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CECL: Understand the audit requirements and prepare for what's to come

05.06.20

Read this if you are a CFO, CEO, COO, or CLO at a financial institution.

The preparation of financial statements by financial institutions involves a number of accounting estimates, some of which can be quite complex. As these estimates are often a significant focus of audits of those financial statements, financial institution personnel affected by the audit process might benefit from a discussion of the rules auditors need to follow when auditing estimates.

Accounting estimates

Across all industries, there are financial statement items that require a degree of estimation because they cannot be measured precisely. These amounts, called accounting estimates, are determined using a wide array of information available to management. In using such information to arrive at the estimates, a degree of estimation uncertainty exists, which has a direct effect on the risks of material misstatement of the resulting accounting estimates. For financial institutions, common examples of accounting estimates include the allowance for loan losses, valuation of investment securities, allocation of the purchase price in a bank or branch acquisition, and depreciation and amortization of premises and equipment, in addition to intangibles and goodwill. 

For entities other than public companies, the auditing rules are established by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants’ Auditing Standards Board (ASB). Under these requirements a financial statement auditor has a responsibility to assess the risks of material misstatement for accounting estimates by obtaining an understanding of the following items: 

  • The requirements of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) relevant to accounting estimates, including related disclosures. 
  • How management identifies those transactions, events, and conditions that may give rise to the need for accounting estimates to be recognized or disclosed in the financial statements. In obtaining this understanding, the auditor should make inquiries of management about changes in circumstances that may give rise to new, or the need to revise existing, accounting estimates. 
  • How management makes the accounting estimates and the data on which they are based. 

This final item—determining how management has calculated the accounting estimate in question—includes the following specific aspects for the auditor to address:

  • the method(s), including, when applicable, the model, used in making the accounting estimate; 
  • relevant controls; 
  • whether management has used a specialist; 
  • the assumptions underlying the accounting estimates; 
  • whether there has been or ought to have been a change from the prior period in the method(s) or assumption(s) for making the accounting estimates, and if so, why; and 
  • if so, how management has assessed the effects of estimation uncertainty. 

Professional skepticism

When analyzing management’s assessment of the effects of estimation uncertainty, the auditor needs to apply professional skepticism to the accounting estimate by considering whether management considered alternative assumptions, and, if a range of assumptions was reasonable, how they determined the amount chosen was the most appropriate. If estimation uncertainty is determined to be high, this is one indicator to the auditor that estimation uncertainty may pose a significant risk of material misstatement. An identified significant risk requires the auditor to perform a test of controls and/or details during the audit; in other words, analytical procedures and testing performed in previous audits will not suffice. 

CECL considerations

For audits of financial institutions, including those that have implemented the FASB CECL standard as well as those still using the incurred loss method, the allowance for loan losses will likely be deemed a significant risk due to its materiality, estimation uncertainty, complexity, and sensitivity from a user’s perspective.   

Additional factors the auditor needs to consider include whether management performed a sensitivity analysis as part of its consideration of estimation uncertainty as described above, and whether management performed a lookback analysis to evaluate the previous process used. Auditors of accounting estimates are required to do at least a high-level lookback analysis to gain an understanding of any differences between previous estimates and actual results, and to assess the reliability of management’s process. 

Auditing estimate procedures

Procedures for auditing estimates include an evaluation of subsequent events, tests of management’s methodology, tests of controls, and, in some instances, preparation of an independent estimate by the auditor. Tests of management’s method and tests of controls, including auditing the design and implementation of controls, are the most practical and likely procedures to apply to audits of the allowance for loan losses at financial institutions, both under the current guidance and following adoption of the current expected credit loss (CECL) method under Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-13, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments. As FASB has not prescribed a specific model, auditors must be prepared to tailor their procedures to address the facts and circumstances in place at each respective financial institution. 

In addition to auditing management’s estimate, auditors have the responsibility to audit related disclosures, including information about management’s methods and the model used, assumptions used in developing the estimate, and any other disclosures required by GAAP or necessary for a fair presentation of the financial statements. Throughout the audit process, auditors need to continue to exercise professional skepticism to consider what could have gone wrong during management’s process and to assess indicators of management bias, if any. 

For public companies, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) specifies auditors must evaluate both evidence that corroborates and evidence that contradicts management’s financial statement assertions in order to avoid confirmation bias. When considering the assessment of risks, as risk increases, the level of evidence obtained by the auditor should increase. As with audits of private companies, the auditor needs to consider whether the data is accurate, complete, and sufficiently precise and detailed to be used as audit evidence.

An added consideration under PCAOB rules is that the auditor is typically opining on the institution’s internal controls as well as its financial statements. This may restrict the results of control testing performed by parties independent of the function being tested from being used as audit evidence from a financial statement audit perspective. For financial institutions, this is often the case with independent loan review, since the loan review is considered part of the institution’s internal control upon which the auditor is opining. 

Supporting evidence

As with the incurred loss method, PCAOB auditing standards will require the auditor consider how much evidence is necessary to support the allowance for loan losses under CECL. All significant components of management’s allowance for loan losses estimate, including qualitative factors, will need to be supported by institution-specific data. If such data is unavailable (for example, because the institution introduces a new type of loan offering), the FASB standard indicates appropriate peer data may be acceptable. In such cases, management and the auditor may need to understand the controls in place at the vendor providing the peer data to determine its reliability. You may provide this information in the form of System and Organization Controls (commonly know as SOC1) reports of the vendor’s system.  

Recently, the International Auditing and Assurance Standards Board revised its auditing rules for estimates, with a goal of enhancing guidance regarding application of the basic audit risk model in the context of auditing estimates. The revised rules require that auditors must separately assess inherent and control risk when obtaining an understanding of controls, identifying and assessing risks, and designing and performing further audit procedures. The ASB seeks convergence of rules both internationally and domestically, and has therefore proposed changes to its requirements for auditing estimates to align with the IAASB revised rules. The ASB’s proposal on these changes indicated they would be effective beginning with audits of fiscal year ending December 31, 2022; the final effective date will be determined in conjunction with its issuance of the final rules.

The best CECL approach 

The best approach to take? Management should discuss planned changes to estimate the process with your auditors to get their perspective on best practices under CECL. Key areas to review in the discussion include documenting the decision-making process, key players involved, and the resulting review and approval process (especially for changes to methods or assumptions). Always retain copies of your final documentation for auditor review. If you would like more information, or have a specific question about your situation, please contact the team. We’re here to help. 

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Leah is a Senior Auditor in BerryDunn’s Financial Services Group and is involved in audit and accounting engagements for financial service providers and employee benefit plans. Leah helps financial service provider clients with a variety of issues including implementing new or complex accounting standards, best practice guidance, and financial statement reporting.

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Leah Clair

Read this if you are a home health agency (HHA).

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed rule, CY2021, was published on June 30, 2020. The proposed rule indicates that the Request for Advance Payment (RAP) currently permitted will be eliminated for all 30-day home health periods beginning on or after January 1, 2021. If adopted, this proposed rule will impact the timing of cash flow for HHAs. HHAs will no longer receive an advanced payment, but rather will not be paid until approximately 45-60 days after the period of care has begun. The change in timing of the payment should be considered as part of your HHA’s cash flow forecasting.

Note: Although the RAP payment has been eliminated, HHAs will still be required to submit a zero dollar RAP bill at the beginning of each 30-day period to establish home health services. 

Also included in the proposed rule is a transition from a RAP to a Notice of Admission (NOA) in 2022. This is similar to the Notice of Election under the hospice benefit, since there will no longer be a RAP. It is proposed that HHAs would submit a one-time NOA that establishes care in place of the RAP for the patient until discharged. 

There will be a payment penalty if either the zero dollar RAP in CY2021 or NOA in 2022 is not submitted within five calendar days from the start of care. The penalty is proposed to be a payment reduction of 1/13th to the wage and case-mix adjusted 30-day period of care reimbursement for each day late until submitted, reducing the total reimbursement for patient care. HHAs should be monitoring the timeliness of RAP submissions to be prepared for this proposed change and avoid potential reimbursement reduction if this proposed rule is passed. Read the entire proposed rule.

Please contact a BerryDunn Home Health team member to assist you with evaluating the cash flow impact these proposed changes may have to your organization. 

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Medicare Home Health Notice of Admission Proposed Rule CY2021 and its cash flow impact

Read this if you are a Maine business or organization that has been affected by COVID-19. 

The State of Maine has released a $200 million Maine Economic Recovery Grant Program for companies and organizations affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Here is a brief outline of the program from the state, and a list of eligibility requirements. 

“The State of Maine plans to use CARES Act relief funding to help our economy recover from the impacts of the global pandemic by supporting Maine-based businesses and non-profit organizations through an Economic Recovery Grant Program. The funding originates from the federal Coronavirus Relief Fund and will be awarded in the form of grants to directly alleviate the disruption of operations suffered by Maine’s small businesses and non-profits as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Maine Department of Economic & Community Development has been working closely with affected Maine organizations since the beginning of this crisis and has gathered feedback from all sectors on the current challenges.”

Eligibility requirements for the program from the state

To qualify for a Maine Economic Recovery Grant your business/organization must: 

  • Demonstrate a need for financial relief based on lost revenues minus expenses incurred since March 1, 2020 due to COVID-19 impacts or related public health response; 
  • Employ a combined total of 50 or fewer employees and contract employees;
  • Have significant operations in Maine (business/organization headquartered in Maine or have a minimum of 50% of employees and contract employees based in Maine); 
  • Have been in operation for at least one year before August 1, 2020; 
  • Be in good standing with the Maine Department of Labor; 
  • Be current and in good standing with all Maine state payroll taxes, sales taxes, and state income taxes (as applicable) through July 31, 2020;
  • Not be in bankruptcy; 
  • Not have permanently ceased all operations; 
  • Be in consistent compliance and not be under any current or past enforcement action with COVID-19 Prevention Checklist Requirements; and 
  • Be a for-profit business or non-profit organization, except
    • Professional services 
    • 501(c)(4), 501(c)(6) organizations that lobby 
    • K-12 schools, including charter, public and private
    • Municipalities, municipal subdivisions, and other government agencies 
    • Assisted living and retirement communities 
    • Nursing homes
    • Foundations and charitable trusts 
    • Trade associations 
    • Credit unions
    • Insurance trusts
    • Scholarship funds and programs 
    • Gambling 
    • Adult entertainment 
    • Country clubs, golf clubs, other private clubs 
    • Cemetery trusts and associations 
    • Fraternal orders 
    • Hospitals, nursing facilities, institutions of higher education, and child care organizations (Alternate funding available through the Department of Education and Department of Health and Human Services for hospitals, nursing facilities, child care organizations, and institutions of higher education.)

For more information

If you feel you qualify, you can find more details and the application here. If you have questions about your eligibility, please contact us. We’re here to help. 

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$200 Million Maine Economic Recovery Grant Program released

Read this if you are an engineering or architecture firm working with government agencies reimbursing overhead established in an overhead rate schedule based on direct labor.

It seems everyone is both anxious to gain forgiveness of their PPP loans and worried about the ramifications of requesting and being granted forgiveness. There is so much you need to consider to understand the potential impact forgiveness may have on your future cash flow and revenues. Let’s focus, though, on your overhead rate.

Some things to consider:

  • PPP loan forgiveness may significantly reduce your overhead rate. As a result, future contracts and related revenues from federal, state, or local government agencies will be impacted. 

    Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) 31.201-5 dictates that the applicable portion of any income, rebate, allowance, or other credit relating to any allowable cost and received by the contractor shall be credited to the government. If the credit will be used to reduce the indirect labor costs and rent, some of the largest costs of A/E firms, the overhead rate might be reduced by as much as 25% to 30%. 
  • Guidance on the timing of credit offset is still unclear.

    Do you offset 2020 expenses for forgiveness not settled until 2021 to better match cash flows and credit expenses relevant to forgiveness? Or reflect the forgiveness in the Schedule during the period forgiveness was formally received?
  • The IRS is currently communicating that the costs incurred to gain PPP loan forgiveness will not be deductible expenses, thus increasing 2020 taxable income.

    If your company is in a taxable position, federal income taxes will increase as a result and impact cash flows. And remember, federal income taxes are unallowable costs in overhead rate schedules under FAR Part 31.201-41.

Depending on the concentration of your contracts with federal agencies, the significance of overhead rate reimbursement on contract revenues and expectations for growth, it may actually be more beneficial to pay the loan back instead of asking for forgiveness.

The Department of Defense (DOD) weighs in:

Often the first agency to establish policy or make changes, the DOD has issued guidance in the form of answers to FAQs about CARES Act impacts on DOD pricing and contracting. Q23 specifically addresses the issue of PPP loan forgiveness. It states, “to the extent that PPP credits are allocable to costs allowable under contract, the Government should receive a credit or a reduction in billing for any PPP loans or loan payments that are forgiven.” You can read that and other CARES Act credit guidance here. Even if you don’t directly work with DoD, other federal agencies and state DOT’s generally adopt DoD’s guidance. 

What if we apply forgiveness credit against direct labor? 

You might wonder, why not just apply the credit against direct and indirect labor in proportion to the actual payroll paid during the PPP loan covered period? If this was possible, the overhead rate might actually increase. Unfortunately, billing the government for direct labor costs offset on the overhead rate schedule with the credit of PPP loan forgiveness would violate FAR Part 31 cost principles. Since you can’t bill for credited costs, revenues for contracts with government agencies would be further reduced. 

We advise a wait and see approach.

The best action plan to do right now is to wait for better and clearer guidance. Industry associations such as ACEC are advocating for more favorable PPP loan forgiveness treatment. Furthermore, there are still quite a few unanswered questions by the SBA. 

If you have any questions related to your overhead rate and the impact of PPP loan forgiveness on your revenue from contracts with government agencies, please contact us. We’re here to help. 


 

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PPP loan forgiveness will likely impact your overhead rate!

Read this if your company is seeking assistance under the PPP.

The rules surrounding PPP continue to rapidly evolve. As of June 22, 2020, we are anticipating some additional clarifications in the form of an interim final rule (or IFR) and additional answers to frequently asked questions (FAQ). The FAQs were last updated on May 27, 2020. For the latest information, please be sure to check our website or the Treasury website.

A few important changes:

  1. The loan forgiveness application, and instructions, have been updated.
  2. There is a new EZ form, designed to streamline the forgiveness process, if borrowers meet certain criteria.
  3. Changes now allow for businesses to use 60% of the PPP loan proceeds on payroll costs, down from 75%.
  4. Businesses now have 24 weeks to use the loan proceeds, rather than the original eight-week period (or by December 31, 2020, whichever comes earlier).
  5. The rules around what is a full-time equivalent (FTE) employee and the safe harbors with respect to employment levels and forgiveness have been clarified.
  6. Entities can defer payroll taxes through the ERC program, even if forgiveness is granted.

These changes are designed to make it easier to qualify for loan forgiveness. In the event you do not qualify for loan forgiveness, you may be able to extend the loan to five years, as opposed to the original two years.

The relaxation on FTE reductions is significant. The reductions will NOT count against you when calculating forgiveness, even if you haven’t restored the same employment level, if you can document that:

  • you offered employment to people and they refused to come back, or
  • HHS, CDC, OSHA or other government intervention causes an inability to “return to the same level of business activity” as of 2/15/2020.

As of June 20, 2020, there was still an additional $128 billion in available funds. The program is intended to fund new loans through June 30, 2020. 

We’re here to help.
If you have questions about the PPP, contact a BerryDunn professional.

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PPP loan forgiveness: Updates

Read this if your organization, business, or institution has leases and you’ve been eagerly awaiting and planning for the implementation of the new lease standards.

Ready? Set? Not yet. As we have prepared for and experienced delays related to Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Codification Topic 842, Leases, and Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 87, Leases, we thought the time had finally come for implementation. With the challenges that COVID-19 has brought to everyone, the FASB and GASB recognize the significant impact COVID-19 has had on commercial businesses, state and local governments, and not-for-profits and both have proposed delays in effective dates for various accounting standards, including both lease standards.

But wait, there’s more! In response to feedback FASB received during the comment period for the lease standard, the revenue recognition standard has also been extended. We didn’t see that coming, and expect that many organizations that didn’t opt for early adoption will breathe a collective sigh of relief.

FASB details and a deeper dive

On May 20, 2020, FASB voted to delay the effective date of the lease standard and the revenue recognition standard. A formal Accounting Standards Update (ASU) summarizing these changes will be released early June. Here’s what we know now:

  • Revenue recognition―for entities that have not yet issued financial statements, the effective date of the application of FASB Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 606, Revenue Recognition, has been delayed by 12 months (effective for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019). This does not apply to public entities or nonpublic entities that are conduit debt obligors who previously adopted this guidance.
  • Leases―for entities that have not yet adopted the guidance from ASC 842, Leases, the effective date has been extended by 12 months (effective for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2021).
  • Early adoption of either standard is still allowed.

FASB has also provided clarity on lease concessions that are highlighted in Topic 842. 

We recognize many lessors are making concessions due to the pandemic. Under current guidance in Topics 840 and 842, changes to lease contracts that were not included in the original lease are generally accounted for as lease modifications and, therefore, a separate contract. This would require remeasurement of the new lease contract and related right-of-use asset. 

FASB recognized this issue and has published a FASB Staff Questions and Answers (Q&A) Document, Topic 842 and Topic 840: Accounting for Lease Concessions Related to the Effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic. Under this new guidance, if lease concessions are made relating to COVID-19, entities do not need to analyze each contract to determine if a new contract has been entered into, and will have the option to apply, or not to apply, the lease modification provisions of Topics 840 and 842.

GASB details

On May 8, 2020, GASB issued Statement No. 95, Postponement of the Effective Dates of Certain Authoritative Guidance. GASB 95 extends the implementation dates of several pronouncements including:
•    Statement No. 84, Fiduciary Activities―extended by 12 months (effective for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019)
•    Statement No. 87, Leases―extended by 18 months (effective for reporting periods beginning after June 15, 2021)

More information

If you have questions, please contact a member of our financial statement audit team. For other COVID-19 related resources, please refer to BerryDunn’s COVID-19 Resources Page.
 

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May 2020 accounting standard delay status: GASB and FASB

Read this if your organization is required to perform physician time studies.

Currently hospitals allocate physician compensation costs to Part A (provider) and Part B (professional/patient) time based on either time studies or allocation agreements. The basic instructions for periodic time studies are that they must be based on the following criteria:

  1. One full week per month of the cost reporting period
  2. Based on a full work week
  3. Use three weeks from the first week of the month, three weeks from the second week of the month, three weeks from the third week of the month and three weeks from the fourth week of the month
  4. Consecutive months cannot use the same week of the month

Per a CMS Special Edition of mlnconnects published May 15, 2020, during the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency (PHE) CMS has made the following time study options available to hospitals as follows:

  • A one-week time study every six months (two weeks per year);
  • Time studies completed prior to January 27, 2020 (the PHE effective date) for the applicable cost report period can be used with no time studies needed for 1/27/2020 – 6/30/2020; or
  • Time studies for the same period in CY 2019 (e.g., if unable to complete time studies during February through July 2020, use time studies completed February through July 2019)

If you have any questions regarding the information in this article please contact Ellen Donahue.

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Physician Time Studies during the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency

Read this if you are in administration at a college or university.

Colleges and universities have been working around the clock to convert their in-person academic programming to online learning and to quickly disburse grant funding to students in line with broad eligibility requirements, all while adjusting to their own new work environments. In the search for funding in a time when many institutions are refunding student payments at unexpected and unprecedented levels, many institutions have found themselves ineligible for the Payroll Protection Program (PPP) offered under the CARES Act if the federal work study students were included in the employee count. In a welcome change, a recent interim final rule issued by the US Small Business Administration (SBA) has been released that will change the eligibility criteria for the emergency relief offered under the PPP. One of the most notable changes in the interim rule will allow colleges and universities to exclude federal work study students in determining their eligibility. 

Student workers have historically counted as employees under SBA programs. This temporary change would provide relief for many small institutions, whose federal work study programs would otherwise drive up their employment pool over the 500 employee threshold and exclude them from participation in the PPP. While federal work study positions fill important roles throughout many campus facilities, this interim final rule recognizes the primary function of a federal work study program is to provide financial aid for students attending school and is incidental to the role of the student on campus. As expected, as these positions are mostly federally funded, the interim final rule excludes these expenditures in determining the available loan amount under the PPP.

These changes are consistent with other areas of existing federal law, as noted in the interim final rule, these workers are already generally exempt from other federal employment requirements, like Federal Unemployment taxes. In order to allow for swift action, the interim final rule is effective immediately upon posting to the federal register.

We’re here to help.
For more information, or if you have questions about your specific situation, please contact the higher education consulting team.

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Federal Work-Study (FWS) excluded from PPP eligibility determination