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CECL: Understand the audit requirements and prepare for what's to come

05.06.20

Read this if you are a CFO, CEO, COO, or CLO at a financial institution.

The preparation of financial statements by financial institutions involves a number of accounting estimates, some of which can be quite complex. As these estimates are often a significant focus of audits of those financial statements, financial institution personnel affected by the audit process might benefit from a discussion of the rules auditors need to follow when auditing estimates.

Accounting estimates

Across all industries, there are financial statement items that require a degree of estimation because they cannot be measured precisely. These amounts, called accounting estimates, are determined using a wide array of information available to management. In using such information to arrive at the estimates, a degree of estimation uncertainty exists, which has a direct effect on the risks of material misstatement of the resulting accounting estimates. For financial institutions, common examples of accounting estimates include the allowance for loan losses, valuation of investment securities, allocation of the purchase price in a bank or branch acquisition, and depreciation and amortization of premises and equipment, in addition to intangibles and goodwill. 

For entities other than public companies, the auditing rules are established by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants’ Auditing Standards Board (ASB). Under these requirements a financial statement auditor has a responsibility to assess the risks of material misstatement for accounting estimates by obtaining an understanding of the following items: 

  • The requirements of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) relevant to accounting estimates, including related disclosures. 
  • How management identifies those transactions, events, and conditions that may give rise to the need for accounting estimates to be recognized or disclosed in the financial statements. In obtaining this understanding, the auditor should make inquiries of management about changes in circumstances that may give rise to new, or the need to revise existing, accounting estimates. 
  • How management makes the accounting estimates and the data on which they are based. 

This final item—determining how management has calculated the accounting estimate in question—includes the following specific aspects for the auditor to address:

  • the method(s), including, when applicable, the model, used in making the accounting estimate; 
  • relevant controls; 
  • whether management has used a specialist; 
  • the assumptions underlying the accounting estimates; 
  • whether there has been or ought to have been a change from the prior period in the method(s) or assumption(s) for making the accounting estimates, and if so, why; and 
  • if so, how management has assessed the effects of estimation uncertainty. 

Professional skepticism

When analyzing management’s assessment of the effects of estimation uncertainty, the auditor needs to apply professional skepticism to the accounting estimate by considering whether management considered alternative assumptions, and, if a range of assumptions was reasonable, how they determined the amount chosen was the most appropriate. If estimation uncertainty is determined to be high, this is one indicator to the auditor that estimation uncertainty may pose a significant risk of material misstatement. An identified significant risk requires the auditor to perform a test of controls and/or details during the audit; in other words, analytical procedures and testing performed in previous audits will not suffice. 

CECL considerations

For audits of financial institutions, including those that have implemented the FASB CECL standard as well as those still using the incurred loss method, the allowance for loan losses will likely be deemed a significant risk due to its materiality, estimation uncertainty, complexity, and sensitivity from a user’s perspective.   

Additional factors the auditor needs to consider include whether management performed a sensitivity analysis as part of its consideration of estimation uncertainty as described above, and whether management performed a lookback analysis to evaluate the previous process used. Auditors of accounting estimates are required to do at least a high-level lookback analysis to gain an understanding of any differences between previous estimates and actual results, and to assess the reliability of management’s process. 

Auditing estimate procedures

Procedures for auditing estimates include an evaluation of subsequent events, tests of management’s methodology, tests of controls, and, in some instances, preparation of an independent estimate by the auditor. Tests of management’s method and tests of controls, including auditing the design and implementation of controls, are the most practical and likely procedures to apply to audits of the allowance for loan losses at financial institutions, both under the current guidance and following adoption of the current expected credit loss (CECL) method under Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-13, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments. As FASB has not prescribed a specific model, auditors must be prepared to tailor their procedures to address the facts and circumstances in place at each respective financial institution. 

In addition to auditing management’s estimate, auditors have the responsibility to audit related disclosures, including information about management’s methods and the model used, assumptions used in developing the estimate, and any other disclosures required by GAAP or necessary for a fair presentation of the financial statements. Throughout the audit process, auditors need to continue to exercise professional skepticism to consider what could have gone wrong during management’s process and to assess indicators of management bias, if any. 

For public companies, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) specifies auditors must evaluate both evidence that corroborates and evidence that contradicts management’s financial statement assertions in order to avoid confirmation bias. When considering the assessment of risks, as risk increases, the level of evidence obtained by the auditor should increase. As with audits of private companies, the auditor needs to consider whether the data is accurate, complete, and sufficiently precise and detailed to be used as audit evidence.

An added consideration under PCAOB rules is that the auditor is typically opining on the institution’s internal controls as well as its financial statements. This may restrict the results of control testing performed by parties independent of the function being tested from being used as audit evidence from a financial statement audit perspective. For financial institutions, this is often the case with independent loan review, since the loan review is considered part of the institution’s internal control upon which the auditor is opining. 

Supporting evidence

As with the incurred loss method, PCAOB auditing standards will require the auditor consider how much evidence is necessary to support the allowance for loan losses under CECL. All significant components of management’s allowance for loan losses estimate, including qualitative factors, will need to be supported by institution-specific data. If such data is unavailable (for example, because the institution introduces a new type of loan offering), the FASB standard indicates appropriate peer data may be acceptable. In such cases, management and the auditor may need to understand the controls in place at the vendor providing the peer data to determine its reliability. You may provide this information in the form of System and Organization Controls (commonly know as SOC1) reports of the vendor’s system.  

Recently, the International Auditing and Assurance Standards Board revised its auditing rules for estimates, with a goal of enhancing guidance regarding application of the basic audit risk model in the context of auditing estimates. The revised rules require that auditors must separately assess inherent and control risk when obtaining an understanding of controls, identifying and assessing risks, and designing and performing further audit procedures. The ASB seeks convergence of rules both internationally and domestically, and has therefore proposed changes to its requirements for auditing estimates to align with the IAASB revised rules. The ASB’s proposal on these changes indicated they would be effective beginning with audits of fiscal year ending December 31, 2022; the final effective date will be determined in conjunction with its issuance of the final rules.

The best CECL approach 

The best approach to take? Management should discuss planned changes to estimate the process with your auditors to get their perspective on best practices under CECL. Key areas to review in the discussion include documenting the decision-making process, key players involved, and the resulting review and approval process (especially for changes to methods or assumptions). Always retain copies of your final documentation for auditor review. If you would like more information, or have a specific question about your situation, please contact the team. We’re here to help. 

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Leah is a Senior Auditor in BerryDunn’s Financial Services Group and is involved in audit and accounting engagements for financial service providers and employee benefit plans. Leah helps financial service provider clients with a variety of issues including implementing new or complex accounting standards, best practice guidance, and financial statement reporting.

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Leah Clair

Read this if you file taxes with the IRS for yourself or other individuals.

To protect yourself from identity thieves filing fraudulent tax returns in your name, the IRS recommends using Identity Protection PINs. Available to anyone who can verify their identity online, by phone, or in person, these PINs provide extra security against tax fraud related to stolen social security numbers of Tax ID numbers.

According to the Security Summit—a group of experts from the IRS, state tax agencies, and the US tax industry—the IP PIN is the number one security tool currently available to taxpayers from the IRS.

The simplest way to obtain a PIN is on the IRS website’s Get an IP PIN page. There, you can create an account or log in to your existing IRS account and verify your identity by uploading an identity document such as a driver’s license, state ID, or passport. Then, you must take a “selfie” with your phone or your computer’s webcam as the final step in the verification process.

Important things to know about the IRS IP PIN:

  • You must set up the IP PIN yourself; your tax professional cannot set one up on your behalf.
  • Once set up, you should only share the PIN with your trusted tax prep provider.
  • The IP PIN is valid for one calendar year; you must obtain a new IP PIN each year.
  • The IRS will never call, email or text a request for the IP PIN.
  • The 6-digit IP PIN should be entered onto your electronic tax return when prompted by the software product or onto a paper return next to the signature line.

If you cannot verify your identity online, you have options:

  • Taxpayers with an income of $72,000 or less who are unable to verify their identity online can obtain an IP PIN for the next filing season by filing Form 15227. The IRS will validate the taxpayer’s identity through a phone call.
  • Those with an income more than $72,000, or any taxpayer who cannot verify their identity online or by phone, can make an appointment at a Taxpayer Assistance Center and bring a photo ID and an additional identity document to validate their identity. They’ll then receive the IP PIN by US mail within three weeks.
  • For more information about IRS Identity Protection PINs and to get your IP PIN online, visit the IRS website.

If you have questions about your specific situation, please contact our Tax Consulting and Compliance team. We’re here to help.

Article
The IRS Identity Protection PIN: What is it and why do you need one?

Read this if you are at a financial institution with employees working remotely.

Working remotely is not a new concept. Over the past 20 years, technology enhancements have increased the ability for employees to connect remotely and perform many job functions without ever leaving their homes. When the COVID-19 pandemic began in early 2020, working remotely became a necessity for essential businesses like financial institutions to provide safe environments for both employees and customers and remain open.

One of the benefits of an increase in working from home during the pandemic is that it provided financial institutions and other businesses an opportunity to learn how to perform essential job functions and manage teams from a distance. In addition, many organizations experienced indirect benefits, including a more flexible work environment, higher job satisfaction, increased productivity, and improved employee retention. Now that employees are being asked to return to the office, many financial institutions are considering if a permanent work-from-home arrangement is possible. 

What you need to know

For starters, financial institutions need to know where their employees are providing services. Is it across state lines or across the country? What if you have two or more employees who want to work out of state—and they are all different states? What are the tax implications? Are there legal concerns?

Nexus

Nexus is the connection that taxpayers have with a state that permits the state to assess various types of taxes, including income tax. Nexus rules vary from state to state, but generally a business with nexus in a state is required to register with the Secretary of State/Department of Revenue, file tax returns, and pay various taxes to the state. 

Employees working in a "different state" (a state which income tax returns are not already being filed) may create nexus to that state for tax purposes. Even if your financial institution has only one employee working in a state and otherwise has no other connection to the state, there may be tax implications. Some states have established nexus waivers because of the pandemic, providing relief to some businesses and employees who have temporary work-from-home arrangements. These waivers, however, will soon expire or have expired already. 

The following details should be considered before offering out-of-state remote employee work arrangements.

State income tax filing requirements

  • If your financial institution has an employee working remotely from a different state, the financial institution has created physical presence nexus in that state. Once nexus has been established, the financial institution may be subject to state and local income taxes, gross receipts taxes, unique taxes specific to financial institution, or franchise taxes. When it comes to taxing a financial institution, not all states assess tax in the same manner. 
  • After nexus has been established, your financial institution will also need to understand how the state apportions wages in determining income tax liability to the state. One example is a factor approach: Total payroll paid to employees working in the state divided by total payroll paid to all employees. In a simplified example, the fraction would be multiplied by taxable income resulting in amount of taxable income in that state. One employee in a state is not likely to create a significant income tax liability to the state, however, many states have minimum tax liabilities and other fees—some more significant than others—which should also be considered along with additional administrative costs. 

State tax withholding

  • Employees will need to pay personal state income tax based on their primary state of residence as well as the state in which they work. If your financial institution's remote employee is performing most of their work from home in a different state than the financial institution, and travels to the financial institution for occasional meetings or in-person days, this could result in the employee having a personal state income tax liability in both states. It may be necessary for your financial institution to track the employee’s location and properly withhold state income taxes from the employee’s pay based on the state that the employee is providing services. 
  • Failure to properly withhold state income taxes could create a liability for both the employee and the employer including penalties and interest. Proper policies should be in place regarding the responsibility of tracking where employees are performing their work may mitigate these concerns. You should encourage your employees to work with their individual tax advisors on state tax issues as each employee's tax filing position is unique (we generally advise against providing tax advice to your employees). 

Unemployment taxes and workers’ compensation

  • Unemployment is typically paid to the state in which an employee has their permanent place of work. Your financial institution should review the state’s unemployment rules to determine if the financial institution is required to collect and remit unemployment tax to a state that it has employees. If your employee is working in a different state on a temporary basis or due to the pandemic, we believe there is no need for unemployment to change from the state where the financial institution is located.
  • Workers’ compensation is also typically paid to the state in which the employee is permanently assigned. If the out-of-state work arrangement is temporary, we do not feel you need to change your workers’ compensation. However, if the out-of-state arrangement from home becomes permanent, you may need to change your policy. Some states require employers to have a minimum number of employees in the state before requiring a workers’ compensation policy in that state. We recommend working with BerryDunn’s employee benefits experts on state rules and discussing with your insurance carrier.

Personal property and other taxes

  • Employees working from home are often provided furniture and equipment for their remote office set up. Financial institutions should consider whether they want to provide these items without retaining ownership to the property, as owning property in another state could result in the financial institution needing to file and remit personal property taxes to the state. It also would be considered a best practice to develop a policy that provides consistency among all remote employees, regardless of their location. 
  • Sales and use tax implications and other special or unique state and local taxes should be researched and understood prior to entering any state to determine the impact on existing products and services which may be offered to out of state customers who reside or relocate out of state. We will provide more information about the state tax issues related to providing services in a future installment of this state tax series. 

Other considerations

  • We recommend you discuss with your financial institution's attorney regarding the need to file a business license or update the financial institution's charter as these are legal matters. Here are some topics to consider as you have these discussions:
    • Your financial institution may be required to register with the state department of revenue/taxation
    • Registering as a foreign corporation is often necessary to access the legal system
    • Your financial institution may want to consider whether other regulatory licenses may be needed, such as insurance broker or license for trust services
  • Health insurance and other employee benefit plans should be reviewed to ensure that a remote employee eligible to receive benefits still qualifies and receives the same level of coverage that is available to in-state employees. 

In summary, even one employee working out of state could create additional compliance costs and exposure to a state’s laws and regulations. You may be wondering how risky it is to have only one employee located in a state, and how likely is it that the state would make the connection to your out-of-state financial institution.

While  the risk may seem low, states are always looking to generate additional tax revenue, and many have the ability to cross check internal systems. Withholding and remitting state income taxes on behalf of an employee is likely going to require your financial institution to register with a state's income tax withholding agency. The state will then be aware of your financial institution’s connection to its state as the financial institution’s EIN will be in the system for payroll purposes. While the exposure may still be low, the state may start looking for an income tax filing and at least payment of minimum tax. Failure to file in a state means that the statute of limitations for the financial institution’s exposure to that state will not start.

The risks shouldn’t necessarily prevent your financial institution from allowing employees to work from home, and as many financial institutions want to offer more flexible work arrangements given what has been learned in recent years, it is possible to minimize tax risk and remain compliant with proper planning and awareness. 

For more information

To discuss your specific tax situation and state compliance risks, please contact the BerryDunn Financial Services team. We’re here to help.

Article
State tax issues impacting your financial institution part one: Remote employees

Read this if you are a Chief Financial Officer or Controller at a financial institution.

Back in April, we wrote about recently released Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2022-02, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326). Here, we are going to look at the standard in more depth. 

One of the most notable items this ASU addresses, is that it eliminates the often tedious troubled debt restructuring (TDR) accounting and disclosure requirements. Accounting for loan modifications will now be maintained under extant US generally accepted accounting principles, specifically Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 310-20-35-9 through 35-11. However, rather than eliminate loan modification disclosure requirements altogether, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) created some new requirements, inspired by voluntary disclosures many financial institutions made during the coronavirus pandemic. 

Rather than disclosing information on TDRs, financial institutions will now be required to disclose information on loan modifications that were in the form of principal forgiveness, an interest rate reduction, an other-than-insignificant payment delay, or a term extension (or a combination thereof) made to debtors experiencing financial difficulty. These disclosures must be made regardless of whether a modification to a debtor experiencing financial difficulty results in a new loan or not. 

ASC 310-10-50-42 through 50-44 establishes these new disclosure requirements, and ASC 310-10-55-12A provides an example of the required disclosures. 

New Loan Modification Disclosure Requirements

Financial institutions have long had internal controls surrounding the determination of TDRs given the impact such restructurings can have on the allowance for credit losses and financial statement disclosures. Banks may find they are able to leverage those controls to satisfy the new modification disclosures, with only minor adjustments. Similar to previous TDR determinations, the above disclosures are only required for modifications to debtors experiencing financial difficulty. Therefore, financial institutions will need to have a process —or defined set of parameters—in place to determine debtor “financial difficulty”, thus triggering the need for modification disclosure. Banks may also find that the specific data gathered for preparation of these new disclosures will change, but should be readily available, with (hopefully) only minor manipulation required.

ASU No. 2022-02 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022, including interim periods within those fiscal years—the same effective date for those who have not yet adopted ASU No. 2016-13, more commonly referred to as CECL (Current Expected Credit Loss). As always, if you have any questions as to how this new ASU may impact your financial institution, please reach out to BerryDunn’s Financial Services team or submit a question via our Ask the Advisor feature.

Article
New loan modification disclosure requirements: A deeper dive

Read this if you are a depository institution.

Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) matters are all the rage right now. From new disclosures to personal, professional, investor, and social media pressures, ESG presents itself as a vast topic, encompassing many facets of an organization. It can be daunting to even know where to begin ESG efforts. 

ESG issues seem pervasive and may be best thought of as residing on a spectrum, with some industries further along this spectrum than others. However, each industry can make its own mark, with initiatives that can propel it along the ESG spectrum. Even within one industry, individual organizations may have their own initiatives and areas of focus. Equal importance does not need be given to the E, the S, and the G, and some industries may be better equipped to address one of these pillars over the others. We would like to share what we believe to be four areas of opportunity for banks as they think about ESG, their customers, and their employees.

Credit decisions

Many financial institutions currently base credit decisions on an array of financial metrics of the prospective borrower. Their reviews include financial forecasts, historical financial results, collateral values, etc., all with the intent of predicting if the prospective borrower will be able to repay the credit. Given the increasing regulatory and social pressure regarding ESG, bankers should be aware of how ESG requirements and industry initiatives could impact a borrower’s financial condition. For instance, consider the following:

  • Where does the prospective borrower reside on the ESG spectrum, collectively and individually (the separate E, the S, and the G spectrums)? 
  • If they are a carbon-intensive company, what additional risks does that pose to the relationship, if any? (E)
    • Are there pending regulations (or fines) that could significantly impact their operations?
    • Although their finances may be strong currently, are there alternative products or services that are seen as “greener” that may jeopardize future profits and cash flows?
    • If the company plans to become less carbon-intensive, either voluntarily or out of necessity, are there significant costs anticipated to be incurred during this transition?
  • Do they have, or anticipate, community investment initiatives? (S)
  • Are they viewed as a reputable company in their respective communities? (S)
  • Is there adequate Board and execute management oversight? (G)

ESG-specific products

Financial institutions can reward borrowers for their stewardship. This concept is not new, as “green bonds” have been around for years to incentivize climate and environmental projects. Some financial institutions, such as TD Bank and Barclays, offer preferred interest rates to ESG-conscious borrowers, such as those that purchase houses that meet certain energy efficiency ratings. Financial institutions could further expand on this idea and offer loans earmarked for certain ESG-related purposes, such as development of low-carbon manufacturing techniques or investment in the company’s workforce. Such products can be a great way to position your financial institution as an ESG leader in the community and assist borrowers on their ESG journey. 

Financial institutions can act as a connector for like-minded parties

Financial institutions are in a unique position, as aside from the borrower themselves, a financial institution likely knows the most about the borrower’s business. Financial institutions may become aware of customers further along their ESG journeys and could help connect those resources to other customers who may want to know and learn more. Customers are increasingly looking for more from their financial institution outside of traditional banking services. Given their unique position, financial institutions are best equipped to act as a connector for like-minded parties. 

Customers and employees may want their supply chain/employer to be ESG conscious

Customers, whether they be individuals or businesses, and employees are increasingly considering the actions of potential vendors and employers before partnering with them. Likely a result of their own ESG mission, customers are starting to realize that, even if they feel as if they are ESG conscious, it is their responsibility to also hold their vendors accountable. Therefore, customers may elect to go to another financial institution that is more ESG conscious even if your financial institution offers a better product. Employees are also factoring this into employment decisions. Employees want to feel as if they are part of a larger mission. Focusing on ESG could give your financial institution a competitive advantage.

When considering ESG matters, some believe they are faced with two mutually exclusive decisions: (1) what makes the most sense financially, and (2) what will propel our organization further along the ESG spectrum? What some leading companies have found, however, is that by focusing first on where they lie on the ESG spectrum and defining where they want to be in the future helps clarify future decision-making so that cost and ESG progress are aligned rather than opposing forces. As always, BerryDunn’s Financial Services team is here to help.

Article
Propelling along the ESG spectrum: Four considerations for your financial institution

What the C-Suite should know about CECL and change management

Read this if you are at a financial institution. 

Some institutions are managing CECL implementation as a significant enterprise project, while others have assigned it to just one or two people. While these approaches may yield technical compliance, leadership may find they fail to realize any strategic benefits. In this article, Dan Vogt, Principal in BerryDunn’s Management and IT Consulting Practice, and Susan Weber, Senior Manager and CECL expert in BerryDunn’s Financial Services Practice, outline key actions leaders can take now to ensure CECL adoption success.  

Call it empathy, or just the need to take a break from the tactical and check in on the human experience, but on a recent call, I paused the typical readiness questions to ask, “How’s the mood around CECL adoption – what’s it been like getting others in the organization involved?” The three-word reply was simple, but powerful: “Kicking and screaming.”  

Earlier this year, by a vote of 5-2, the FASB (Financial Accounting Standards Board) closed the door to any further delays to CECL adoption, citing an overarching need to unify the industry under one standard. FASB’s decision also mercifully ended the on-again off-again cycle that has characterized CECL preparation efforts since early 2020. One might think the decision would have resulted in relief. But with so much change in the world over the past few years, is it any wonder institutions are instead feeling change-saturated?  

Organizational change

CECL has been heralded as the most significant change to bank accounting ever, replacing 40+ years of accounting and regulatory oversight practices. But the new standard does much more than that. Implementing CECL has an effect on everything from executive and board strategic discussions to interdepartmental workflows, systems, and controls. The introduction of new methods, data elements, and financial assets has helped usher in new software, processes, and responsibilities that directly affect the work of many people in the organization. CECL isn’t just accounting—it’s organizational change. 

Change management

Change management best practices often focus on leading from optimism—typically leadership and an executive sponsor talk about opportunities and the business reasons for change. Some examples of what this might sound like as it relates to CECL might include, by converting to lifetime loss expectations, the institution will be better prepared to weather economic downturns; or, by evolving data and modeling precision, an institution’s understanding and measure of credit risk is enhanced, resulting in more strategic growth, pricing, and risk management. 

But leading from optimism is sometimes hard to do because it isn’t always motivating—especially when the change is mandated rather than chosen.  

Perhaps a more judiciously used tactic is to focus on the risk, or potential penalty, of not changing. In the case of CECL, examples might include, your external auditor not being able to sign-off on your financials (or significant delays in doing so), regulatory criticism, inefficient/ineffective processes, control issues, tired and frustrated staff. These examples expose the institution to all kinds of key risks: compliance, operational, strategic, and reputational, among them.

CECL success and change management

With so much riding on CECL implementation and adoption going well, some organizations may be at heightened risk simply because the effort is being compartmentalized—isolated within a department, or assigned to only one or two people. How effectively leadership connects CECL implementation with tenets of change management, how quickly they understand, then together embrace, promote, and facilitate the related changes affecting people and their work, may prove to be the key factor in achieving success beyond compliance.  

One important step leaders can take is to perform an impact assessment to understand who in the organization is being affected by the transition to CECL, and how. An example of this is below. Identifying the departments and functions that will need to be changed or updated with CECL adoption might expose critical overlaps and reveal important new or enhanced collaborations. Adding in the number of people represented by each group gives leaders insight into the extent of the impact across the institution. By better understanding how these different groups are affected, leaders can work together to more effectively prioritize, identify and remove roadblocks, and support peoples’ efforts longer term.           

 
No matter where your institution is currently in its CECL implementation journey, it is not too late to course-correct. Leadership—unified in priority, message, and understanding—can achieve the type of success that produces efficient sustainable practices, and increases employee resilience and engagement.

For more information, visit the CECL page on our website. If you would like specific answers to questions about your CECL implementation, please visit our Ask the Advisor page to submit your questions. For more tips on documenting your CECL adoption, stay tuned for our next article in the series, revisit past articles, or tune in to our CECL Radio podcast. You can also follow Susan Weber on LinkedIn.

Article
Implementing CECL: Kicking and screaming

Read this if your organization offers health insurance through a health insurance exchange.

When the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed in 2010, it contained a known gap which made healthcare premiums unaffordable for some families covered under Medicare or employer-sponsored health insurance plans. The gap in the law, commonly referred to as the family glitch, was formalized in 2013 as the result of a Final Rule issued by the IRS. 

The “family glitch” calculates the affordability of an employer-sponsored health insurance plan based on the cost for the employee, not additional family members. An article published in April 2022 on healthinsurance.org estimated that the cost of health insurance for a family covered by an employer-sponsored plan could end up being 25% or more of the household’s income, even if the plan was considered affordable (less than 9.61% of the household’s income) for the employee alone. Almost half of the people impacted by the family glitch are children.

The family glitch was allowed to stand in 2013 partly because of concerns that resolving the issue could push more people off employer-sponsored plans and onto marketplace qualified health plans, ultimately raising the cost of subsidies. Since then, several attempts have been made to fix the issue, which affects around five million Americans. The most recent attempt was an executive order issued by President Biden soon after taking office in January 2021. The Office of Management and Budget has been reviewing regulatory changes proposed by the Treasury Department and IRS, details of which were published in April 2022. 

These regulatory changes would alter the way health insurance exchanges calculate a family’s eligibility for subsidies when the family has access to an employer-sponsored health insurance plan. If the changes go into effect in 2023 as proposed, audits of the 2023 fiscal year will need to account for the new regulations and potentially conduct different testing protocols for different parts of the year. 

Our team is closely following these proposed changes to help ensure our clients are prepared to follow the new regulations. Earlier this week, we attended a public hearing held by the Treasury Department, where representatives of various groups spoke in support of, or in opposition to the proposed regulatory change. Supporters noted that families with plans that offer expensive coverage for dependents would benefit from this change through reduced costs and more coverage options, including provider networks that may more closely align with the family members’ needs. Those in favor of the change anticipate that families with children would see the most benefit. 

Those opposed to the change expressed that due to the way the law is currently written, they do not see the regulatory flexibility for the administration to make this change through administrative action. Additionally, concerns were raised that families covered by multiple health insurance plans could be faced with higher out-of-pocket-costs due to having separate deductibles that must be met on an annual basis. Lastly, not all families that have unaffordable insurance would see financial relief under this proposal. 

The Treasury Department is expected to announce its decision in time for open enrollment for plan year 2023 which is scheduled to begin on November 1, 2022. Our team will continue to monitor the situation closely and provide updates on how the changes may impact our clients. 

For more information

If you have more questions or have a specific question about your situation, please reach out to us. There is more information to consider when evaluating the effects these changes will have on the landscape of healthcare access and affordability, and we’re here to help.

Article
Fixing the "family glitch": How a proposed change to the ACA will affect healthcare subsidies 

Editor's note: read this if you are a CFO, controller, accountant, or business manager.

We auditors can be annoying, especially when we send multiple follow-up emails after being in the field for consecutive days. Over the years, we have worked with our clients to create best practices you can use to prepare for our arrival on site for year-end work. Time and time again these have proven to reduce follow-up requests and can help you and your organization get back to your day-to-day operations quickly. 

  1. Reconcile early and often to save time.
    Performing reconciliations to the general ledger for an entire year's worth of activity is a very time consuming process. Reconciling accounts on a monthly or quarterly basis will help identify potential variances or issues that need to be investigated; these potential variances and issues could be an underlying problem within the general ledger or control system that, if not addressed early, will require more time and resources at year-end. Accounts with significant activity (cash, accounts receivable, investments, fixed assets, accounts payable and accrued expenses and debt), should be reconciled on a monthly basis. Accounts with less activity (prepaids, other assets, accrued expenses, other liabilities and equity) can be reconciled on a different schedule.
  2. Scan the trial balance to avoid surprises.
    As auditors, one of the first procedures we perform is to scan the trial balance for year-over-year anomalies. This allows us to identify any significant irregularities that require immediate follow up. Does the year-over-year change make sense? Should this account be a debit balance or a credit balance? Are there any accounts with exactly the same balance as the prior year and should they have the same balance? By performing this task and answering these questions prior to year-end fieldwork, you will be able to reduce our follow up by providing explanations ahead of time or by making correcting entries in advance, if necessary. 
  3. Provide support to be proactive.
    On an annual basis, your organization may go through changes that will require you to provide us documented contractual support.  Such events may include new or a refinancing of debt, large fixed asset additions, new construction, renovations, or changes in ownership structure.  Gathering and providing the documentation for these events prior to fieldwork will help reduce auditor inquiries and will allow us to gain an understanding of the details of the transaction in advance of performing substantive audit procedures. 
  4. Utilize the schedule request to stay organized.
    Each member of your team should have a clear understanding of their role in preparing for year-end. Creating columns on the schedule request for responsibility, completion date and reviewer assigned will help maintain organization and help ensure all items are addressed and available prior to arrival of the audit team. 
  5. Be available to maximize efficiency. 
    It is important for key members of the team to be available during the scheduled time of the engagement.  Minimizing commitments outside of the audit engagement during on site fieldwork and having all year-end schedules prepared prior to our arrival will allow us to work more efficiently and effectively and help reduce follow up after fieldwork has been completed. 

Careful consideration and performance of these tasks will help your organization better prepare for the year-end audit engagement, reduce lingering auditor inquiries, and ultimately reduce the time your internal resources spend on the annual audit process. See you soon. 

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Save time and effort—our list of tips to prepare for year-end reporting

Read this if you are a community bank.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) recently issued its first quarter 2022 Quarterly Banking Profile. The report provides financial information based on Call Reports filed by 4,796 FDIC-insured commercial banks and savings institutions. The report also contains a section specific to community bank performance. In first quarter 2022, this section included the financial information of 4,353 FDIC-insured community banks. BerryDunn’s key takeaways from the report are as follows:

Community banks continue to feel the impact of shrinking net interest margins and inflation.

Community bank quarterly net income dropped to $7 billion in first quarter 2022, down $1.1 billion from a year ago. Lower net gains on loan sales and higher noninterest expenses offset growth in net interest income and lower provisions. Net income declined $581.3 million, or 7.7 percent from fourth quarter 2021 primarily because of lower noninterest income and higher noninterest expense.

Loan and lease balances continue to grow in first quarter 2022

Community banks saw a $21.5 billion increase in loan and lease balances from fourth quarter 2021. All major loan categories except commercial & industrial and agricultural production grew year over year, and 55.3 percent of community banks recorded annual loan growth. Total loan and lease balances increased $35.1 billion, or 2.1 percent, from one year ago. Excluding Paycheck Protection Program loans, annual total loan growth would have been 10.2 percent.

Community bank net interest margin (NIM) dropped to 3.11 percent due to strong earning asset growth.

Community bank NIM fell 15 basis points from the year-ago quarter and 10 basis points from fourth quarter 2021. Net interest income growth trailed the pace of earning asset growth. The yield on earning assets fell 28 basis points while the cost of funding earning assets fell 13 basis points from the year-ago quarter. The 0.24 percent average cost of funds was the lowest level on record since Quarterly Banking Profile data collection began in first quarter 1984. 

Community bank allowance for credit losses (ACL) to total loans remained higher than the pre-pandemic level at 1.28 percent, despite declining 4 basis points from the year-ago quarter.


NOTE: The above graph is for all FDIC-Insured Institutions, not just community banks.

The ACL as a percentage of loans 90 days or more past due or in nonaccrual status (coverage ratio) increased to a record high of 236.7 percent. The decline in noncurrent loan balances outpaced the decline in ACL, with the coverage ratio for community banks emerging 57.9 percentage points above the coverage ratio for noncommunity banks. 

The banking landscape continues to be one that is ever-evolving. With interest rates on the rise, banks will find their margins in flux once again. During this transition, banks should look for opportunities to increase loan growth and protect and enhance customer relationships. Inflation has also caused concern not only for banks but also for their customers. This is an opportune time for banks to work with their customers to navigate the current economic environment. Community banks, with their in-depth knowledge of their customers’ financial situations and the local economies served, are in a perfect position to build upon the trust that has already been developed with customers.

As always, please don’t hesitate to reach out to BerryDunn’s Financial Services team if you have any questions.

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FDIC issues its First Quarter 2022 Quarterly Banking Profile