Skip to Main Content

insightsarticles

Introduction to mobile driver's licenses (mDLs): What are they and why are they important?

By:

Jake is a Consultant in BerryDunn’s Justice and Public Safety Practice in the Government Consulting Group. He has worked on various justice and public safety projects including system implementations, point-in-time assessments, business process mapping, and vendor procurements. He is a Prosci®-certified Change Management Practitioner.

Jake Spaulding,

Paige is a Senior Consultant in BerryDunn’s Justice and Public Safety Practice in the Government Consulting Group. Paige works with both local and state clients in the public sector in the justice and public safety field, including departments of motor vehicles, departments of correction, and judiciaries. Her projects range from system procurement and implementation to business process improvement and independent reviews. She is a Prosci®-certified Change Management Practitioner.

Paige Streeter
01.25.21

Read this if you are a division of motor vehicles, or interested in mDLs.

What is a mobile driver’s license?

A mobile driver’s license (mDL) is a solution that allows citizens to access, update, and use their driver’s license via a smart phone or other internet-accessible device (e.g., laptop, tablet, smart watch). An mDL is a form of electronic identification (eID), but where eIDs include other forms of licensure like hunting/fishing/gaming licenses or military IDs, mDLs are used to designate driving privileges and, in some cases, to designate age-based/identity privileges for citizens who cannot drive (e.g., buying alcohol, TSA PreCheck®).

Why should you care?

Technology has replaced physical product functionality within various areas of modern life. Many people have transitioned to electronic credit/debit card payments (e.g., Apple Pay), making paying for everyday items faster, easier, and cleaner, while also introducing risks to consumer data security. Similar functionality will soon exist within the eID space, starting with mDLs. This provides challenges for departments of motor vehicles (DMVs), businesses, and consumers; however, the benefits of adopting mDL functionality outweigh the growing pains of establishing the programs.

How does it work and when will it be implemented?

The mDL will function similarly to electronic credit cards and mobile payment applications: an mDL user loads their mDL to their mobile device using a mobile application and can use it to verify their age and driving credentials at mDL-reading establishments and with law enforcement. Relevant establishments will require both hardware and software solutions to read mDLs. 

mDLs aren’t intended to replace physical licenses—at least not yet. While state and county pilot programs resolve some of the challenges associated with mDLs, physical IDs will remain required for years to come. 

Additionally, the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) created two groups—a Card Design Standard Committee and Electronic Identification Working Group—to develop interoperable standards to assist license issuing authorities (e.g., DMVs) in developing their mDL programs. These standards will ensure that mDLs work using different hardware, software, vendor applications, and within different jurisdictions. 

Benefits and challenges

Benefits

mDLs provide numerous benefits to citizens and DMVs alike, including information security, user convenience, and administrative convenience.

Information security

  • mDLs are harder to fake than physical driver’s licenses due to the mDL’s connection to back-end license data within the DMV system. 

  • mDLs allow users the option to communicate specific data to the receiving party without sharing all of the user’s license information (e.g., confirming the user is over age 21 without sharing their specific age or street address). 

User convenience

  • Users will be able to update their credentials fully online and see in-real-time updates.
  • mDLs will possess single sign-on verification and use for users via a biometric lock or PIN, making them quick to access and easy to use.

Administrative convenience

  • The decline in DMV wait times due to online-update functionality will save DMVs money in administrative costs.

Challenges

As with all technological advancement, there are several challenges around the development of mDLs. The primary challenge is ensuring the protection of user data while also rolling out the complex—and often costly—infrastructure needed to support mDL use across a region. 

Information security 

  • Issuing agencies can choose whether some, none, or all mDL user data is stored on the user’s device and must ensure all data stored this way is done so securely.

  • mDLs must ensure hands-free exchange of information with law enforcement to protect user data when presenting identification.

  • Technological errors are bound to occur: if an mDL-reading establishment is not able to read a citizen's mDL for any reason, a citizen will require a physical license to complete the transaction.

Program rollout

  • States and mDL vendors will need to support interoperable mDL standards to ensure that an mDL works with different vendor software and across jurisdictions.

  • Establishments and law enforcement will need the necessary mDL-reading hardware (smart phone, smart watch, tablet, laptop, point-of-sale terminal) and software (QR code readers, Bluetooth functionality, Wi-Fi Aware, Nearfield Communication, etc.) to read mDLs.

  • mDLs must be able to function in both offline and online scenarios to ensure the security of consumer data and proper functionality.

The future

mDLs are just the beginning of the opportunities eID technology will bring. Once established by DMVs, eID technology can and will be used to find and buy insurance services, check medical prescriptions, apply for social/welfare benefits, open hunting/fishing/gaming accounts and display appropriate credentials, and access pension information. 

The versatility that eID technology provides will streamline American citizens’ identification arsenal, and the advancing mDL technology puts us on the path to get there. The question is not will mDLs become widespread, but when.
 

Related Services

Related Professionals

Jake is a Consultant in BerryDunn’s Justice and Public Safety Practice in the Government Consulting Group. He has worked on various justice and public safety projects including system implementations, point-in-time assessments, business process mapping, and vendor procurements. He is a Prosci®-certified Change Management Practitioner.

Professional
Jake Spaulding

Paige is a Senior Consultant in BerryDunn’s Justice and Public Safety Practice in the Government Consulting Group. Paige works with both local and state clients in the public sector in the justice and public safety field, including departments of motor vehicles, departments of correction, and judiciaries. Her projects range from system procurement and implementation to business process improvement and independent reviews. She is a Prosci®-certified Change Management Practitioner.

Professional
Paige Streeter

Read this if you are a State Medicaid Director, State Medicaid Chief Information Officer, State Medicaid Project Manager, or State Procurement Officer—or if you work on a State Medicaid Enterprise System (MES) certification or modernization efforts.

Click on the title to listen to the companion podcast to this article, Medicaid Enterprise Systems certification: Outcomes and APD considerations

Over the last two years, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has undertaken an effort to streamline MES certification. During this time, we have been fortunate enough to be a trusted partner in several states working to evolve the certification process. Through this collaboration with CMS and state partners, we have been in front of recent certification trends. The content we are covering is based on our experience supporting states with efforts related to CMS certification. We do not speak for CMS, nor do we have the authority to do so.

How does the focus on outcomes impact the way states think about funding for their Medicaid Enterprise Systems (MESs)?

Outcomes are becoming an integral part of states’ MES modernization efforts. We can see this on display in recent preliminary CMS guidance. CMS has advised states to begin incorporating outcome statements and metrics into APDs, Requests for Proposals (RFPs), and supporting vendor contracts. 

Outcomes and metrics allow states and federal partners to have more informed discussions about the business needs that states hope to achieve with their Medicaid IT systems. APDs will likely take on a renewed importance as states incorporate outcomes and metrics to demonstrate the benefits of their Medicaid IT systems.

What does this renewed importance mean for states as they prepare their APD submissions?

As we’ve seen with initial OBC pilots, enhanced operations funding depends upon the system’s ability to satisfy certification outcomes and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). 

Notably, states should also prepare to incorporate outcomes into all APD submissions—including updates to previously approved active APDs that did not identify outcomes in the most recent submission. 
 
This will likely apply to all stages of a project’s lifecycle—from system planning and procurement through operations. Before seeking funding for new IT systems, states should be able to effectively explain how the project would lead to tangible benefits and outcomes for the Medicaid program.

How do outcome statements align with and complement what we are seeing with outcomes-based or streamlined modular certification efforts?

Outcomes are making their way into funding and contracting vehicles and this really captures the scaling we discussed in our last conversation. States need to start thinking about reprocurement and modernization projects in terms of business goals, organizational development, and business process improvement and redesign. What will a state get out of the new technology that they do not get today? States need to focus more on the business needs and less on the technical requirements.

Interestingly, what we are starting to see is the idea that the certification outcomes are not going to be sufficient to warrant enhanced funding matches from CMS. Practically, this means states should begin thinking critically about want they want out of their Medicaid IT procurements as they look to charter those efforts. 

We have even started to see CMS return funding and contracting vehicles to states with guidance that the outcomes aren’t really sufficiently conveying what tangible benefit the state hopes to achieve. Part of this challenge is understanding what an outcome actually is. States are used to describing those technical requirements, but those are really system outputs, not program outcomes.

What exactly is an outcome and what should states know when developing meaningful outcomes?

As states begin developing outcomes for their Medicaid IT projects, it will be important to distinguish between outcomes and outputs for the Medicaid program. If you think about programs, broadly speaking, they aim to achieve a desired outcome by taking inputs and resources, performing activities, and generating outputs.

As a practical example, we can think about the benefits associated with health and exercise programs. If a person wants to improve their overall health and wellbeing, they could enroll in a health and exercise program. By doing so, this person would likely need to acquire new resources, like healthy foods and exercise equipment. To put those resources to good use, this person would need to engage in physical exercise and other activities. These resources and activities will likely, over time, lead to improved outputs in that person’s heart rate, body weight, mood, sleeping patterns, etc.
 
In this example, the desired outcome is to improve the person’s overall health and wellbeing. This person could monitor their progress by measuring their heart rates over time, the amount of sleep they receive each night, or fluctuations in their body weight—among others. These outputs and metrics all support the desired outcome; however, none of the outputs alone improves this person’s health and wellbeing.

States should think of outcomes as the big-picture benefits they hope to achieve for the Medicaid program. Sample outcomes could include improved eligibility determination accuracy, increased data accessibility for beneficiaries, and timely management of fraud, waste, and abuse.
 
By contrast, outputs should be thought of as the immediate, direct result of the Medicaid program’s activities. One example of an output might be the amount of time required to enroll providers after their initial application. To develop meaningful outcomes for their Medicaid program, states will need to identify big-picture benefits, rather than immediate results. With this is mind, states can develop outcomes to demonstrate the value of their Medicaid IT systems and identify outputs that help achieve their desired outcomes.

What are some opportunities states have in developing outcomes for their MES modernizations?

The opportunities really begin with business process improvement. States can begin by taking a critical look at their current state business processes and understanding where their challenges are. Payment and enrollment error rates or program integrity-related challenges may be obvious starting points; however, drilling down further into the day-to-day can give an even more informed understanding of your business needs. Do your staff end users have manual and/or duplicative processes or even process workarounds (e.g., entering the same data multiple times, entering data into one system that already exists in another, using spreadsheets to track information because the MES can’t accommodate a new program, etc.)? Is there a high level of redundancy? Some of those types of questions start to get at the heart of meaningful improvement.

Additionally, states need to be aware of the people side of change. The shift toward an outcomes-based environment is likely going to place greater emphasis on organizational change management and development. In that way, states can look at how they prepare their workforce to optimize these new technologies.

The certification landscape is seemingly changing weekly as states wait eagerly for CMS’ next guidance issuances. Please continue to check back for in-depth analyses and OBC success stories. Additionally, if you are considering an OBC effort and have questions, please contact our Medicaid Consulting team

Article
Outcomes and APD considerations

Read this if you are a State Medicaid Director, State Medicaid Chief Information Officer, State Medicaid Project Manager, or State Procurement Officer—or if you work on a State Medicaid Enterprise System (MES) certification or modernization efforts.

This article is based on the Outcomes-Based Certification scalability and project outcomes podcast:


Over the last two years, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has undertaken an effort to streamline MES certification. During this time, we have been fortunate enough to be a trusted partner in several states working to evolve the certification process. Through this collaboration with CMS and state partners, we have been in front of recent certification trends. The content we are covering is based on our experience supporting states with efforts related to CMS certification. We do not speak for CMS, nor do we have the authority to do so.

How might Outcomes-Based Certification (OBC) be applied to more complex areas of the Medicaid enterprise?

The question of scaling—that is, to apply the OBC process to more complex components while maintaining or increasing its level of efficiency—is an important next step in certification. OBC has been (or is being) scaled across the technical components of the MES in two primary ways. First, OBC has already successfully been scaled horizontally across similar but discrete components of the MES such as electronic visit verification (EVV), provider management, or pharmacy. The second, perhaps more interesting way we are seeing OBC scale is vertically. OBC—or what is now being referred to as Streamlined Modular Certification (SMC)—is now being scaled up and into larger and more complex components like financial management and claims processing. Beyond that, however, we are now seeing outcomes-based concepts scale a third way—across the Medicaid business.

How does the certification of one module impact the rest of the MES?

We are seeing CMS and states work through this question every day. What we know for sure is that each state is likely going to draw its own set of boxes around its business modules and service components based on its Medicaid business. Because modularity is only defined at a macro level, states have the freedom to work with their vendors to define the parameters of their modules. As a result, we have seen CMS work with states to define those boxes and in doing so, we are really seeing a three-layered approach.

The first layer represents the primary module a state is certifying. A primary module is that module that is responsible for all or most of a business process such as paying a claim. It is safe to assume that the most detailed evidence will come from the primary module. The second layer represents the module—or modules—that might not have responsibility for a business process, but provide functionality integral to that business process being performed successfully. Finally, the third layer represents the module—or modules—that feed data into the business process, but do little else when it comes to performing that business process. For the second and third layer, a state can likely expect to provide evidence that supports the successful transmission of data at a minimum. This is where we are seeing CMS and states work together to define that scope.

What is the role of business process improvement, organization development, and organizational change management in MES modernizations?

This is really the cornerstone of this fundamental shift in certification we have seen over the last 12-18 months. During the 2020 virtual Medicaid Enterprise Systems Conference (MESC), we saw that CMS appears to be signaling it is no longer going to readily accept modernization efforts that do not reflect tangible improvements to the Medicaid business. Think about it this way: a state will likely not be able to go to CMS to request enhanced funding simply because it can no longer renew its existing contract vehicles or it is trying to procure new technology that fails to represent a marked improvement over its legacy system. 

As a result, states need to start thinking about reprocurement and modernization projects in terms of organizational development and business process improvement and redesign. What will a state get out of the new technology that they do not get today? That’s the question that needs to be answered. States should begin to focus more on business needs and less on technical requirements. States are used to building a custom, monolithic enterprise, often referred to as a Medicaid Management Information System (MMIS). Today, vendors are bringing commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) products that allow states to perform business processes more efficiently. In turn, states need to move away from attempting to prescribe how a system should perform and focus on what the system should do. That means less prescriptive requirements and more business-oriented thinking.

Additionally, the concept of outcomes management will become integral to a state’s Advance Planning Document (APD) requests, Request for Proposals (RFP) development, and certification. We are seeing that CMS is beginning to look for outcomes in procurement documents, which is leading states to look critically at what they want to achieve as they seek to charter new projects. One way that a state can effectively incorporate outcomes management into its project development is to identify an outcome owner responsible for achieving those outcomes.

The certification landscape is seemingly changing weekly, as states wait eagerly for CMS’ next guidance issuances. Please continue to check back for in-depth analyses and OBC success stories. Additionally, if you are considering an OBC effort and have questions, please contact our Medicaid Consulting team

Article
Scaling project outcomes

Read this if you are at a rural health clinic or are considering developing one.

Section 130 of H.R. 133, the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 (Covid Relief Package) has become law. The law includes the most comprehensive reforms of the Medicare RHC payment methodology since the mid-1990s. Aimed at providing a payment increase to capped RHCs (freestanding and provider-based RHCs attached to hospitals greater than 50 beds), the provisions will simultaneously narrow the payment gap between capped and non-capped RHCs.

This will not obtain full “site neutrality” in payment, a goal of CMS and the Trump administration, but the new provisions will help maintain budget neutrality with savings derived from previously uncapped RHCs funding the increase to capped providers and other Medicare payment mechanisms.

Highlights of the Section 130 provision:

  • The limit paid to freestanding RHCs and those attached to hospitals greater than 50 beds will increase to $100 beginning April 1, 2021 and escalate to $190 by 2028.
  • Any RHC, both freestanding and provider-based, will be deemed “new” if certified after 12/31/19 and subject to the new per-visit cap.
  • Grandfathering would be in place for uncapped provider-based RHCs in existence as of 12/31/19. These providers would receive their current All-Inclusive Rate (AIR) adjusted annually for MEI (Medicare Economic Index) or their actual costs for the year.

If you have any questions about your specific situation, please contact us. We’re here to help.

Article
Section 130 Rural Health Clinic (RHC) modernization: Highlights

Read this if you have a responsibility for acquiring and implementing victim notifications for your jurisdiction.

In the first article of this three-part series we explored the challenges and risks associated with utilizing multiple victim notification systems across your state, while the second focused on exploring what the choices are to address these challenges. In this final installment, we demystify the process of developing requirements for a victim notification system. Here are some things to address when developing requirements:

  • Considering all of your victim notification stakeholders and their specific needs
  • “Mining” requirements from your current victim notification system to ensure that your current needs are met in the future system 
  • Determining what the market can support (and what it can’t)
  • Utilizing standards to increase the likelihood that market solutions, designed based on these standards, will meet the needs of your jurisdiction 

Understanding the needs (and wants) of your stakeholder group is critical to defining a successful set of requirements that meets your specific needs. Representative stakeholders may include:

  • Victim advocacy groups (both government run and private sector)
  • Police and sheriff departments
  • Department of Corrections 
  • The courts
  • Probation department
  • Prosecutor offices
  • The victims themselves

Of course the stakeholder group in your jurisdiction may differ, and the needs of these groups will also differ. For example, victims and advocacy groups are concerned about ease of use, accuracy, and timeliness of notifications. Police and sheriff departments may be concerned about ensuring they are meeting their statutory and moral obligations to notify the victims when offenders are released from custody. 

Since these groups have varied needs, it’s important to engage them early and throughout the requirements development process. Talk to them, observe their practices, and review their current systems. It’s possible, for example, that it’s important that sheriff departments can integrate their jail management system to the replacement victim notification system and the integration creates a seamless and timeline notification process when an offender is processed out of jail and into the community. Because the Department of Corrections is designed to hold offenders for a longer period of time, the department may require that their offender management system triggers an alert to victims when pre-release planning activities begin.

Scaling victim notification systems

Utilization of victim notification systems can also include a broad spectrum; from a single jail engaging with a victim notification system vendor to provide specific notification services, to a statewide victim notification system that provides these services for the larger stakeholder group. Because of this, your requirements must reflect that “scale.” Consider the utilization of the system before developing your requirements so that you don’t over (or under) engineer the system for your jurisdiction.

As mentioned in the second article in this series, there are many victim notification system options to consider, from home-grown applications to turnkey software as a service (SaaS) services. Regardless of the path you choose, consider leveraging the victim notification system standards as defined by the Department of Justice (DOJ) Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA SAVIN Guidelines). These guidelines and standards are terrific sources for victim notification system requirements, and can be thought-provoking as you engage your stakeholder groups. 

Though these standards are extremely useful, be sure to identify and include any jurisdiction-specific needs in your set of requirements. They may be driven by state statutes or by local policy or process. In defining your unique requirements, just ask, “Why are they important? Were they defined based on processes put in place because you don’t have a strong victim notification system, or are they critical to satisfying statute or policy?”

Stakeholder communication and engagement

Once you develop a preliminary set of requirements, it’s important to meet with the stakeholder groups to refine and prioritize the requirements. This exercise will result in a clear and concise set of requirements that are understandable by victim notification system vendors that may be responding to the resulting solicitation. When defining the requirements themselves, we find it useful to follow the guidelines from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE) called “IEEE Recommended Practice for Software Requirements Specifications.” According to the IEEE standard, good software and hardware requirements should be: 

  1. Correct
  2. Unambiguous
  3. Complete
  4. Consistent
  5. Ranked for importance
  6. Verifiable
  7. Modifiable
  8. Traceable

Prioritization of the requirements also helps responding vendors understand which requirements are most important to your jurisdiction. This prioritization model can also be used when scoring the vendors’ responses to the requirements once proposals have been received. 

Conclusion

In summary, it is important your victim notification system requirements reflect the needs of your stakeholders, are realistic, and clear. Vendors will be asked to respond to how they can accommodate the requirements, so using the IEEE method described above can be useful. 

Though this article doesn’t dive deeply into the development of the request for proposals (RFP) for the victim notification system, below are some actions to take to improve your chances for a successful system selection project:

  1. Define a meaningful project scope to scale the vendor market
  2. Assign a balanced evaluation committee with impartial scoring criteria
  3. Craft a structured procurement package that attracts multiple vendors
  4. Design a reasonable and achievable RFP schedule of events
  5. Reduce ambiguity and increasing clarity of RFP terms

If you have questions about your specific situation, please contact our Justice & Public Safety consulting team. We’re here to help. The BerryDunn team has developed a mature methodology for determining victim notification system requirements, and has a rich repository of requirements to start with so that you don’t need to start from scratch.
 

Article
Victim notification system requirements: It's easier (and harder) than you think

Read this if you are a director or manager at a Health and Human Services agency in charge of modernizing your state's Health and Human Services systems. 

When states start to look at outdated Health and Human Services systems like Eligibility Systems or Medicaid Enterprise Systems, they spend a lot of time on strategic planning efforts and addressing technology deficiencies that set the direction for their agencies. While they pay a lot of attention to the technology aspects of the work, they often overlook others. Here are three to pay attention to: 

  1. Business process improvement
  2. Organization development
  3. Organizational change management

Including these important steps in strategic planning often improves the likelihood of an implementation of Health and Human Service systems that provide the fully intended value or benefit to the citizen they help serve. When planning major system improvements, agencies need to have the courage to ask other critical questions that, when answered, will help guarantee greater success upon implementation of modernized system.

Don’t forget, it’s not only about new technology—it’s about gaining efficiencies in your business processes, structuring your organization in a manner that supports business process improvements, and helping the people in your organization and external stakeholders accept change.  

Business process improvement 

When thinking about improving business processes, a major consideration is to identify what processes can be improved to save time and money, and deliver services to those in need faster. When organizations experience inefficiencies in their business processes, more often than not the underlying processes and systems are at fault, not the people. Determining which processes require improvement can be challenging. However, analyzing your business processes is a key factor in strategic planning, understanding the challenges in existing processes and their underlying causes, and developing solutions to eliminate or mitigate those causes are essential to business process improvement.

Once you pinpoint areas of process improvement, you can move forward with reviewing your organization, classifying needs for potential organization development, and begin developing requirements for the change your organization needs.

Organization development

An ideal organizational structure fully aligns with the mission, vision, values, goals, and strategy of an organization. One question to ask when considering the need for organization development is, “What does your organization need to look like to support your state’s to-be vision?” Answering this question can provide a roadmap that helps you achieve:

  1. Improved outcomes for vulnerable populations, such as those receiving Medicaid, TANF, SNAP, or other Health and Human Services benefits 
  2. Positive impacts on social determinants of health in the state
  3. Significant cost savings through a more leveraged workforce and consolidated offices with related fixed expenses—and turning focus to organizational change management

Organization development does not stop at reviewing an organization’s structure. It should include reviewing job design, cultural changes, training systems, team design, and human resource systems. Organizational change is inherent in organization development, which involves integration of a change management strategy. When working through organization development, consideration of the need for organizational change should be included in both resource development and as part of the cultural shift.

Organizational change management

Diverging from the norm can be an intimidating prospect for many people. Within your organization, you likely have diverse team members who have different perspectives about change. Some team members will be willing to accept change easily, some will see the positive outcomes from change, but have reservations about learning a new way of approaching their jobs, and there will be others who are completely resistant to change. 

Successful organizational change management happens by allowing team members to understand why the organization needs to change. Leaders can help staff gain this understanding by explaining the urgency for change that might include:

  • Aging technology: Outdated systems sometimes have difficulty transmitting data or completing simple automated tasks.
  • Outdated processes: “Because we’ve always done it this way” is a red flag, and a good reason to examine processes and possibly help alleviate stressors created by day-to-day tasks. It might also allow your organization to take care of some vital projects that had been neglected because before there wasn’t time to address them as a result of outdated processes taking longer than necessary.
  • Barriers to efficiency: Duplicative processes caused by lack of communication between departments within the organization, refusal to change, or lack of training can all lead to less efficiency.

To help remove stakeholder resistance to change and increase excitement (and adoption) around new initiatives, you must make constant communication and training an integral component of your strategic plan. 

Investing in business process improvement, organization development, and organizational change management will help your state obtain the intended value and benefits from technology investments and most importantly, better serve citizens in need. 

Does your organization have interest in learning more about how to help obtain the fully intended value and benefits from your technology investments? Contact our Health and Human Services consulting team to talk about how you can incorporate business process improvement, organization development, and organizational change management activities into your strategic planning efforts.

Article
People and processes: Planning health and human services IT systems modernization to improve outcomes

Read this if you have a responsibility for acquiring and implementing victim notifications for your jurisdiction.

In the first article of this three-part series we explored the challenges and risks associated with utilizing multiple victim notification systems across your state. In this article we will explore what the choices are to address these challenges. 

System elements to consider

Many jurisdictions are under the impression that there are only one or two choices for victim notification systems. Though there are certainly market leaders in this space, you should select a system model that best meets your jurisdiction’s profile. The profile may include some of these elements:

  • Risk aversion (i.e., How risk averse is your organization regarding system implementations?)
  • Budget (i.e., How will the initial project be funded? Does your jurisdiction prefer an annual subscription model, or a traditional perpetual license with annual maintenance and support fees?)
  • Staff (Who do you need to implement and maintain the operational system?)
  • Time (i.e., Are you already out of compliance with state statutes?)
  • Hosting environment (i.e., Do you want to host in the cloud or on premise?)
  • Victim notification reach (i.e., state-wide, single jurisdiction, multiple justice partners)
  • Victim notification policy and statute complexity
  • Data ownership (i.e., To what degree does your jurisdiction enable the selling of victim notification data outside of the jurisdiction?)

Victim notification solutions range from hosted commercial off the shelf (COTS) solutions, which are typically least expensive; to custom solutions developed to address jurisdiction-specific needs. The latter tend to be more expensive, riskier than turnkey solutions, and take longer to operationalize. However, if your jurisdiction has unique requirements for victim notification, this may be a viable option. Unless you plan to engage the development vendor in a long-term contract for maintenance of this type of system, you must consider the impact on your existing IT staff. “Platform” solutions are a hybrid of COTS and custom development. With these solutions, there is typically a platform (i.e., Customer Relationship Management or CRM) on which the victim notification system is developed. Using a platform de-risks the development of the application’s architecture, may be a slightly less costly approach, and may simplify the maintenance of a system that is addressing unique requirements.

You may also already have licenses for victim notification capabilities, and not even realize it. Some offender management systems (OMS), jail management systems (JMS), and even prosecution systems (that support victim advocacy functions) may have built-in victim notification functionality included for the licensing price you are currently paying, or may include the option to purchase an add-on module. 

Advantages of using victim notification capabilities packaged with an existing system may include:

  • Lower acquisition and maintenance costs
  • Tighter integration with the OMS, JMS, or prosecution system may result in more seamless utilization of offender and victim data
  • You have a single contract, with a single vendor, reducing contract management overhead

A likely disadvantage, however, is the victim notification functionality may not be a robust as a point solution, or custom-built system. Additionally, if the “reach” of the JMS is a single county, then victim notification capabilities built into your JMS may not suffice for statewide use. However, if the built-in functionality meets your needs, then this is certainly a viable path to consider.

As mentioned in the first article, regardless of your approach the integration between your victim notification system and the JMS, OMS, prosecution system, and court system is critical to reducing redundancy and increasing the timeliness with which both offender and victim data is entered into the victim notification system―and used to trigger the notifications themselves.

Determining the best option for your victim notification system

So how do you determine which choice is best for your jurisdiction? The first step is to determine your jurisdiction’s risk profile versus the need to for jurisdiction-specific functionality. 

Mature market-based solutions are typically less risky to implement, since multiple jurisdictions are likely successfully using them to support their victim notification operations. However, these solutions may not be customizable or flexible enough to address your specific needs. 

“Build” models (using platform solutions or other application development models) tend to be a bit more risky (as many “from scratch” development projects can be); however these are more likely to address your specific needs. Here are a few questions that you should ask before making a determination between a COTS solution and a custom-build:

  1. Do we really have jurisdiction-specific victim notification needs?
  2. Can a COTS solution meet the statutes and policies in our jurisdiction?
  3. How risk-averse is our jurisdiction?
  4. Do we have time to develop a customized solution?
  5. Do we have the talent and capacity to maintain a custom solution?

Budget considerations

The next step is to determine your budget. We recommend you assess a budget over a 10-year total cost of ownership. The cost of a traditional, perpetual license-based COTS solution, including initial acquisition and implementation, will be higher in the first few years of use, but the ongoing annual fees will be lower. The cost of a custom-build solution will be even higher in the first few years, but annual maintenance should drop off dramatically. The cost of a subscription-based COTS solution will be relative even year over year. However, if you model these costs over 10 years, you will have a reasonable sense for how these costs trend (i.e., the cost of a subscription-based model will likely be higher over 10 years than the perpetual license model). 

The other consideration is how you plan to fund the system. If there are capital funds in the budget for initial acquisition and implementation, this may benefit the perpetual license model more than the subscription-based model. Regardless of the funding approach, you will likely be using the selected victim notification method for a significant period of time, so don’t settle.

Finally, determine how to acquire the system (or systems integration vendor that will help you develop the system), which is the subject of the third article in our series.

If you have questions about your specific situation, please contact our Justice & Public Safety team. We’re here to help. To learn more about other choices in victim notification procedures and systems, stay tuned for our third article in this series where we explore the process (and pitfalls) of procuring a statewide victim notification system.

Article
Victim notification systems: What choice do you have?

CYSHCN programs have new care coordination standards―how does your agency measure up?

On October 15, 2020, the National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP) released new care coordination standards for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) programs. The National Care Coordination Standards supplement the National Standards for Systems of Care, helping to ensure that children and youth with special health care needs receive the high-quality care coordination needed to address their specific health conditions.

The standards also set requirements for screening, identification, and assessment, a comprehensive shared plan of care, coordinated team-based communication, development of child and family empowerment skills, a well-trained care coordination workforce, and smooth care transitions. 

What do the standards mean for CYSHCN programs

The National Care Coordination Standards are more than guidelines for CYSHCN programs; aligning with the standards can lead to operational efficiencies, greater program capacity, and improved health outcomes. The standards can serve as a lens for continuous improvement, highlighting where programs can make changes that reduce the burden on care coordinators and program administrators.

However, striving to meet the standards can be challenging for many programs—as the standards develop and evolve over time, many programs struggle to keep up with the work required to update processes and retrain staff. Assessing a CYSHCN program’s processes and procedures takes time and resources that many state agencies do not have available. Despite the challenge, when state agencies are the most strapped is often when making change is the most needed. A shrinking public health workforce and growing population of CYSHCN means smooth processes are essential. To take steps towards National Care Coordination Standards alignment, BerryDunn recommends the following approach: 

A proven methodology for national standards alignment

There are many ways you can align with the standards. Here are three areas to focus on that can help you guide your agency to successful alignment. 

  1. Know your program
    It can be easy for processes to deteriorate over time. Process mapping is an effective way to shed light on current work flows and begin to determine holes in the processes. Conducting fact-finding sessions to map out exactly how your program functions can help pinpoint areas of strength―and areas where there is room for improvement.
  2. Compare to the national standards
    Identify the gaps with a cross-walk of your program’s current procedures with the National Care Coordination Standards. We assess your alignment through a gap analysis of the process, highlighting how your program lines up with the new standards.
  3. Adopt the changes and reap the benefits
    Process redesign can help implement the standards, and even small adjustments to processes can lead to better outcomes. Additionally, you can deploy proven change management methodologies programs that ease staff into new processes to produce real results.

Meeting national standards doesn’t have to be complicated. Our team partners with state public health agencies, helping to meet best practices without adding additional burden to program staff. We can help you take the moving pieces and complex tasks and funnel them into a streamlined process that gives your state’s children and youth the best care coordination. 

Article
Using process redesign to align with new CYSHCN standards