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The IRS announced plans to conduct examinations of the universal availability requirements for 403(b) plans (Plans) this summer. Noncompliance with these requirements results in operational errors for Plans―ultimately requiring correction. Plan sponsors should review their Plans for proper inclusion and exclusion of employees. Such review can help you avoid costly penalties if the IRS does conduct an examination and uncovers an issue with the Plan’s implementation of universal availability.

Of all the changes that came with the sweeping Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) in late 2017, none has prompted as big a response from our clients as the changes TCJA makes to the qualified parking deduction.

Last week, in addition to The Eagles Greatest Hits (1971-1975) album becoming the highest selling album of all time, overtaking Michael Jackson’s Thriller, the IRS issued Notice 2018-67—its first formal guidance on Internal Revenue Code Section 512(a)(6).

Four steps to take if you get an ACA Tax Penalty Notice from the IRS. It’s been almost a year since the IRS filing deadline for 2015 Forms 1094-C and 1095-C. Most expected the IRS to issue employer penalty notices related to the 2015 calendar year in late 2016.

With the most recent overhaul to the Form 990, Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax, the IRS has made clear its intention to increase the transparency of a not-for-profit organization’s mission and activities and to promote active governance. To point, the IRS asks whether a copy has been provided to an organization’s board prior to filing and requires organizations to describe the process, if any, its board undertakes to review the 990.

Editor’s note: read this if you are a leader in a healthcare organization and have questions concerning the current definition of health care provider in recent legislation regarding COVID-19.

One of the more common questions we receive regarding the paid sick and family leave provisions of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the “Act”) is regarding which employees qualify as a “health care provider”, who an organization can elect to exempt from the paid sick and family leave provisions of the Act. The Department of Labor (DOL) has issued FAQs and temporary regulations addressing the issue.

For purposes of determining employees who could be exempt from the paid sick and family leave provisions of the Act, the definition of a “health care provider” has been broadened. It now includes “anyone employed at any doctor’s office, hospital, health care center, clinic, post-secondary educational institution offering health care instructions, medical school, local health department or agency, nursing facility, retirement facility, nursing home, home health care provider, any facility that performs laboratory or medical testing, pharmacy, or any similar institution, employer, or entity”. 

This includes any permanent or temporary institution, facility, location, or site where medical services are provided that are similar to such institutions. 

Additionally, the definition includes any individual employed by an entity that contracts with any of the above institutions to provide services or to maintain the operation of the facility. This also includes anyone employed by any entity that provides medical services, produces medical products, or is otherwise involved in the making of COVID-19 related medical equipment, tests, drugs, vaccines, diagnostic vehicles, or treatments. 

The DOL guidance also indicates the definition includes any individual the highest official of a state determines is a health care provider needed for the state’s response to COVID-19. 

For purposes of the health care provider exclusion for the sick and family leave provisions of the Act, the newly released DOL temporary regulations provide that the term health care provider is not limited to diagnosing medical professionals. Rather, such health care providers include any individual who is capable of providing health care services necessary to combat the COVID-19 public health emergency. Such individuals include not only medical professionals, but also other workers who are needed to keep hospitals and similar health care facilities well supplied and operational.

The DOL encourages employers to be judicious when using this definition to exempt health care providers to minimize the spread of COVID-19.

It is important to note that the preambles to the temporary regulations indicate an employer’s exercise of this option (i.e., to exclude a health care provider or emergency responder from the paid sick/family leave benefits) does not authorize an employer to prevent an employee who is a health care provider from taking earned or accrued leave in accordance with established employer policies.

The preamble to the temporary regulations further indicates the paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave provisions of the Act exist so employees will not be forced to choose between their paychecks and the individual and public health measures necessary to combat COVID-19. The preambles further state, conversely, providing paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave does not come at the expense of fully staffing the necessary functions of society.

Organizations face a difficult decision whether to exempt health care providers (and emergency responders) from the paid sick and family leave provisions of the Act. It is not an easy decision to make, and an organization may want to contact legal counsel to understand the legal implications with respect to the decision to exclude health care providers (or emergency responders). 

An organization trying to decide whether to exclude health care professionals (or emergency responders) should consider the following:

  • These employees can’t be prevented from taking paid time off under the organization’s existing paid time off guidelines.
  • Any decision related to the paid sick/family leave provisions doesn’t affect an employee’s eligibility to take FMLA leave under the normal FMLA rules.
  • The organization may want to include health care professionals (and emergency responders) in the sick leave provisions of the Act so the organization can be eligible for tax credits if an employee is diagnosed with or has symptoms of COVID-19 or is caring for an individual diagnosed with or who has symptoms of COVID-19. 
  • An organization may be able to elect to exclude health care providers (and first responders) from only the paid family leave provisions of the Act.

Ultimately, each organization must make a decision in the best interests of their business, their employees, and their consumers. Unfortunately, there is no single best answer that covers all organizations struggling with this decision. 

If the decision is made to exclude health care providers from all or a portion of the paid sick and family leave provisions of the Act, we recommend contacting your legal counsel to review the employee communications before it is provided to employees.

For more information
If you have more questions, or have a specific question about your particular situation, please call us. We’re here to help. 

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"Health care providers" and Department of Labor regulations under COVID-19

BerryDunn’s Healthcare/Not-for-Profit Practice Group members have been working closely with our clients as they navigate the effect that the COVID-19 pandemic will have on their ability to sustain and advance their missions.

We have collected several of the questions we received, and the answers provided, so that you may also benefit from this information. We will be updating our COVID-19 Resources page regularly. If you have a question you would like to have answered, please contact Sarah Belliveau, Not-for-Profit Practice Area leader, at sbelliveau@berrydunn.com.

The following questions and answers have been compiled into the following categories: stabilization, cash flow, financial reporting, endowments and investments, employee benefits, and additional considerations.

STABILIZATION
Q: Is all relief focused on small to mid-size organizations? What can larger nonprofit organizations participate in for relief?
A:

We have learned that there is an as-yet-to-be-defined loan program to be provided to mid-sized employers between 500-10,000 employees. You can find information in this document Loans Available for Nonprofits in the CARES Act as well as on the Independent Sector CARES Act web page, which will be updated regularly.

Q: Should I perform financial modeling so I can understand the impact this will have on my organization? Things are moving so fast, how do I know what federal programs are available to provide assistance?
A:

The first step in developing a short-term model to navigate the next few months is to gain an understanding of the programs available to provide assistance. These resources summarize some information about available programs:

Loans Available for Nonprofits in the CARES Act
Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA): FAQs for Businesses
CARES Act Tax Provisions for Not-for-Profit Organizations

The next step is to develop scenarios ranging from best case to worst case to analyze the potential impact of revenue and/or cost reductions on the organization. Modeling out the various options available to you will help to determine which program is best for your organization. Each program achieves a different objective – for instance:

  • The Paycheck Protection Program can assist in retaining employees in the short-term.
  • The Emergency Economic Injury Grants are helpful in covering a small immediate liquidity need.
  • The Small Business Debt Relief Program provides aid to those concerned with making SBA loan payments.

Additionally, consider non-federal options, such as discussing short-term deferrals with your current bank.

Q: How should I create a financial forecast/model for the next year?
A:

If you have the benefit of waiting, this is likely a time period in which it makes sense to delay significant in-depth forecasting efforts, particularly if your business environment is complicated or subject to significantly volatility as a result of recent events. The concern with beginning to model for future periods, outside of the next 3-6 months, is that you’ll be using information that is incomplete and ever-changing. This could lead to snap judgements that are short-term in nature and detrimental to long-term planning and success of your organization. 
With that said, we recognize that delaying this analysis will be unsettling to many CFOs and business managers who need to have a strategy moving forward. In developing this model for next year, consider the following elements of a strong model:

  1. Flexible and dynamic – Allow room for the model to adapt as more information is available and as additional insight is requested by your constituents (board members, department heads, lenders, etc.).
  2. Prioritize – Start with your big-ticket items. These should be the items that drive results for the organization. Determine what your top 2-3 revenue and expense categories are and focus on wrapping your arms around the future of those. From there, look for other revenue and expense sources that show correlation with one of the big 2-3. Using a dynamic model, these should be automatically updated when assumptions on correlated items change. Don’t waste time on items that likely don’t impact decision making. Finally, build consensus on baseline assumptions, whether it be through management or accounting team, the board, or finance committee.
  3. Stress-test – Provide for the reality that your assumptions, and thus model, will be wrong. Develop scenarios that run from best-case to worst-case. Be honest with your assumptions.
  4. Identify levers – As you complete stress-testing, identify your action plan under different circumstances. What are expenditures that can be deferred in a worst-case scenario? What does staffing look like at various levels?
  5. Cash is king – The focus on forecasting and modeling is often on the net income of the organization and the cash flows generated. In a time such as this, the exercise is likely to focus on future liquidity. Remember to consider your non-income and expense items that impact cash flow, such as principal payments on debt service, planned additions to property & equipment, receipts on pledge payments, and others.  
CASH FLOW
Q: How can I alleviate cash flow strain in the near term?
A:

While the House and Senate have reacted quickly to bring needed relief to individuals and businesses across the country, the reality for most is that more will need to be done to stabilize. Operationally, obvious responses in the short term should be to eliminate all nonessential purchasing and maximize the billing and collection functions in accounts receivable. Another option is to utilize or increase an existing line of credit, or establish a new line of credit, to alleviate short term cash flow shortfalls. Organizations with investment portfolios can consider the prudence of increasing the spending draw on those funds. Rather than making a few drastic changes, organizations should take a multi-faceted approach to reduce the strain on cash flow while protecting the long term sustainability of the mission.

Q: How can I increase my organization’s reach to help with disaster relief? If we establish a special purpose fund, what should my organization be thinking about?
A:

Many organizations are looking for ways to increase their direct impact and give funding to individuals or organizations they may not have historically supported. For those who are want to expand their grant or gift making or want to establish a disaster relief fund, there are things to consider when doing so to help protect the organization. The nonprofit experts at Hemenway & Barnes shares their thoughts on just how to do that.

FINANCIAL REPORTING
Q: What accounting standards have been delayed or are in the process of being delayed?
A:

FASB:
The $2.2 trillion stimulus package includes a provision that would allow banks the temporary option to delay compliance with the current expected credit losses (CECL) accounting standard. This would be delayed until the earlier of the end of the fiscal year or the end of the coronavirus national emergency.

GASB:
On March 26, 2020, the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) announced it has added a project to its current technical agenda to consider postponing all Statement and Implementation Guide provisions with an effective date that begins on or after reporting periods beginning after June 15, 2018. The GASB has received numerous requests from state and local government officials and public accounting firms regarding postponing the upcoming effective dates of pronouncements as these state and local government offices are closed and officials do not have access to the information needed to implement the Statements. Most notably this would include Statement No. 84, Fiduciary Activities, and Statement No. 87, Leases.

The Board plans to consider an Exposure Draft for issuance in April and finalize the guidance in May 2020.

ENDOWMENTS AND INVESTMENTS 
Q: What should I consider with regard to endowments?
A:

Many nonprofits with endowments are considering ways to balance an increased reliance on their investment portfolios with the responsibility to protect and preserve the spending power of donor-restricted gifts. Some things to think about include the existence (or absence) of true restrictions, spending variations under the Uniform Prudent Management of Institutional Funds Act (UPMIFA) applicable in your state, borrowing from an endowment, or requesting from the donor the release of restrictions. All need to be balanced with the intended duration and preservation of the endowment fund. Hemenway & Barnes shares their thoughts relative to the utilization of endowments during this time of need.

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS
Q: We are going to suspend our retirement plan match through June 30, 2020 and I picked a start date of April 1st. What we need help with is our bi-weekly payroll (which is for HOURLY employees). Their next pay date is April 3rd, for time worked through March 28th. Time worked March 29-31 would be paid on April 17th. How should we handle the match during this period for the hourly employees?
A:

The key for determining what to include for the matching calculation is when it is paid, not when it was earned. If the amendment is effective April 1st, then any amounts paid after April 1st would not have matching contributions calculated. This means that the amounts paid on April 3rd would not have any matching contributions calculated.

Q: Can you please provide guidance on the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) and how it may impact my organization?
A:

On March 30th, BerryDunn published a blog post to help answer your questions around the FFCRA.

If you have additional questions, please contact one of our Employee Benefit Plan professionals

ADDITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS
Q: I heard there was going to be an incentive for charitable giving in the new act. What's that all about?
A:

According to Sections 2204 and 2205 of the CARES Act:

  • Up to $300 of charitable contributions can be taken as a deduction in calculating adjusted gross income (AGI) for the 2020 tax year. This will provide a tax benefit even to those who do not itemize.
  • For the 2020 tax year, the tax cap has been lifted for:
    • Individuals-from 60% of AGI to 100%
    • Corporations-annual limit is raised from 10% to 25% (for food donations this is raised from 15% to 25%)
Q: Have you heard if the May 15th tax deadline will be extended?
A:

Unfortunately, we have not heard. As of April 6th, the deadline has not been extended.

Q: Could you please summarize for me the tax provisions in the CARES Act that you think are most applicable to not-for-profits?
A: Absolutely! Our not-for-profit tax professionals have compiled this document, which provides a high level outline of tax provisions in the CARES Act that wde believe would be of interest to our clients.

We are here to help
Please contact the BerryDunn not-for-profit team if you have any questions, or would like to discuss your specific situation.

Blog
COVID-19 FAQs—Not-for-Profit Edition

Editor's note: read this if you are a leader in higher education. 

The Department of Education’s Office of Postsecondary Education posted an Electronic Announcement on April 3, 2020, to provide an update to the policy and operational guidance issued in March as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic national emergency. 

In addition to extending the March 5, 2020 guidance to apply to payment periods or terms beginning between March 5, 2020 and June 1, 2020, the Department has confirmed the temporary closure will not result in loss of institutional eligibility or participation. A few other changes to note:

  • Leaves of absence due to COVID-19-related concerns or limitations (such as interruption of a travel-abroad program) can be requested after the date the leave has begun.
  • Updates to the academic calendar requirements will allow institutions to offer courses on a schedule that would otherwise cause the program to be considered a non-standard term if it allows students to complete the term.
  • Calculated expected family contribution amounts will exclude from income any grants or low-interest loans received by victims of an emergency from a federal or state entity as part of the needs analysis.

One trend that continues to permeate the Department’s guidance is for institutions to document, as contemporaneously as possible, actions taken as a result of COVID-19 (including professional judgment decisions, on a case-by-case basis). 

The Department will be issuing more guidance on the impact of the CARES Act on R2T4 calculations, satisfactory academic progress requirements, the extension of the single audit by the Office of Management and Budget, and the potential impact to future FISAP filings. We highly recommend you read the full announcement as it outlines a wide variety of important details. 

Questions? Please contact Renee Bishop, Sarah Belliveau, or Mark LaPrade. We’re here to help.


 

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COVID-19: Department of Education operational guidance

As resources are released to help higher education institutions navigate the rapidly changing landscape, we will add important links and information to this blog post:

Industry resources:
US Department of Education

Guidance for colleges:
How might colleges benefit from the coronavirus stimulus package?

We are here to help
Please contact the BerryDunn higher education team if you have any questions, or would like to discuss your specific situation.

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Resources for higher education institutions affected by COVID-19