue from service charges on deposit accounts (increased $134.8 million, or 23.5%, during the year ending second quarter 2021) and an increase in “all other noninterest income,” including, but not limited to, bankcard and credit card interchange fees, income and fees from wire transfers, and income and fees from automated teller machines (up $203.6 million, or 9.3%, during the year ending second quarter 2021).
  • Non-interest expense increased 7.8% from second quarter 2020. This increase was mainly attributable to salary and benefit expenses, which saw an increase of $688.2 million (7.8%). That being said, average assets per employee increased 8.4% from second quarter 2020. Non-interest expense as a percentage of average assets declined 18 basis points from second quarter 2020.
  • Noncurrent loan balances (loans 90 days or more past due or in nonaccrual status) declined by $894.6 million, or 7.1%, from first quarter 2021. The noncurrent rate improved 5 basis points to 0.68% from first quarter 2021.
  • The coverage ratio (allowance for loan and lease losses as a percentage of loans that are 90 days or more past due or in nonaccrual status) increased 39.8 percentage points year-over-year to 191.7%, a record high, due to declines in noncurrent loans. This ratio is well above the financial crisis average of 64.5%. The coverage ratio for community banks is 15.4 percentage points above the coverage ratio for non-community banks.
  • Eighty-eight community banks had adopted current expected credit loss (CECL) accounting as of second quarter. Community bank CECL adopters reported negative provision expense of $208.3 million in the second quarter compared to positive $254.5 million for community banks that have not yet adopted CECL.
  • Net charge-offs declined 8 basis points from second quarter 2020 to 0.05%. The net charge-off rate for consumer loans declined most among major loan categories, having decreased 51 basis points.
  • Trends in loans and leases showed a slight decrease from first quarter 2021, decreasing by 0.5%. This decrease was mainly seen in the C&I loan category, which was driven by a $38.3 billion decrease in PPP loan balances. The decrease in PPP loans was driven by the payoff and forgiveness of such loans. Despite the decrease in loans quarter-over-quarter, total loans and leases increased by $5.7 billion (0.3%) from second quarter 2020. The majority of growth was seen in commercial real estate portfolios (up $61.7 billion, or 8.9%), which helped to offset the decline in C&I, agricultural production, and 1-4 family mortgage loans during the year.
  • Two-thirds of community banks reported an increase in deposit volume during the second quarter. Growth in deposits above the insurance limit, $250,000, increased by $47.8 billion, or 4.7%, while alternative funding sources, such as brokered deposits, declined by $3.8 billion, or 6.7%, from first quarter 2021. 
  • The average community bank leverage ratio (CBLR) for the 1,789 banks that elected to use the CBLR framework was 11%.
  • The number of community banks declined by 38 to 4,490 from first quarter 2021. This change includes two new community banks, 12 banks transitioning from community to non-community banks, one bank transitioning from non-community to community bank, 27 community bank mergers or consolidations, and two community bank self-liquidations.

Second quarter 2021 was another strong quarter for community banks, as evidenced by the increase in year-over-year quarterly net income of 28.7% ($1.9 billion). However, tightening NIMs will force community banks to find creative ways to increase their NIM, grow their earning asset bases, or find ways to continue to increase non-interest income to maintain current net income levels. Some community banks have already started dedicating more time to non-traditional income streams, as evidenced by a 4.3% year-over-year increase in quarterly non-interest income. The importance of the efficiency ratio (non-interest expense as a percentage of total revenue) is also magnified as community banks attempt to manage their non-interest expenses in light of declining NIMs. Banks appear to be strongly focusing on non-interest expense management, as seen by the 18 basis point decline from second quarter 2020 in non-interest expense as a percentage of average assets, although inflated balance sheets may have something to do with the decrease in the percentage.

Furthermore, much uncertainty still exists. For instance, although significant charge-offs have not yet materialized, the financial picture for many borrowers remains uncertain. And, payment deferrals have made some credit quality indicators, such as past due status, less reliable. Payment deferrals for many borrowers are coming to a halt. So, the true financial picture of these borrowers may start to come into focus. The ability of community banks to maintain relationships with their borrowers and remain apprised of the results of their borrowers’ operations has never been more important. This monitoring will become increasingly important as we transition into a post-pandemic economy. For seasonal borrowers, current indications, such as the most recent results from the Federal Reserve’s Beige Book, show that economic activity was relatively strong over the summer of 2021. However, supply chain pressures and labor shortages could put a damper on the uptick in economic activity for these borrowers, making a successful transition into the “off-season” months that much more important. 

Also, as offices start to open, employers will start to reassess their office needs. Many employers have either created or revised remote working policies due to changing employee behavior. If remote working schedules persist, whether it be full-time or hybrid, the demand for office space may decline, causing instability for commercial real estate borrowers. Recent inflation concerns have also created uncertainty surrounding future Federal Reserve monetary policy. If an increase in the federal funds target rate is used to combat inflation, community banks could see their NIMs in another transitory stage.

As always, please don’t hesitate to reach out to BerryDunn’s Financial Services team if you have any questions.

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FDIC Issues its Second Quarter 2021 Quarterly Banking Profile