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When time is money: Reviewing your planning and development service fees

07.26.19

Read this if you are a City/County Administrator, Building Official, Community Development Director, Planning Director, Development Services Manager or work with customers providing a service for a fee.

Planning and development service fees are, for many municipalities, often discussed but rarely changed. There are a number of reasons you might need to consider or defend your fee structure―complaints from developers, rising costs of operation, and changes in code or process are just a few. 

But when is the right time for a formal review of your service fees? There are several key organizational factors that should prompt an in-depth study of your fees, either internally or with the assistance of an objective advisor. It may be time for an update if:

  • You’re considering a new permitting system. New technology may streamline your workflows, simplify processes for your customers, or necessitate changes in your staffing. All of these secondary changes can impact the cost of your services. In addition, if you’re anticipating significant changes to your fee structure or methodology (e.g., moving to full cost recovery), you’ll want to configure your new system to support that going forward.
  • You have an enterprise development fund. Development fees are collected to cover the cost of providing a service. The methodology you use to charge fees should be based on defensible formulas that can withstand the scrutiny of your customers and cover the cost to provide the service. In addition, reserve funds should be adequate to ensure your development service is funded through the completion of the project. 
  • The regulations in your municipality are changing. Perhaps your organization is moving to a unified or form-based code or making changes to the International Building or Fire Codes. Changes in the process and requirements for development may require a reevaluated fee structure.
  • It’s been a while. Even if your organization is not experiencing any significant or sweeping change, small shifts can accumulate over the years, resulting in significant fee adjustments that may be tough for you to implement and for your customers to understand. Periodically reviewing service demand and benchmarking your individual fees against those of neighboring communities can help to avoid sticker shock.

If any of these scenarios sound familiar, you may want to consider a fee review, which may consist of benchmarking against similar jurisdictions. Not sure what level of review your organization needs? Our dedicated government consultants include former planners and community development leaders who have walked in your shoes and can talk through the considerations with you.
 

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  • Kevin Price
    Senior Manager
    Community Development, Government Utilities
    P 207.541.2379

Read this if your organization, business, or institution has leases and you’ve been eagerly awaiting and planning for the implementation of the new lease standards.

Ready? Set? Not yet. As we have prepared for and experienced delays related to Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Codification Topic 842, Leases, and Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 87, Leases, we thought the time had finally come for implementation. With the challenges that COVID-19 has brought to everyone, the FASB and GASB recognize the significant impact COVID-19 has had on commercial businesses, state and local governments, and not-for-profits and both have proposed delays in effective dates for various accounting standards, including both lease standards.

But wait, there’s more! In response to feedback FASB received during the comment period for the lease standard, the revenue recognition standard has also been extended. We didn’t see that coming, and expect that many organizations that didn’t opt for early adoption will breathe a collective sigh of relief.

FASB details and a deeper dive

On May 20, 2020, FASB voted to delay the effective date of the lease standard and the revenue recognition standard. A formal Accounting Standards Update (ASU) summarizing these changes will be released early June. Here’s what we know now:

  • Revenue recognition―for entities that have not yet issued financial statements, the effective date of the application of FASB Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 606, Revenue Recognition, has been delayed by 12 months (effective for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019). This does not apply to public entities or nonpublic entities that are conduit debt obligors who previously adopted this guidance.
  • Leases―for entities that have not yet adopted the guidance from ASC 842, Leases, the effective date has been extended by 12 months (effective for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2021).
  • Early adoption of either standard is still allowed.

FASB has also provided clarity on lease concessions that are highlighted in Topic 842. 

We recognize many lessors are making concessions due to the pandemic. Under current guidance in Topics 840 and 842, changes to lease contracts that were not included in the original lease are generally accounted for as lease modifications and, therefore, a separate contract. This would require remeasurement of the new lease contract and related right-of-use asset. 

FASB recognized this issue and has published a FASB Staff Questions and Answers (Q&A) Document, Topic 842 and Topic 840: Accounting for Lease Concessions Related to the Effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic. Under this new guidance, if lease concessions are made relating to COVID-19, entities do not need to analyze each contract to determine if a new contract has been entered into, and will have the option to apply, or not to apply, the lease modification provisions of Topics 840 and 842.

GASB details

On May 8, 2020, GASB issued Statement No. 95, Postponement of the Effective Dates of Certain Authoritative Guidance. GASB 95 extends the implementation dates of several pronouncements including:
•    Statement No. 84, Fiduciary Activities―extended by 12 months (effective for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019)
•    Statement No. 87, Leases―extended by 18 months (effective for reporting periods beginning after June 15, 2021)

More information

If you have questions, please contact a member of our financial statement audit team. For other COVID-19 related resources, please refer to BerryDunn’s COVID-19 Resources Page.
 

Article
May 2020 accounting standard delay status: GASB and FASB

Read this if you are planning for, or are in the process of implementing a new software solution.

User Acceptance Testing (UAT) is more than just another step in the implementation of a software solution. It can verify system functionality, increase the opportunity for a successful project, and create additional training opportunities for your team to adapt to the new software quickly. Independent verification through a structured user acceptance plan is essential for a smooth transition from a development environment to a production environment. 

Verification of functionality

The primary purpose of UAT is to verify that a system is ready to go live. Much of UAT is like performing a pre-flight checklist on an aircraft. Wings... check, engines... check, tires... check. A structured approach to UAT can verify that everything is working prior to rolling out a new software system for everyone to use. 

To hold vendors accountable for their contractual obligations, we recommend an agency test each functional and technical requirement identified in the statement of work portion of their contract. 

It is also recommended that the agency verify the functional and technical requirements that the vendor replied positivity to in the RFP for the system you are implementing. 

Easing the transition to a new software

Operational change management (OCM) is a term that describes a methodology for making the switch to a new software solution. Think of implementing a new software solution like learning a new language. For some employees, the legacy software solution is the only way they know how to do their job. Like learning a new language, changing the way business and learning a new software can be a challenging and scary task. The benefits outweigh the anxiety associated with learning a new language. You can communicate with a broader group of people, and maybe even travel the world! This is also true for learning a new software solution; there are new and exciting ways to perform your job.

Throughout all organizations there will be some employees resistant to change. Getting those employees involved in UAT can help. By involving them in testing the new system and providing feedback prior to implementation, they will feel ownership and be less likely to resist the change. In our experience, some of the most resistant employees, once involved in the process, become the biggest champions of the new system.  

Training and testing for better results

On top of the OCM and verification benefits a structured UAT can accomplish, UAT can be a great training opportunity. An agency needs to be able to perform actions of the tested functionality. For example, if an agency is testing a software’s ability to import a document, then a tester needs to be trained on how to do that task. By performing this task, the tester learns how to login to the software, navigate the software, and perform tasks that the end user will be accomplishing in their daily use of the new software. 

Effective UAT and change management

We have observed agencies that have installed software that was either not fully configured or the final product was not what was expected when the project started. The only way to know that software works how you want is to test it using business-driven scenarios. BerryDunn has developed a UAT process, customizable to each client, which includes a UAT tracking tool. This process and related tool helps to ensure that we inspect each item and develop steps to resolve issues when the software doesn’t function as expected. 

We also incorporate change management into all aspects of a project and find that the UAT process is the optimal time to do so. Following established and proven approaches for change management during UAT is another opportunity to optimize implementation of a new software solution. 

By building a structured approach to UAT, you can enjoy additional benefits, as additional training and OCM benefits can make the difference between forming a positive or a negative reaction to the new software. By conducting a structured and thorough UAT, you can help your users gain confidence in the process, and increase adoption of the new software. 

Please contact the team if you have specific questions relating to your specific needs, or to see how we can help your agency validate the new system’s functionality and reduce resistance to the software. We’re here to help.   
 

Article
User Acceptance Testing: A plan for successful software implementation

The BerryDunn Recovery Advisory Team has compiled this guide to COVID-19 consulting resources for state and local government agencies and higher education institutions.

We have provided a list of our consulting services related to data analysis, CARES Act funding and procurement, and legislation and policy implementation. Many of these services can be procured via the NASPO ValuePoint Procurement Acquisition Support Services contract.

READ THE GUIDE NOW

We're here to help.
If you have any questions, please contact us at info@berrydunn.com

Article
COVID-19 consulting resources

Read this if your organization, business, or institution has leases and you’ve been eagerly awaiting and planning for the implementation of the new lease standards.

Ready? Set? Not yet. As we have prepared for and experienced delays related to Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Codification Topic 842, Leases, we thought the time had finally come for implementation. With the challenges that COVID-19 has brought to everyone, the FASB recognizes the significant impact COVID-19 has brought to commercial businesses and not-for-profits and is proposing a one-year delay in implementation, as described in this article posted to the Journal of Accountancy: FASB effective date delay proposals to include private company lease accounting.

But what about lease concessions? We all recognize many lessors are making concessions due to the pandemic. Under current guidance in Topics 840 and 842, changes to lease contracts that were not included in the original lease are generally accounted for as lease modifications and, therefore, a separate contract. This would require remeasurement of the new lease contract and related right-of-use asset. FASB recognized this issue and has published a FASB Staff Questions and Answers (Q&A) Document,  Topic 842 and Topic 840: Accounting for Lease Concessions Related to the Effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic. Under this new guidance, if lease concessions are made relating to COVID-19, entities do not need to analyze each contract to determine if a new contract has been entered into, and will have the option to apply, or not to apply, the lease modification provisions of Topics 840 and 842.

Implementation of the lease accounting standard will most likely be delayed for Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) entities as well. On April 15, 2020, the GASB issued an exposure draft that would delay most GASB statements and implementation guides due to be implemented for fiscal years 2019 and later. Most notably, this includes Statement 84, Fiduciary Activities, and Statement 87, Leases. Comments on the proposal will be accepted through April 30, and the board plans to consider a final statement for issuance on May 8. More information may be found in this article from the Journal of Accountancy: GASB proposes postponing effective dates due to pandemic.

More information

Whether you are a FASB or GASB entity, you can expect a delay in the implementation of the lease standard. If you have questions, please contact a member of our financial statement audit team. For other COVID-19 related resources, please refer to BerryDunn’s COVID-19 Resources Page.

Article
FASB and GASB news: Postponement of the lease accounting standards

More and more emphasis is being put on cybersecurity by companies of all sizes. Whether it’s the news headlines of notable IT incidents, greater emphasis on the value of data, or the monetization of certain types of attacks, an increasing amount of energy and money is going towards security. Security has the attention of leadership and the board and it is not going away. One of the biggest risks to and vulnerabilities of any organization’s security continues to be its people. Innovative approaches and new technology can reduce risk but they still don’t prevent the damage that can be inflicted by an employee simply opening an attachment or following a link. This is more likely to happen than you may think.

Technology also doesn’t prepare a management team for how to handle the IT response, communication effort, and workforce management required during and after an event. Technology doesn’t lessen the operational impact that your organization will feel when, not if, you experience an event.

So let’s examine the human and operational side of cybersecurity. Below are three factors you should address to reduce risk and prepare your organization for an event:

  1. People: Create and maintain a vigilant workforce
    Ask yourself, “How prepared is our workforce when it comes to security threats and protecting our data? How likely would it be for one of our team members to click on a link or open an attachment that appear to be from our CFO? Would our team members look closely enough at the email address and notice that the organization name is different by one letter?”
     

    According to the 2016 Verizon Data Breach Report, 30% of phishing messages were opened by the target across all campaigns and 12% went on to click on the attachment or link.

    Phishing email attacks directed at your company through your team range from very obvious to extremely believable. Some attempts are sent widely and are looking for just one person to click, while others are extremely targeted and deliberate. In either case, it is vital that each employee takes enough time to realize that the email request is unusual. Perhaps there are strange typos in the request or it is odd the CFO is emailing while on vacation. That moment your employees take to pause and decide whether to click on the link/attachment could mean the difference between experiencing an event or not.

    So how do you create and cultivate this type of thought process in your workforce? Lots of education and awareness efforts. This goes beyond just an annual in-service training on HIPAA. It may include education sessions, emails with tips and tricks, posters describing the risk, and also exercises to test your workforce against phishing and security exploits. It also takes leadership embracing security as a strategic imperative and leading the organization to take it seriously. Once you have these efforts in place, you can create culture change to build and maintain an environment where an employee is not embarrassed to check with the CFO’s office to see if they really did send an email from Bora Bora.
  1. Plan: Implement a disaster recovery and incident response plan 
    Through the years, disaster recovery plans have been the usual response. Mostly, the emphasis has been on recovering data after a non-security IT event, often discussed in context of a fire, power loss, or hardware failure. Increasingly, cyber-attacks are creeping into the forefront of planning efforts. The challenge with cyber-events is that they are murkier to understand – and harder for leadership – to assist with.

    It’s easier to understand the concept of a fire destroying your server room and the plan entailing acquiring new equipment, recovering data from backup, restoring operations, having good downtime procedures, and communicating the restoration efforts along the way. What is much more challenging is if the event begins with a suspicion by employees, customers, or vendors who believe their data has been stolen without any conclusive information that your company is the originating point of the data loss. How do you take action if you know very little about the situation? What do you communicate if you are not sure what to say? It is this level of uncertainty that makes it so difficult. Do you have a plan in place for how to respond to an incident? Here are some questions to consider:
     
    1. How will we communicate internally with our staff about the incident?
    2. How will we communicate with our clients? Our patients? Our community?
    3. When should we call our insurance company? Our attorney?
    4. Is reception prepared to describe what is going on if someone visits our office?
    5. Do we have the technical expertise to diagnose the issue?
    6. Do we have set protocols in place for when to bring our systems off-line and are our downtime procedures ready to use?
    7. When the press gets wind of the situation, who will communicate with them and what will we share?
    8. If our telephone system and network is taken offline, how we will we communicate with our leadership team and workforce?

By starting to ask these questions, you can ascertain how ready you may, or may not be, for a cyber-attack when it comes.

  1. Practice: Prepare your team with table top exercises  
    Given the complexity and diversity of the threats people are encountering today, no single written plan can account for all of the possible combinations of cyber-attacks. A plan can give guidance, set communication protocols, and structure your approach to your response. But by conducting exercises against hypothetical situations, you can test your plan, identify weaknesses in the plan, and also provide your leadership team with insight and experience – before it counts.

    A table top exercise entails one team member (perhaps from IT or from an outside firm) coming up with a hypothetical situation and a series of facts and clues about the situation that are given to your leadership team over time. Your team then implements the existing plans to respond to the incident and make decisions. There are no right or wrong answers in this scenario. Rather, the goal is to practice the decision-making and response process to determine where improvements are needed.

    Maybe you run an exercise and realize that you have not communicated to your staff that no mention of the event should be shared by employees on social media. Maybe the exercise makes you realize that the network administrator who is on vacation at the time is the only one who knows how to log onto the firewall. You might identify specific gaps that are lacking in your cybersecurity coverage. There is much to learn that can help you prepare for the real thing.

As you know, there are many different threats and risks facing organizations. Some are from inside an organization while others come from outside. Simply throwing additional technology at the problem will not sufficiently address the risks. While your people continue to be one of the biggest threats, they can also be one of your biggest assets, in both preventing issues from occurring and then responding quickly and appropriately when they do. Remember focus on your People, Your Plan, and Your Practice.

Article
The three P's of improving your company's cybersecurity soft skills

The COVID-19 emergency has caused CMS (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services) to expand eligibility for expedited payments to Medicare providers and suppliers for the duration of the public health emergency.

Accelerated payments have been available to providers/suppliers in the past due to a disruption in claims submission or claims processing, mainly due to natural disasters. Because of the COVID-19 public health emergency, CMS has expanded the accelerated payment program to provide necessary funds to eligible providers/suppliers who submit a request to their Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC) and meet the required qualifications.

Eligibility requirements―Providers/suppliers who:

  1. Have billed Medicare for claims within 180 days immediately prior to the date of signature on the provider’s/supplier’s request form,
  2. Are not in bankruptcy,
  3. Are not under active medical review or program integrity investigation, and
  4. Do not have any outstanding delinquent Medicare overpayments.

Amount of payment:
Eligible providers/suppliers will request a specific amount for an accelerated payment. Most providers can request up to 100% of the Medicare payment amount for a three-month period. Inpatient acute care hospitals and certain other hospitals can request up to 100% of the Medicare payment amount for a six-month period. Critical access hospitals (CAHs) can request up to 125% of the Medicare payment for a six-month period.

Processing time:
CMS has indicated that MACs will work to review and issue payment within seven calendar days of receiving the request.

Repayment, recoupment, and reconciliation:
Repayment of the accelerated payment begins 120 days after the date of the issuance of the payment.

  • Inpatient acute care hospitals, certain other hospitals, and CAHs have up to one year from the payment date to repay the balance.
  • All other Part A providers and Part B suppliers will have 210 days from the payment date to repay the balance.
  • Providers/suppliers should continue to submit claims as usual after the issuance of the accelerated payment, but recoupment will not begin for 120 days. Full payment will be made on claims during the 120-day period. At the end of the 120-day period, the recoupment process automatically begins. Every claim submitted will be offset from the new claims to repay the accelerated payment. No payment will be made on newly submitted claims and repayment will begin.
  • The majority of hospitals will have up to one year from the date of the accelerated payment to repay the balance. One year after the accelerated payment is made, the MAC will check to determine if there is a remaining balance. If there is an un-recouped balance, the MAC will send a request for repayment which is to be made by direct payment. Part A and Part B providers not subject to the one-year recoupment plan will have up to 210 days for the reconciliation process to begin.
  • For Part A providers who receive Periodic Interim Payments, the accelerated payment reconciliation process will happen at the final cost report process (180 days after the fiscal period closes).

Application:
The MAC for Jurisdiction 6 and Jurisdiction K is NGS (National Government Services). The NGS application for accelerated payment can be found here.

The NGS Hotline telephone number is 1.888.802.3898. Per NGSMedicare.com, representatives are available Monday through Friday during regular business hours.

The MAC will review the application to ensure the eligibility requirements are met. The provider/supplier will be notified of approval or denial by mail or email. If the request is approved, the MAC will issue the accelerated payment within seven calendar days from the request.

Tips for filing the Request for Accelerated/Advance Payment:
The key to determining whether a provider should apply under Part A or Part B is the Medicare Identification number. For hospitals, the majority of funding would originate under Part A based on the CMS Certification Number (CCN) also known as the Provider Transaction Access Number (PTAN). As an example, Maine hospitals have CCN / PTAN numbers that use the following numbering convention "20-XXXX". Part B requests would originate when the provider differs from this convention. In short, everything reported on a cost report or Provider Statistical and Reimbursement report  (PS&R) would fall under Part A for the purpose of this funding. 
 
When funding is approved, the requested amount is compared to a database with amounts calculated by Medicare and provides funding at the lessor of the two amounts. The current form allows the provider to request the maximum payment amount as calculated by CMS or a lesser specified amount.
 
A representative from National Government Services indicated the preference was to receive one request for Part A per hospital. The form provides for attachment of a listing of multiple PTAN and NPI numbers that fall under the organization.

Interest after recoupment period:
On Monday, April 6, 2020, the American Hospital Association (AHA) wrote a letter to the Department of Health and Human Services and CMS requesting the interest rate applied to the repayment of the accelerated/advanced payments be waived or substantially reduced. AHA received clarification from CMS that any remaining balance at the end of the recoupment period is subject to interest. Currently that interest rate is set at 10.25% or the “prevailing rate set by the Treasury Department”. Without relief from CMS, interest will accrue as of the 31st day after the hospital has received a demand letter for the repayment of the remaining balance. The hospital does have 30 days to pay the balance without incurring interest.  

We are here to help
If you have questions or need more information about your specific situation, please contact the hospital consulting team. We’re here to help.

Article
Medicare Accelerated Payment Program

CARES Act update:

As anticipated, the House of Representatives approved the CARES Act on March 27, 2020, and the President has signed the measure. The provisions highlighted in our prior summary remain intact in the final measure. 

So…how are the emergency relief funds in the legislation accessed by healthcare providers?

  • Public Health & Social Services Emergency Fund (PHSSEF): The guidance on how hospitals will access the $100 billion in PHSSEF funds to offset “COVID-19 related expenses and lost revenue” is expected to be released shortly. Keep an eye on this space for further updates as information becomes available.
  • Medicare Advanced Lump Sum or Periodic Interim Payments: Application is made through the Fiscal Intermediary (FI). It should be noted that healthcare organizations do not qualify if they are in bankruptcy, under active medical review or program integrity investigation, or have outstanding, delinquent Medicare overpayments.
  • SBA Paycheck Protection Program (PPP): This application process begins with your local lender. Do not hesitate—contact your lender immediately as it is anticipated that application volume will be tremendous. For more specifics on this program compiled by BerryDunn experts, visit our blog.

We will continue to provide updates as more information becomes available. In the meantime, please feel free to contact the hospital consulting team. Despite the current circumstances we remain available to support your needs. 


On March 25, 2020 the US Senate unanimously approved the $2 trillion Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act (The “Act”). The White House has signaled that it will sign the measure as approved by the Senate. 

Major provisions of the proposed legislation include:

  • $100 billion for hospital “COVID-19 related expenses and lost revenue”
  • $275 million for rural hospitals, telehealth, poison control centers, and HIV/AIDS programs
  • $250 million for hospital capacity expansion and response
  • $150 million for modifications of existing hospital, nursing home, and “domiciliary facilities” undertaken as part of COVID-19 response

The CARES Act also includes the following targeted relief and payment modifications under the Medicare and Medicaid programs:

  • The Medicare 2% sequester will be suspended from May 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020. 
  • “Through the duration of the COVID-19 emergency period”, the Act will increase by 20% hospital payments for the treatment of patients admitted with COVID-19. The add-on applies to hospitals paid through the Inpatient Prospective Payment System.
  • $4 billion in scheduled cuts to Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital payments will be further delayed from May 22, 2020 to November 30, 2020.
  • Certain hospitals, including those designated as rural or frontier, have the option to request up to a six month advanced lump sum or periodic interim payments from Medicare. The payments will:
    1. Be based upon net payments represented by unbilled discharges or unpaid bills,
    2. Equal up to 100% of prior period payments, 125% for Critical Access Hospitals
    3. In terms of paying down the “no interest loans”, hospitals will be given a four month grace period to begin making payments and at least 12 months to fully liquidate the obligation.

Non-financing provisions contained in the Act that will impact hospital operations include:

  • Providing acute care hospitals the option to transfer patients out of their facilities and into alternative care settings to "prioritize resources needed to treat COVID-19 cases." That flexibility will come through the waiver of the Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility (IRF) three-hour rule, which requires patients to need at least three hours of intensive rehabilitation at least five days per week to be admitted to an IRF.
  • Allowing Long-Term Care Hospitals (LTCH) to maintain their designation even if more than 50% of their cases are less intensive and would temporarily pause LTCH site-neutral payments.
  • Suspending scheduled Medicare payment cuts for durable medical equipment during the length of the COVID-19 emergency period, to help patients transition from hospital to home.
  • Disallow Medicare beneficiary cost-sharing payments for any COVID-19 vaccine.
  • Ensuring that uninsured individuals could receive free COVID-19 tests "and related service" through any state Medicaid program that elects to enroll them.

Other emergency-period provisions that directly affect other entities but have implications for hospitals:

  • Affording $150 billion to states, territories, and tribal governments to cover their costs for responding to the coronavirus public health emergency.
  • Physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and other professionals will be allowed to order home health services for Medicare beneficiaries, to increase "beneficiary access to care in the safety of their home."
  • Requiring HHS to clarify guidance encouraging the use of telecommunications systems, including remote patient monitoring, for home health services.
  • Allowing qualified providers to use telehealth technologies to fulfill the hospice face-to-face recertification requirement.
  • Eliminating the requirement that a nephrologist conduct some of the required periodic evaluations of a home-dialysis patient face-to-face.
  • Allowing federally qualified health centers and rural health clinics to serve as a distant site for telehealth consultations.
  • Eliminating the telehealth requirement that physicians or other professionals have treated a patient in the past three years.
  • Allowing high-deductible health plans with a health savings account (HSA) to cover telehealth services before a patient reaches the deductible.
  • Allowing patients to use HSA and flexible spending accounts to buy over-the-counter medical products without a prescription.

For more information
If you have questions or need more information about your specific situation, please contact the hospital consulting team. We’re here to help. 
 

Article
CARES Act provides hospitals with emergency funding and policy wins