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CARES Act funding deadlines: Update for FQHCs and RHCs

04.27.20

Read this if you are an administrator, manager, or director at a Rural Health Clinic (RHC) or Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC).

The following outlines key due dates related to various CARES Act funding streams that you may have received. Updated as of April 27, 2020.

1. Round two of the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) was just signed last week. If you have not applied and plan to do so, please do so ASAP as the funds are likely to be exhausted quickly.
2. Your 12-month budget for the CARES Act funding is due on May 8, 2020. As you prepare your budget, please consider the following:
a. If you were lucky enough to get approved for PPP loans, use these funds first to pay for salaries and wages as they are for eight weeks only.
b. We encourage including federal grant expenses in all budget categories to enable you to take advantage of the flexibility HRSA has provided you by allowing reclassifications between budget categories up to the lesser of 25% of the federal award or $250,000 without asking for prior approval. If you wish to reclassify amounts to a budget category which didn’t previously have federal funds budgeted, you will have to submit a budget revision to HRSA for approval. This guidance applies to your base 330 grant as well. 
c. Remember, if an employee is paid more than $197,300 (Executive II salary level as of January 1, 2020), you can only charge $197,300 to any HRSA grant. This salary limitation does not apply to consultants or contracted employees.
d. Use of these funds is very likely to undergo audits, similar to the ARRA funding a number of years ago, therefore make sure you properly track how you use these funds (audit trail).
e. Have your personnel policies been modified for consistency with any new practices you’ve implemented as a result of the public health emergency (for example, hazard pay, family and sick leave and remote working)?

Click here for a list of HRSA’s examples of the allowable uses of the CARES Act funding.    
 
3. The initial distribution you received on April 20, 2020 from the CARES Act Provider Relief Fund has an attestation due on May 10, 2020. There are various provisions governing the use of the funds and we suggest you consider the ability to use these funds to offset lost earnings so you do not have to complete with the other funding programs you have received.

Related Professionals

Read this if you are an administrator, manager, or director at a Rural Health Clinic (RHC) or Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC).

CMS just released an article outlining new and expanded flexibilities for RHCs and FQHCs during the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE). The article includes the following information:

  • Payment rate for telehealth services
  • How to bill for telehealth services
  • Expanded virtual communications services

Payment for telehealth health services during the PHE (from January 27, 2020 through the end of the PHE) is $92. Billing for telehealth is segmented into two periods:

  1. January 27, 2020 – June 30, 2020, bill using the 95 modifier
  2. July 1, 2020 – end of PHE, bill using code G2025

The article further outlines that for telehealth services billed through June 30, they will be paid at the PPS rate. The claims will then be automatically reprocessed in July and a recoupment will occur for the difference between the $92 and your PPS rate. 

It will be important for you to keep track of the telehealth visits paid at your PPS rate and what the recoupment by Medicare will be so that when it occurs you will not be caught unawares.

Virtual communication services have been expanded to include digital evaluation and management services. Online digital evaluation and management services are non-face-to-face, patient initiated, digital communications using a secure patient portal. 

Additionally, the payment rate for these services will be $24.76 beginning March 1, 2020 through the end of the PHE instead of the CY 2020 rate of $13.53, and should bill using code G0071. 

Consider how the medical records component of your system interfaces with the billing component to ensure you capture these services for billing.

The full article can be accessed here: MLN Matters Special Edition Article 20016.
 

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CMS expands flexibility for RHCs and FQHCs

Read this if you are a director, manager, or administrator at a Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) or Rural Health Clinic (RHC).

The latest COVID-19 bill, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act included enhancing Medicare telehealth services for FQHCs and RHCs. This legislation waives the Section 1834(m) restriction on FQHCs and RHCs that prohibits them from serving as distant sites. This means during the COVID-19 State of Emergency, FQHCs and RHCs will be able to serve as distant sites to provide telehealth services to patients in their homes and other eligible locations. The legislation will reimburse FQHCs and RHCs at a rate that is similar to payment for comparable telehealth services under the physician fee schedule (Medicare Part B). FQHCs and RHCs will not be paid the Medicare PPS rate for these services.

Currently, Medicare, unlike many Medicaid programs and commercial payers, still requires the video component for telehealth. Effective immediately, the Office for Civil Rights at the Department of Health and Human Services will exercise its enforcement discretion and will not impose penalties for noncompliance with the regulatory requirements under the HIPAA Rules against covered health care providers in connection with the good faith provision of telehealth during the COVID-19 State of Emergency. Providers who want to use audio or video communication technology to provide telehealth during the COVID-19 State of Emergency can use any non-public facing remote communication product that is available to communicate with patients. Examples of acceptable platforms (non-public facing) include Apple FaceTime, Google G Suite Hangouts Meet, and Skype for Business.

We would also like to remind you of the ability to bill for virtual communication services. Virtual communication services are a brief, non-face-to-face check-in with a patient via communication technology, to assess whether the patient's condition necessitates an office visit. The call must be initiated by the patient and to be billable, the call must be between the patient and a physician, nurse practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse midwife, clinical psychologist, or clinical social worker. If the discussion is conducted by a nurse, health educator, or other clinical personnel, it is not billable as a virtual communication service. There is no video component required for virtual communication services. The check-in cannot relate to a visit with the patient during the previous seven days or result in a visit with the patient within the next 24 hours (or next available appointment). Read the FAQs from Medicare on the virtual communication services.

We continue to be here to support you. If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to reach out to any of us. 

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The CARES Act and telehealth services for FQHCs

The Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2020, which provides $8.3 billion in emergency funding for federal agencies to respond to the COVID-19 outbreak, has earmarked $100 million for FQHCs to prevent, prepare for, and respond to the COVID-19 national emergency. Pre-award costs will be supported by this funding and may date back to January 20, 2020. We recommend tracking your expenditures related to the coronavirus to the best of your ability. This may be helpful or necessary in providing your organization much needed financial relief.  

As a reminder, FQHCs cannot bill Medicare for telehealth services under the PPS rate. Telehealth can be billed to Medicare under Part B with the FQHC as an originating site and reimbursement is approximately $26. If you do not have home visits on Form 5, be sure to add home visits to 5C as soon as possible.

Amidst rapid hourly changes in contending with the coronavirus and its far-reaching impacts, we are sharing some HRSA and CMS guidance that may be helpful to you: 

Here is a link to HRSA FAQs related to COVID-19

Although we are working remotely, we are available to support you. If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to reach out to any of us.

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COVID-19 emergency funding for FQHCs: What you need to know

Read this if your organization, business, or institution is receiving financial assistance as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Updated: August 5, 2020

Many for-profit and not-for-profit organizations are receiving financial assistance as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic. While there has been some guidance, there are still many unanswered questions. One unanswered question has been whether or not any of this financial assistance will be subject to the Single Audit Act. Good news―there’s finally some guidance:

  • For organizations receiving financial assistance through the Small Business Administration (SBA) Payroll Protection Program (PPP), the SBA made the determination that financial assistance is not subject to the Single Audit.
  • The other common type of financial assistance through the SBA is the Emergency Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program. The SBA has made the determination that as these are direct loans with the federal government, they will be subject to the Single Audit. 

It is unlikely there will be guidance within the 2020 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Compliance Supplement related to testing the EIDL program, as the Compliance Supplement anticipated in June 2020 will not have any specific information relative to COVID-19. The OMB announced they will likely be issuing an addendum to the June supplement information specific to COVID-19 by September 2020.

Small- and medium-sized for-profit organizations, and now not-for-profit organizations, are able to access funds through the Main Street Lending Program, which is comprised of the Main Street New Loan Facility, the Main Street Priority Loan Facility, the Main Street Expanded Loan Facility, the Nonprofit Organization New Loan Facility, and the Nonprofit Organization Expanded Loan Facility. We do not currently know how, or if, the Single Audit Act will apply to these loans. Term sheets and frequently asked questions can be accessed on the Federal Reserve web page for the Main Street Lending Program.

Not-for-profits have also received additional financial assistance to help during the COVID-19 pandemic, through Medicare and Medicaid, and through the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund (HEERF). While no definitive guidance has been received, HEERF funds, which are distributed through the Department of Education’s Education Stabilization Fund, have been assigned numbers in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance, which seems to indicate they will be subject to audit. We are currently awaiting guidance if these programs will be subject to the Single Audit Act and will update this blog as that information becomes available.

Healthcare providers are able to access Provider Relief Funds (PRF) through the US Department of Health & Human Services. PRF help with healthcare-related expenses or lost revenue attributable to COVID-19. Guidance on what qualifies as a healthcare-related expense or lost revenue is still in process, and regular updates are posted on the FAQs of the US Department of Health & Human Services website. According to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), PRF funds will be subject to the Single Audit Act requirements. It is important to note that while an organization may have received funds exceeding the threshold, it is the expenditure of these funds that counts toward the Single Audit threshold.

If you have questions about accounting for, or reporting on, funds that you have received as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, please contact a member of our Single Audit Team. We’re here to help.

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COVID-19: Single audit and uniform guidance clarifications

Read this if your organization, business, or institution is receiving financial assistance as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Updated: September 8, 2020

We expect to receive guidance on how to determine what qualifies as lost revenue sometime in the fall, and will post additional information when that becomes available. If you would like the information sent to you directly, please contact Grant Ballantyne.

New information continues to surface about the reporting requirements of the CARES Act Provider Relief Funds (PRFs). The most recent news published by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) states the funds will be subject to the Single Audit Act requirements. What does this mean and how does it impact your organization? Here’s a brief synopsis. 

A Single Audit (often referred to as a Uniform Guidance audit) is required when total federal grant expenditures for an organization exceed $750,000 in a fiscal year. It is important to note that while an organization may have received funds exceeding the threshold, it is the expenditure of these funds that counts toward the Single Audit threshold.  

PRFs help with healthcare-related expenses or lost revenue attributable to COVID-19. Guidance on what qualifies as a healthcare-related expense or lost revenue is still in process, and regular updates are posted on the FAQs of the US Department of Health & Human Services website.

You may remember, there were originally quarterly reporting requirements related to PRFs. On June 13, 2020 HHS updated their FAQ document to reflect a change in quarterly reporting requirements related to PRFs. According to the updated language, “Recipients of Provider Relief Fund payments do not need to submit a separate quarterly report to HHS or the Pandemic Response Accountability Committee. HHS will develop a report containing all information necessary for recipients of Provider Relief Fund payments to comply with this provision.”

Organizations that receive more than $150,000 in PRFs must still submit reports to ensure compliance with the conditions of the relief funds, but the content of the reports and dates on which these are due is yet to be determined (as of August 4, 2020). The key distinction to remember here is that this limit is based on total funds received, regardless of whether or not expenditures have been made. 

As more information comes out, we will update our website. At the moment the main takeaways are:

  • Expending $750,000 of combined relief funds and other federal awards will trigger a Single Audit
  • Receiving $150,000 of PRFs will cause reporting requirements, on a to-be-determined basis
  • Tracking PRF expenditures throughout the fiscal year will be essential for the dual purpose of reporting expenditures and accumulating any potential Single Audit support

If you would like to speak with a BerryDunn professional about reporting under the Single Audit Act, please contact a member of our Single Audit Team.

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Provider Relief Funds Single Audit

Read this if your company is considering outsourced information technology services.

For management, it’s the perennial question: Keep things in-house or outsource?

For management, it’s the perennial question: Keep things in-house or outsource? Most companies or organizations have outsourcing opportunities, from revenue cycle to payment processing to IT security. When deciding whether to outsource, you weigh the trade-offs and benefits by considering variables such as cost, internal expertise, cross coverage, and organizational risk.

In IT services, outsourcing may win out as technology becomes more complex. Maintaining expertise and depth for all the IT components in an environment can be resource-intensive.

Outsourced solutions allow IT teams to shift some of their focus from maintaining infrastructure to getting more value out of existing systems, increasing data analytics, and better linking technology to business objectives. The same can be applied to revenue cycle outsourcing, shifting the focus from getting clean bills out and cash coming in, to looking at the financial health of the organization, analyzing service lines, patient experience, or advancing projects.  

Once you’ve decided, there’s another question you need to ask
Lost sometimes in the discussion of whether to use outsourced services is how. Even after you’ve done your due diligence and chosen a great vendor, you need to stay involved. It can be easy to think, “Vendor XYZ is monitoring our servers or our days in AR, so we should be all set. I can stop worrying at night about our system reliability or our cash flow.” Not true.

You may be outsourcing a component of your technology environment or collections, but you are not outsourcing the accountability for it—from an internal administrative standpoint or (in many cases) from a legal standpoint.

Beware of a false state of confidence
No matter how clear the expectations and rules of engagement with your vendor at the onset of a partnership, circumstances can change—regulatory updates, technology advancements, and old-fashioned vendor neglect. In hiring the vendor, you are accountable for oversight of the partnership. Be actively engaged in the ongoing execution of the services. Also, periodically revisit the contract, make sure the vendor is following all terms, and confirm (with an outside audit, when appropriate) that you are getting the services you need.

Take, for example, server monitoring, which applies to every organization or company, large or small, with data on a server. When a managed service vendor wants to contract with you to provide monitoring services, the vendor’s salesperson will likely assure you that you need not worry about the stability of your server infrastructure, that the monitoring will catch issues before they occur, and that any issues that do arise will be resolved before the end user is impacted. Ideally, this is true, but you need to confirm.

Here’s how to stay involved with your vendor
Ask lots of questions. There’s never a question too small. Here are samples of how precisely you should drill down:

  • What metrics will be monitored, specifically?
  • Why do the metrics being monitored matter to our own business objectives?
  • What thresholds must be met to notify us or produce an alert?
  • What does exceeding a threshold mean to our business?
  • Who on our team will be notified if an alert is warranted?
  • What corrective action will be taken?

Ask uncomfortable questions
Being willing to ask challenging questions of your vendors, even when you are not an expert, is critical. You may feel uncomfortable but asking vendors to explain something to you in terms you understand is very reasonable. They’re the experts; you’re not expected to already understand every detail or you wouldn’t have needed to hire them. It’s their job to explain it to you. Without asking these questions, you may end up with a fairly generic solution that does produce a service or monitor something, but not necessarily all the things you need.

Ask obvious questions
You don’t want anything to slip by simply because you or the vendor took it for granted. It is common to assume that more is being done by a vendor than actually is. By asking even obvious questions, you can avoid this trap. All too often we conduct an IT assessment and are told that a vendor is providing a service, only to discover that the tasks are not happening as expected.

You are accountable for your whole team—in-house and outsourced members
An outsourced solution is an extension of your team. Taking an active and engaged role in an outsourcing partnership remains consistent with your management responsibilities. At the end of the day, management is responsible for achieving business objectives and mission. Regularly check in to make sure that the vendor stays focused on that same mission.

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Oxymoron of the month: Outsourced accountability

Read this if you are a leader at a state Medicaid agency, Long-Term Care Hospital, Rural Health Clinic, Federally Qualified Health Center, or intermediate care facility.

The new fact sheet from CMS provides state and local governments that may be developing alternate care sites with information on how to receive payments for acute inpatient and outpatient care through federal programs, including Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

CMS notes that it is easiest for an existing enrolled hospital or health system to obtain payments through CMS programs for covered health care services furnished at the ACS by treating the ACS as a short-term extension of their current ‘brick-and-mortar’ facilities. 

State and local governments that want to build a hospital ACS have three options if they wish to be paid by CMS for providing covered hospital inpatient and outpatient services:

  1. Transfer operation and billing for care delivered in the ACS to a hospital or health system which is enrolled
  2. Enroll the ACS as a new hospital in CMS programs
  3. As an alternative, instead of making facility payments, enrolled physicians or other non-physician practitioners may bill for covered services that they furnish at the ACS

CMS guidance to states on implementing the optional COVID-19 testing group 

CMS has provided new guidance to states who may be planning to implement the Optional COVID-19 Testing Group, which was established by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) for uninsured individuals in order to furnish COVID-19 testing and associated services.

  • The guidance from CMS outlines the different requirements connected with implementing the uninsured group, inclusive of eligibility and enrollment, data reporting, and claims. 
  • The guidance also describes flexibilities available to help states achieve implementation of the new group and strategies to meet related requirements. 
  • For more information related to the eligibility requirements and the Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) available for coverage, states can also refer to Section B of the FFCRA and Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) posted April 13, 2020.

CMS announces enhanced enforcement actions based on nursing home COVID-19 data and inspection results

Earlier in the month of June, CMS released new guidelines related to enforcement for nursing homes who may have violations of infection control practices.

  • CMS intends to apportion $80 million in CARES Act funding to states in order to increase infection control surveys. With CARES Act funding, states will be required to carry out on-site surveys of nursing homes with previous COVID-19 outbreaks, in addition to nursing homes with newly confirmed cases.
  • CMS will make technical assistance available in support of this effort through Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs) for nursing homes to assist in establishing best practices for infection control.
  • States are required to submit 100% of focused surveys of their nursing homes to CMS by July 31, 2020. It should be noted that submission delays may result in reductions to a state’s Cares Act allocation for FFY 2021.

HHS announces 45-day compliance deadline extension for providers

On May 22, The Department of Health and Human Service (HHS) announced a 45-day extension to the deadline for providers who are receiving payments from the Provider Relief Fund to accept the necessary terms and conditions of the payments.

  • Should providers wish to keep funds—which may have been automatically dispersed—they must agree to the terms and conditions of the Provider Relief Fund.
  • In order to support impacted facilities there is $50 billion in available COVID-19 relief funding for distribution to providers that bill for Medicare beneficiaries.
  • The announcement from HHS gives providers 90 days from the original receipt date of a payment to accept the terms and conditions.  Alternatively, providers may choose to return the funds.

HHS announces $4.9 billion distribution to nursing facilities impacted by COVID-19

HHS has announced it has begun the distribution of additional relief funds to Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs) in order to address ongoing needs related to COVID-19. Such needs include labor, improving testing capacity, and obtaining personal protective equipment as well as additional expenses specifically linked to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • HHS intends to make the fund distributions to SNFs on both a fixed and variable basis. 
  • Each eligible SNF will receive a fixed dissemination of $50,000 in addition to an allotment of $2,500 per bed. All certified SNFs with six or more certified beds will be eligible for this distribution.
  • Recipients of these funds must attest that they will use Provider Relief Fund payments for allowed purposes under the terms and conditions as well as agree to comply with future audit and reporting requirements.

We’re here to help. If you have more questions or want to have an in-depth conversation about your specific situation, please contact the Medicaid consulting team

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CMS releases new guidance on Alternate Care Sites, the optional COVID-19 testing group, and more