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Provider relief funds: Allowable uses 

12.11.20

Read this if your facility or organization has received provider relief funds.

The rules over the use of the provider relief funds (PRF) have been in a constant state of flux since the funds started to show up in your bank accounts back in April. Here is a summary of where we are as of November 30, 2020 with allowable uses of the funds.
 
The most recent Post-Payment Notice of Reporting Requirements is dated November 2, 2020. In accordance with the notice, PRF may be used for two purposes:

  1. Healthcare-related expenses attributable to coronavirus that another source has not reimbursed and is not obligated to reimburse
  2. Lost revenue, up to the amount of the difference between 2019 and 2020 actual patient care revenue

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has issued FAQs as recently as November 18, 2020.  The FAQs include the following clarifications on the allowable uses:

Healthcare related expenses attributable to the coronavirus

  1. PRF may be used for the marginal increased expenses or incremental expenses related to coronavirus.
  2. Expenses cannot be reimbursed by another source or another source cannot be obligated to reimburse the expense.
  3. Other sources include, but are not limited to, direct patient billing, commercial insurance, Medicare/Medicaid/Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), or other funds received from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Provider Relief Fund COVID-19 Claims Reimbursement to Health Care Providers and Facilities for Testing, Treatment, and Vaccine Administration for the Uninsured, and the Small Business Administration (SBA) and Department of Treasury’s Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). This would also include any state and federal grants received as a result of the coronavirus.
  4. Providers should apply reasonable assumptions when estimating the portion of costs that are reimbursed from other sources.
  5. The examples in the FAQs for increased cost of an office visit and patient billing seem to point to only supplemental coronavirus related reimbursement needing to be offset against the increased expense.
  6. PRF may be used for the full cost of equipment or facility projects if the purchase was directly related to preventing, preparing for and responding to the coronavirus; however, if you claim the full cost, you cannot also claim the depreciation for any items capitalized.
  7. PRF cannot be used to pay salaries at a rate in excess of Executive Level II which is currently set at $197,300.

Lost revenues attributable to the coronavirus

  1. Lost revenues attributable to coronavirus are calculated based upon a calendar year comparison of 2019 to 2020 actual revenue/net charges from patient care (prior to netting with expenses).
  2. Any unexpended PRF at 12/31/20 is then eligible for use through June 30, 2021 and calculated lost revenues in 2021 are compared to January to June 2019.
  3. Reported patient care revenue is net of uncollectible patient service revenue recognized as bad debts and includes 340B contract pharmacy revenue.
  4. This comparison is cumulative, for example, if your net income improves in Q4, it will reduce lost revenues from Q2.
  5. Retroactive cost report settlements or other payments received that are not related to care provided in 2019 or 2020 can be excluded from the calculation.

Whether you are tracking expenses or lost revenues, the accounting treatment for both is to be consistent with your normal basis of accounting (cash or accrual).
 
As a reminder, the first reporting period (through December 31, 2020) is due February 15, 2021. The reporting portal is supposed to open January 15, 2021. Any unexpended PRF at December 31, 2020 can be used from January 1, 2021 through June 30, 2021, with final reporting due July 31, 2021.

The guidance continues to change rapidly and new FAQs are issued each week. Please check back here for any updates, or contact Mary Dowes for more information.

Related Professionals

Read this if you are an administrator, manager, or director at a Rural Health Clinic (RHC) or Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC).

The following outlines key due dates related to various CARES Act funding streams that you may have received. Updated as of April 27, 2020.

1. Round two of the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) was just signed last week. If you have not applied and plan to do so, please do so ASAP as the funds are likely to be exhausted quickly.
2. Your 12-month budget for the CARES Act funding is due on May 8, 2020. As you prepare your budget, please consider the following:
a. If you were lucky enough to get approved for PPP loans, use these funds first to pay for salaries and wages as they are for eight weeks only.
b. We encourage including federal grant expenses in all budget categories to enable you to take advantage of the flexibility HRSA has provided you by allowing reclassifications between budget categories up to the lesser of 25% of the federal award or $250,000 without asking for prior approval. If you wish to reclassify amounts to a budget category which didn’t previously have federal funds budgeted, you will have to submit a budget revision to HRSA for approval. This guidance applies to your base 330 grant as well. 
c. Remember, if an employee is paid more than $197,300 (Executive II salary level as of January 1, 2020), you can only charge $197,300 to any HRSA grant. This salary limitation does not apply to consultants or contracted employees.
d. Use of these funds is very likely to undergo audits, similar to the ARRA funding a number of years ago, therefore make sure you properly track how you use these funds (audit trail).
e. Have your personnel policies been modified for consistency with any new practices you’ve implemented as a result of the public health emergency (for example, hazard pay, family and sick leave and remote working)?

Click here for a list of HRSA’s examples of the allowable uses of the CARES Act funding.    
 
3. The initial distribution you received on April 20, 2020 from the CARES Act Provider Relief Fund has an attestation due on May 10, 2020. There are various provisions governing the use of the funds and we suggest you consider the ability to use these funds to offset lost earnings so you do not have to complete with the other funding programs you have received.

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CARES Act funding deadlines: Update for FQHCs and RHCs

Read this if you are an administrator, manager, or director at a Rural Health Clinic (RHC) or Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC).

CMS just released an article outlining new and expanded flexibilities for RHCs and FQHCs during the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE). The article includes the following information:

  • Payment rate for telehealth services
  • How to bill for telehealth services
  • Expanded virtual communications services

Payment for telehealth health services during the PHE (from January 27, 2020 through the end of the PHE) is $92. Billing for telehealth is segmented into two periods:

  1. January 27, 2020 – June 30, 2020, bill using the 95 modifier
  2. July 1, 2020 – end of PHE, bill using code G2025

The article further outlines that for telehealth services billed through June 30, they will be paid at the PPS rate. The claims will then be automatically reprocessed in July and a recoupment will occur for the difference between the $92 and your PPS rate. 

It will be important for you to keep track of the telehealth visits paid at your PPS rate and what the recoupment by Medicare will be so that when it occurs you will not be caught unawares.

Virtual communication services have been expanded to include digital evaluation and management services. Online digital evaluation and management services are non-face-to-face, patient initiated, digital communications using a secure patient portal. 

Additionally, the payment rate for these services will be $24.76 beginning March 1, 2020 through the end of the PHE instead of the CY 2020 rate of $13.53, and should bill using code G0071. 

Consider how the medical records component of your system interfaces with the billing component to ensure you capture these services for billing.

The full article can be accessed here: MLN Matters Special Edition Article 20016.
 

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CMS expands flexibility for RHCs and FQHCs

Read this if you are a director, manager, or administrator at a Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) or Rural Health Clinic (RHC).

The latest COVID-19 bill, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act included enhancing Medicare telehealth services for FQHCs and RHCs. This legislation waives the Section 1834(m) restriction on FQHCs and RHCs that prohibits them from serving as distant sites. This means during the COVID-19 State of Emergency, FQHCs and RHCs will be able to serve as distant sites to provide telehealth services to patients in their homes and other eligible locations. The legislation will reimburse FQHCs and RHCs at a rate that is similar to payment for comparable telehealth services under the physician fee schedule (Medicare Part B). FQHCs and RHCs will not be paid the Medicare PPS rate for these services.

Currently, Medicare, unlike many Medicaid programs and commercial payers, still requires the video component for telehealth. Effective immediately, the Office for Civil Rights at the Department of Health and Human Services will exercise its enforcement discretion and will not impose penalties for noncompliance with the regulatory requirements under the HIPAA Rules against covered health care providers in connection with the good faith provision of telehealth during the COVID-19 State of Emergency. Providers who want to use audio or video communication technology to provide telehealth during the COVID-19 State of Emergency can use any non-public facing remote communication product that is available to communicate with patients. Examples of acceptable platforms (non-public facing) include Apple FaceTime, Google G Suite Hangouts Meet, and Skype for Business.

We would also like to remind you of the ability to bill for virtual communication services. Virtual communication services are a brief, non-face-to-face check-in with a patient via communication technology, to assess whether the patient's condition necessitates an office visit. The call must be initiated by the patient and to be billable, the call must be between the patient and a physician, nurse practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse midwife, clinical psychologist, or clinical social worker. If the discussion is conducted by a nurse, health educator, or other clinical personnel, it is not billable as a virtual communication service. There is no video component required for virtual communication services. The check-in cannot relate to a visit with the patient during the previous seven days or result in a visit with the patient within the next 24 hours (or next available appointment). Read the FAQs from Medicare on the virtual communication services.

We continue to be here to support you. If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to reach out to any of us. 

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The CARES Act and telehealth services for FQHCs

The Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2020, which provides $8.3 billion in emergency funding for federal agencies to respond to the COVID-19 outbreak, has earmarked $100 million for FQHCs to prevent, prepare for, and respond to the COVID-19 national emergency. Pre-award costs will be supported by this funding and may date back to January 20, 2020. We recommend tracking your expenditures related to the coronavirus to the best of your ability. This may be helpful or necessary in providing your organization much needed financial relief.  

As a reminder, FQHCs cannot bill Medicare for telehealth services under the PPS rate. Telehealth can be billed to Medicare under Part B with the FQHC as an originating site and reimbursement is approximately $26. If you do not have home visits on Form 5, be sure to add home visits to 5C as soon as possible.

Amidst rapid hourly changes in contending with the coronavirus and its far-reaching impacts, we are sharing some HRSA and CMS guidance that may be helpful to you: 

Here is a link to HRSA FAQs related to COVID-19

Although we are working remotely, we are available to support you. If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to reach out to any of us.

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COVID-19 emergency funding for FQHCs: What you need to know

Read this if you are at a rural health clinic or are considering developing one.

Section 130 of H.R. 133, the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 (Covid Relief Package) has become law. The law includes the most comprehensive reforms of the Medicare RHC payment methodology since the mid-1990s. Aimed at providing a payment increase to capped RHCs (freestanding and provider-based RHCs attached to hospitals greater than 50 beds), the provisions will simultaneously narrow the payment gap between capped and non-capped RHCs.

This will not obtain full “site neutrality” in payment, a goal of CMS and the Trump administration, but the new provisions will help maintain budget neutrality with savings derived from previously uncapped RHCs funding the increase to capped providers and other Medicare payment mechanisms.

Highlights of the Section 130 provision:

  • The limit paid to freestanding RHCs and those attached to hospitals greater than 50 beds will increase to $100 beginning April 1, 2021 and escalate to $190 by 2028.
  • Any RHC, both freestanding and provider-based, will be deemed “new” if certified after 12/31/19 and subject to the new per-visit cap.
  • Grandfathering would be in place for uncapped provider-based RHCs in existence as of 12/31/19. These providers would receive their current All-Inclusive Rate (AIR) adjusted annually for MEI (Medicare Economic Index) or their actual costs for the year.

If you have any questions about your specific situation, please contact us. We’re here to help.

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Section 130 Rural Health Clinic (RHC) modernization: Highlights

Read this if your organization, business, or institution is receiving financial assistance as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

For companies and organizations that received federal funding to assist them during the COVID-19 pandemic, there have been some updates on Uniform Guidance. Here is a brief summary of those updates, audit threshold, federal funds subject to that threshold, and other pertinent information regarding the guidance.

Audit threshold

Non-federal entities that expend federal funds of $750,000 or more are required to have an audit in accordance with Subpart F of Title 2, U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards (Uniform Guidance).

Funds subject to threshold

  • 93.498 Provider Relief Fund
  • 21.019 Coronavirus Relief Fund
  • 84.425 Higher Education Stabilization Fund
  • 32.006 COVID-19 Telehealth Program
  • 84.184C CARES Act Project SERV
  • 93.461 COVID-19 Testing for the Uninsured
  • 93.527 Grants for New and Expanded Services under Health Center Program
  • 93.665 Emergency Grants to Address Mental and Substance Use Disorders During COVID-19
  • 93.967 COVID-19 Testing for Rural Health Clinics

Funds exempt from threshold

  • 59.073 (Small Business Administration) Payroll Protection Loan Program
  • 59.072 Economic Injury Disaster Loan Emergency Advance

Audit options

  • Single Audit in accordance with Uniform Guidance
  • Program-specific audit (only applicable if the non-federal entity expends Federal awards under one single CFDA)

Reporting timetables

  • Automatic three-month audit submission extension for Single Audits of 2020 year-ends through September 30, 2020 (only if recipient received some form of COVID-19 funding subject to Uniform Guidance)
    • Example, a June 30, 2020 year-end’s initial date is March 31, 2021, however this was extended to June 30, 2021

Compliance supplement addendum takeaways

  • Released December 22, 2020
  • Provides guidance on auditing above CFDAs
  • For organizations with year-ends prior to December 31, 2020, above funding will be reported in the Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards (SEFA) for fiscal years ending in 2021

For-profit considerations

  • Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has determined for-profit commercial organizations (which envelopes hospitals, senior living facilities, and other health facilities) are required to includes PRF payments in determining the $750,000 threshold
  • Currently, HHS guidance makes reference to organizations “receiving” not “expending” PRF, which is not in line with current Uniform Guidance definitions – AICPA has reached out for clarification
  • There is a third option under HHS guidance for organizations to have a financial audit performed in accordance with U.S. generally accepted auditing standards and U.S. generally accepted governmental auditing standards. However, there is uncertainty as to the specifics of this option and if this option would receive reporting extensions discussed above – AICPA has reached out for clarification

If you have questions about accounting for, or reporting on, funds that you have received as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, please contact a member of our Single Audit Team. We’re here to help.

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Uniform Guidance—where we are today

The COVID-19 emergency has caused CMS (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services) to expand eligibility for expedited payments to Medicare providers and suppliers for the duration of the public health emergency.

Accelerated payments have been available to providers/suppliers in the past due to a disruption in claims submission or claims processing, mainly due to natural disasters. Because of the COVID-19 public health emergency, CMS has expanded the accelerated payment program to provide necessary funds to eligible providers/suppliers who submit a request to their Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC) and meet the required qualifications.

Eligibility requirements―Providers/suppliers who:

  1. Have billed Medicare for claims within 180 days immediately prior to the date of signature on the provider’s/supplier’s request form,
  2. Are not in bankruptcy,
  3. Are not under active medical review or program integrity investigation, and
  4. Do not have any outstanding delinquent Medicare overpayments.

Amount of payment:
Eligible providers/suppliers will request a specific amount for an accelerated payment. Most providers can request up to 100% of the Medicare payment amount for a three-month period. Inpatient acute care hospitals and certain other hospitals can request up to 100% of the Medicare payment amount for a six-month period. Critical access hospitals (CAHs) can request up to 125% of the Medicare payment for a six-month period.

Processing time:
CMS has indicated that MACs will work to review and issue payment within seven calendar days of receiving the request.

Repayment, recoupment, and reconciliation:
The December 2020 Bipartisan-Bicameral Omnibus COVID Relief Deal revised the repayment, recoupment and reconciliation timeline on the Medicare Advanced and Accelerated Payment Program as identified below. 

Hospitals repayment, recoupment and reconciliation timeline 
Original Timeline 
Time from date of payment receipt  Recoupment & Repayment
120 days  No payments due 
121 - 365 days  Medicare claims reduced by 100% 
> 365 days provider may repay any balance due or be subject to an ~9.5% interest rate      Recoupment period ends - repayment of outstanding balance due 

Hospitals repayment, recoupment and reconciliation timeline 
Updated Timeline
Time from date of payment receipt  Recoupment & Repayment
1 year  No payments due 
11 months  Medicare claims reduced by 25% 
6 months  Medicare claims reduced by 50% 
> 29 months provider may repay any balance due or be subject to an 4% interest rate  Recoupment period ends - repayment of outstanding balance due 

Non-hospitals repayment, recoupment and reconciliation timeline
Original Timeline 
Time from date of payment receipt  Recoupment & Repayment
120 days  No payments due 
121 - 210 days Medicare claims reduced by 100% 
> 210 days provider may repay any balance due or be subject to an ~9.5% interest rate Recoupment period ends - repayment of outstanding balance due 

Non-hospitals repayment, recoupment and reconciliation timeline
Updated Timeline 
Time from date of payment receipt  Recoupment & Repayment
1 year No payments due 
11 months  Medicare claims reduced by 25% 
6 months Medicare claims reduced by 50% 
> 29 months provider may repay any balance due or be subject to an 4% interest rate  Recoupment period ends - outstanding balance due 

Application:
The MAC for Jurisdiction 6 and Jurisdiction K is NGS (National Government Services). The NGS application for accelerated payment can be found here.

The NGS Hotline telephone number is 1.888.802.3898. Per NGSMedicare.com, representatives are available Monday through Friday during regular business hours.

The MAC will review the application to ensure the eligibility requirements are met. The provider/supplier will be notified of approval or denial by mail or email. If the request is approved, the MAC will issue the accelerated payment within seven calendar days from the request.

Tips for filing the Request for Accelerated/Advance Payment:
The key to determining whether a provider should apply under Part A or Part B is the Medicare Identification number. For hospitals, the majority of funding would originate under Part A based on the CMS Certification Number (CCN) also known as the Provider Transaction Access Number (PTAN). As an example, Maine hospitals have CCN / PTAN numbers that use the following numbering convention "20-XXXX". Part B requests would originate when the provider differs from this convention. In short, everything reported on a cost report or Provider Statistical and Reimbursement report  (PS&R) would fall under Part A for the purpose of this funding. 
 
When funding is approved, the requested amount is compared to a database with amounts calculated by Medicare and provides funding at the lessor of the two amounts. The current form allows the provider to request the maximum payment amount as calculated by CMS or a lesser specified amount.
 
A representative from National Government Services indicated the preference was to receive one request for Part A per hospital. The form provides for attachment of a listing of multiple PTAN and NPI numbers that fall under the organization.

Interest after recoupment period:
On Monday, April 6, 2020, the American Hospital Association (AHA) wrote a letter to the Department of Health and Human Services and CMS requesting the interest rate applied to the repayment of the accelerated/advanced payments be waived or substantially reduced. AHA received clarification from CMS that any remaining balance at the end of the recoupment period is subject to interest. Currently that interest rate is set at 10.25% or the “prevailing rate set by the Treasury Department”. Without relief from CMS, interest will accrue as of the 31st day after the hospital has received a demand letter for the repayment of the remaining balance. The hospital does have 30 days to pay the balance without incurring interest.  

We are here to help
If you have questions or need more information about your specific situation, please contact the hospital consulting team. We’re here to help.

Article
Medicare Accelerated Payment Program

Read this if you are a business owner or interested in upcoming changes to current tax law.

As Joe Biden prepares to be inaugurated as the 46th President of the United States, and Congress is now controlled by Democrats, his tax policy takes center stage.

Although the Democrats hold the presidency and both houses of Congress for the next two years, any changes in tax law may still have to be passed through budget reconciliation, because 60 votes in the Senate generally are needed to avoid that process. Both in 2017 and 2001, passing tax legislation through reconciliation meant that most of the changes were not permanent; that is, they expired within the 10-year budget window. Here is a comparison of current tax law with Biden’s proposed tax plan.

Current Tax Law
(TCJA–present)
Biden’s stated goals
Corporate tax rates and AMT

Corporations have a flat 21% tax rate and no corporate alternative minimum tax (AMT), which were both changed by the TCJA.

These do not expire.

Biden would raise the flat rate to the pre-TCJA level of 28% and reinstate the corporate AMT, requiring corporations to pay the greater of their regular corporate income tax or the 15% minimum tax (while still allowing for net operating loss (NOL) and foreign tax credits).

Capital gains and Qualified Dividend Income

The top tax rate is 20% for income over $441,450 for individuals and $496,600 for married filing jointly. There is an additional 3.8% net investment income tax.

Biden would eliminate breaks for long-term capital gains and dividends for income above $1 million. Instead, these would be taxed at ordinary rates.

Payroll taxes

The 12.4% payroll tax is divided evenly between employers and employees and applies to the first $137,700 of an individual’s income (scheduled to go up to $142,400 in 2020). There is also a 2.9% Medicare Tax which is split equally between the employer and the employee with no income limit.

Biden would maintain the 12.4% tax split between employers and employees and keep the $142,400 cap but would institute the tax on earned income above $400,000. The gap between the two wage levels would gradually close with annual inflationary increases.

International taxes (GILTI, offshoring)

GILTI (Global Intangible Low-Tax Income): Established by the TCJA, U.S. multinationals are required to pay a foreign tax rate of between 10.5% and 13.125%.

A scheduled increase in the effective rate to 16.406% is scheduled to begin in 2026.

Offshoring taxes: The TCJA includes a tax deduction for corporations that manufacture in the U.S. and sell overseas.

GILTI: Biden would double the tax rate to 21% and assess a minimum tax on a country-by-country basis.

Offshoring taxes: Biden would establish a 10% penalty surtax on profits for goods and services manufactured offshore and a 10% advanceable “Made in America” tax credit to create U.S. manufacturing jobs. Biden would also close offshoring tax loopholes in the TCJA.

Estate taxes

The estate tax exemption for 2020 is $11,580,000. Transfers of appreciated property at death get a step-up in basis.

The exemption is scheduled to revert to pre-TCJA levels.

Biden would return the estate tax to 2009 levels, eliminate the current step-up in basis on inherited assets, and eliminate the step-up at death provision for inherited property passed along by the decedent.

Individual tax rates

The top marginal rate is 37% for income over $518,400 for individuals and $622,050 for married filing jointly. This was lowered from 39.6% pre-TCJA.

Biden would restore the 39.6% rate for taxable income above $400,000. This represents only the top rate.

Individual tax credits

Currently, individuals can claim a maximum of $2,000 Child Tax Credit (CTC) plus a $500 dependent credit.

Individuals may claim a maximum dependent care credit of $600 ($1,200 for two or more children).

The CTC is scheduled to revert to pre-TCJA levels ($1,000) after 2025.

Biden would expand the CTC to $3,000 for children age 17 and under and offer a $600 bonus for children age 6 and under. It would also be fully refundable.

He has also proposed increasing the child and dependent care tax credit to $8,000 ($16,000 for two or more children), and he has proposed a new tax credit of up to $5,000 for informal caregivers.

Separately, Biden has also proposed a $15,000 tax credit for first-time homebuyers.

Qualified Business Income Deduction under Section 199A

As previously discussed, many businesses qualify for a 20% qualified business income tax deduction lowering the effective rate of tax for S corporation shareholders and partners in partnerships to 29.6% for qualifying businesses.

Biden would phase out the tax benefits associated with the qualified business income deduction for those making more than $400,000 annually.

Education

Forgiven student loan debt is included in taxable income.

There is no tax credit for contributions to state-authorized organizations that sponsor scholarships.

Biden would exclude forgiven student loan debt from taxable income.

Small businesses

There are current tax credits for some of the costs to start a retirement plan.

Biden would offer tax credits for businesses that adopt a retirement savings plan and offer most workers without a pension or 401(k) access to an “automatic 401(k)”.

Itemized deductions

For 2020, the standard deduction is $12,400 for single/married filing separately and $24,800 for married filing jointly.

After 2025, the standard deduction is scheduled to revert to pre-TCJA amounts, or $6,350 for single /married filing separately and $12,700 for married filing jointly.

The TCJA suspended the personal exemption and most individual deductions through 2025.

It also capped the SALT deduction at $10,000, which will remain in place until 2025, unless repealed.

Biden would enact a provision that would cap the tax benefit of itemized deductions at 28%.

SALT cap: Senate minority leader Charles Schumer has pledged to repeal the cap should Biden win in November (the House of Representatives has already passed legislation to repeal the SALT cap).

Opportunity Zones

Biden has proposed incentivizing - opportunity zone funds to partner with community organizations and have the Treasury Department review the program’s regulations of the tax incentives. He would also increase reporting and public disclosure requirements.
Alternative energy Biden would expand renewable energy tax credits and credits for residential energy efficiency and restore the Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) and the Electric Vehicle Tax Credit.


If you have questions about your specific situation, please contact us. We’re here to help.

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Biden's tax plan and what may change from current tax law