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COVID-
19 laws and their impact on state public health agencies

By: Sarah Stacki,

Laura Hill is a Consultant with BerryDunn working in the State Government Practice Area. She specializes in public health. She has experience working with state and local government public health agencies, not-for-profit organizations, and healthcare systems on strategic planning and project implementation. In addition, she has specialized training and expertise in food security, outdoor play environments for children, and obesity prevention in children and teens.

 Laura Hill
04.16.20

Read this if you work at a public health department and would like a brief summary of how you can maximize funding and meet new federal requirements.

Unpacking the trillions

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, several pieces of legislation were passed by congress and signed into law. The three bills, H.R. 6074 Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act, H.R. 6201 Families First Coronavirus Response Act, and H.R. 748 Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, have provided funding for various federal agencies with different roles in responding to the crisis. Because of the urgency required, much of the guidance for use of funds and reporting requirements were released after passage of the bills or have yet to be released.

Here is a brief timeline and summary of the acts:

Implication and next steps for state public health departments

While little guidance has been provided for how state public health departments should prepare to access federal funds, BerryDunn will continue to monitor and release updates as they become available. 

While at this point HR 6074 has the greatest implications for public health departments, here are some actions that states should take now for their public health programs from the recent legislation:

  1. H.R. 6074: Provides appropriations to the CDC to be allocated to states for COVID-19 expenses.
    • To ensure maximum funding, prepare a spend plan to submit to CDC.
    • To ensure compliance, provide CDC with copies or access to COVID-19 data collected with these funds.
    • To maximize the impact of new funding, develop a COVID-19 community intervention plan.
    • To support streamlined operations, submit revised work plans to CDC.
    • To prevent missed deadlines, submit any requests for deadline extensions to the CDC.
  2. H.R. 6201: Provides guidance specific to the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) programs.
    • To encourage social distancing and loosen administrative requirements, seek waivers through the USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS).
    • To ensure compliance, prepare to submit a report summarizing the use of waivers on population outcomes by March 2021.
  3. H.R. 748: Allocates $150 billion to a coronavirus relief fund for state, local, and tribal governments.
  • To secure funding, monitor the US Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) for guidance on using funds for:
    • Coronavirus prevention and preparation
    • Tools to build health data infrastructure
    • COVID-19 Public Health Emergency expenses
    • Developing countermeasures and vaccines for coronavirus
    • Telehealth and rural health activities
       
  • To ensure HIPAA compliance when sharing protected patient health information, monitor the US Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) for guidance.

For more information

For specific issues your agency has, or if you have other questions, please contact us. We’re here to help. 

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CYSHCN programs have new care coordination standards―how does your agency measure up?

On October 15, 2020, the National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP) released new care coordination standards for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) programs. The National Care Coordination Standards supplement the National Standards for Systems of Care, helping to ensure that children and youth with special health care needs receive the high-quality care coordination needed to address their specific health conditions.

The standards also set requirements for screening, identification, and assessment, a comprehensive shared plan of care, coordinated team-based communication, development of child and family empowerment skills, a well-trained care coordination workforce, and smooth care transitions. 

What do the standards mean for CYSHCN programs

The National Care Coordination Standards are more than guidelines for CYSHCN programs; aligning with the standards can lead to operational efficiencies, greater program capacity, and improved health outcomes. The standards can serve as a lens for continuous improvement, highlighting where programs can make changes that reduce the burden on care coordinators and program administrators.

However, striving to meet the standards can be challenging for many programs—as the standards develop and evolve over time, many programs struggle to keep up with the work required to update processes and retrain staff. Assessing a CYSHCN program’s processes and procedures takes time and resources that many state agencies do not have available. Despite the challenge, when state agencies are the most strapped is often when making change is the most needed. A shrinking public health workforce and growing population of CYSHCN means smooth processes are essential. To take steps towards National Care Coordination Standards alignment, BerryDunn recommends the following approach: 

A proven methodology for national standards alignment

There are many ways you can align with the standards. Here are three areas to focus on that can help you guide your agency to successful alignment. 

  1. Know your program
    It can be easy for processes to deteriorate over time. Process mapping is an effective way to shed light on current work flows and begin to determine holes in the processes. Conducting fact-finding sessions to map out exactly how your program functions can help pinpoint areas of strength―and areas where there is room for improvement.
  2. Compare to the national standards
    Identify the gaps with a cross-walk of your program’s current procedures with the National Care Coordination Standards. We assess your alignment through a gap analysis of the process, highlighting how your program lines up with the new standards.
  3. Adopt the changes and reap the benefits
    Process redesign can help implement the standards, and even small adjustments to processes can lead to better outcomes. Additionally, you can deploy proven change management methodologies programs that ease staff into new processes to produce real results.

Meeting national standards doesn’t have to be complicated. Our team partners with state public health agencies, helping to meet best practices without adding additional burden to program staff. We can help you take the moving pieces and complex tasks and funnel them into a streamlined process that gives your state’s children and youth the best care coordination. 

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Using process redesign to align with new CYSHCN standards

Revolutionizing the way information is stored and received, blockchain is one of the most influential technologies of the past decade. Mostly known for its success with the digital payment system, Bitcoin, blockchain also has potential to transform the public sector, and further, the way citizens interact with government. Many states are considering this potential, but are stuck asking the most basic question: How can the public sector implement blockchain? The first step is to understand exactly what blockchain really is.

Blockchain—What is it?
At the highest level, blockchain is termed a Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT): data within a blockchain is not controlled by a single, centralized entity, but rather, is held by millions of systems simultaneously. This “chain” of systems, or DLT, not only decentralizes data, but also ensures it is incorruptible, as each “block” of data in the DLT connects using highly advanced encryption technology. Further, you can share each “block” without exposing the entirety of the blockchain’s data, enabling data sharing without compromising sensitive information. Blockchain’s opportunity lies in the core of its model, as being able to securely share records (containing sensitive information such as birth certificates, marriage licenses, property deeds, professional licenses, etc.), could connect different government services and create more efficient processes.

States across the nation are intrigued by the potential of blockchain, but unsure of just how to implement it successfully. Illinois, through the Illinois Blockchain Initiative, has been a leader in exploring blockchain’s possibilities in government. Here is some of their first-hand insight and advice.

Blockchain in Government—Illinois’ Perspective
Sunil Thomas, Cluster CIO, State of Illinois, assisted in the creation of the Illinois Blockchain Initiative in 2016, and is now a leader in testing and implementing blockchain technology across state services. BerryDunn connected with Sunil in August 2018, and he provided unique advice for other states considering a blockchain initiative.

Specifically, Sunil broke down the processes the Initiative used to advance the technology within the state, and shared three key pieces of advice for successful blockchain implementation:

  1. Host a statewide education campaign for blockchain to ensure all state leaders, including legislators, are equipped with a clear understanding of blockchain technology and its place in government. This education campaign may include extensive research into blockchain technology. Illinois, for instance, began their initiative by issuing a Request for Information (RFI) from vendors within the blockchain market. Additionally, Illinois collaborated with a local start-up that specializes in blockchain in order to gain subject matter expertise into blockchain development. 
  2. Initiate organized pilot projects to guide the direction of blockchain in the state and select what use cases should go through the full implementation process. At first, you should use blockchain projects to complement current state services. This ensures continuation of services, and allows for comprehensive transition time. Additionally, states should ask the questions: Why shouldn’t this service be delivered using a traditional solution?, and further, Why do we specifically need blockchain for this solution?, before each pilot. This will help you leverage the right services, with the greatest potential, as pilot blockchain projects.
  3. Create a statewide roadmap for blockchain to build an ecosystem that supports the technology. This “Blockchain Roadmap” should highlight a navigation plan for both state and federal regulations, and ensure that blockchain procurement strategies are understood. The roadmap can include a comprehensive cost-benefit analysis to determine a return on investment (ROI) for specific services considered for blockchain leverage. Overall, the roadmap will act as a guide throughout the entirety of the blockchain initiative, and will ensure the state’s vision for blockchain is achievable.

These key pieces of advice can provide a foundation for state’s looking to leverage blockchain to improve services; although each state should tailor blockchain technology to its specific needs. The Illinois Blockchain Initiative’s experience clearly demonstrates there is a way to navigate blockchain successfully in the public sector, and shows that the technology truly can assist in the transformation of government services moving forward.

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Blockchain in government: Advice from leaders at the Illinois Blockchain Initiative

Modernization means different things to different people—especially in the context of state government. For some, it is the cause of a messy chain reaction that ends (at best) in frustration and inefficiency. For others, it is the beneficial effect of a thoughtful and well-planned series of steps. The difference lies in the approach to transition - and states will soon discover this as they begin using the new Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS), a case management information system that helps them provide citizens with customized child welfare services.

The benefits of CCWIS are numerous and impressive, raising the bar for child welfare and providing opportunities to advance through innovative technology that promotes interoperability, flexibility, improved management, mobility, and integration. However, taking advantage of these benefits will also present challenges. Gone are the days of the cookie-cutter, “one-size-fits-all” approach. Here are five facts to consider as you transition toward an effective modernization.

  1. There are advantages and challenges to buying a system versus building a system internally. CCWIS transition may involve either purchasing a complete commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) product that suits the state, or constructing a new system internally with the implementation of a few purchased modules. To decide which option is best, first assess your current systems and staff needs. Specifically, consider executing a cost-benefit analysis of options, taking into account internal resource capabilities, feasibility, flexibility, and time. This analysis will provide valuable data that help you assess the current environment and identify functional gaps. Equipped with this information, you should be ready to decide whether to invest in a COTS product, or an internally-built system that supports the state’s vision and complies with new CCWIS regulations.
     
  2. Employ a modular approach to upgrading current systems or building new systems. The Children’s Bureau—an office of the Administration for Children & Families within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services—defines “modularity” as the breaking down of complex functions into separate, manageable, and independent components. Using this modular approach, CCWIS will feature components that function independently, simplifying future upgrades or procurements because they can be completed on singular modules rather than the entire system. Modular systems create flexibility, and enable you to break down complex functions such as “Assessment and Intake,” “Case Management,” and “Claims and Payment” into modules during CCWIS transition. This facilitates the development of a sustainable system that is customized to the unique needs of your state, and easily allows for future augmentation.
     
  3. Use Organizational Change Management (OCM) techniques to mitigate stakeholder resistance to change. People are notoriously resistant to change. This is especially true during a disruptive project that impacts day-to-day operations—such as building a new or transitional CCWIS system. Having a comprehensive OCM plan in place before your CCWIS implementation can help ensure that you assign an effective project sponsor, develop thorough project communications, and enact strong training methods. A clear OCM strategy should help mitigate employee resistance to change and can also support your organization in reaching CCWIS goals, due to early buy-in from stakeholders who are key to the project’s success.
     
  4. Data governance policies can help ensure you standardize mandatory data sharing. For example, the Children’s Bureau notes that a Title IV-E agency with a CCWIS must support collaboration, interoperability, and data sharing by exchanging data with Child Support Systems?Title IV-D, Child Abuse/Neglect Systems, Medicaid Management Information Systems (MMIS), and many others as described by the Children’s Bureau.

    Security is a concern due to the large amount of data sharing involved with CCWIS systems. Specifically, if a Title IV-E agency with a CCWIS does not implement foundational data security measures across all jurisdictions, data could become vulnerable, rendering the system non-compliant. However, a data governance framework with standardized policies in place can protect data and surrounding processes.
     
  5. Continuously refer to federal regulations and resources. With the change of systems comes changes in federal regulations. Fortunately, the Children’s Bureau provides guidance and toolkits to assist you in the planning, development, and implementation of CCWIS. Particularly useful documents include the “Child Welfare Policy Manual,” “Data Sharing for Courts and Child Welfare Agencies Toolkit,” and the “CCWIS Final Rule”. A comprehensive list of federal regulations and resources is located on the Children’s Bureau website.

    Additionally, the Children’s Bureau will assign an analyst to each state who can provide direction and counsel during the CCWIS transition. Continual use of these resources will help you reduce confusion, avoid obstacles, and ultimately achieve an efficient modernization program.

Modernization doesn’t have to be messy. Learn more about how OCM and data governance can benefit your agency or organization.

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Five things to keep in mind during your CCWIS transition

Read this if you are at a financial institution that uses FedLine® Solutions.

In response to an evolving security threat landscape, the Federal Reserve Bank has implemented a Security and Resiliency Assurance Program (“Assurance Program”). Financial institutions that use FedLine® Solutions will need to take action before year-end to comply with Assurance Program requirements. Here’s what you need to know.

Required assessment to be completed annually

Financial institutions are already required to implement, maintain, and assess technical and procedural security controls to safeguard their FedLine® connections. Starting in 2021, financial institutions must conduct an assessment of their compliance with the Federal Reserve Bank's FedLine® security requirements and submit an attestation that they have completed the assessment. The deadline for submitting the first attestation is December 31, 2021. Moving forward, this assessment and attestation must be completed annually.

This assessment can be performed internally by an independent internal department/function such as an internal audit or compliance department. The Federal Reserve Bank may, in its discretion, require the assessment be conducted or reviewed by an independent third party. End User Authorization Contacts (EUAC) for each organization were sent an Assurance Program kick-off packet with requirements and instructions in January 2021 to assist with the process. 

Immediate action 

Evaluate the requirements for your financial institution’s Assurance Program assessment as soon as possible. Planning for the 2021 assessment should be well underway. If you would like to discuss the Assurance Program requirements or you’ve been notified that your financial institution needs an independent third party review, contact us today.

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The Federal Reserve's FedLine® Solutions Security and Resiliency Assurance Program

Read this if you are a State Medicaid Director, State Medicaid Chief Information Officer, State Medicaid Project Manager, or State Procurement Officer.

Hurray! The in-person Medicaid Enterprise Systems Conference (MESC) was successfully held! It was a wonderful and true reunion for all those who attended the conference in Boston this year. Hats off to MESC’s sponsoring organization, NESCSO, for holding a hybrid in-person/virtual event. Although there were some minor technological glitches at the start, MESC went very smoothly. The curriculum, good planning, and hard work prevailed and led to a very successful conference.

Before highlighting the session content and conference themes, I must mention what first occurred upon arrival: We were able to greet our colleagues, partners, and vendor teams. How wonderful it was to be together with some colleagues who I had not seen for over two years! We all had stories and pictures that video conferencing just can’t convey, and being able to share them, face-fo-face (and tear-to-tear), was the highlight for me. Who cried when Shivane Pratap and Laura Licata played cello and violin Bach pieces for us? That would be me. 

Our Medicaid Practice Group team was not able to get to our agendas until checking in with each other. The joy of seeing people, hugging people, shaking hands, or bumping elbows or fists underscored the value of being able to utilize all our senses when we meet with people—after all, we are in a people industry, and it was amazing to see the care we have for each other, and it was a reminder that that care is the foundation of what we strive to deliver to the Medicaid population each and every day through our work.

What an amazing 18 months we’ve been through—hearing that the Medicaid population is now over 80 million, and that it exceeds the Medicare population is hard to fathom, and this means that the Medicaid population is 25% of our overall population, and Medicaid and Medicare populations combined are half of our population. I think the growth in Medicaid of 10 million members in just a few years is a reflection of the pandemic and hardships our nation is currently enduring.

In the midst of the loss endured as COVID-19 waves continue to seep through this world, we have accomplished much. I’m not sure if these gains seem bigger because it’s been two years since we last gathered, the appreciation of being able to get anything accomplished other than respond to the pandemic, or maybe we really have hit our goals out of the ballpark (most likely a mixture of all three).

Significant achievements of the past two years

Items of significant accomplishment and change since our last MESC in-person conference include:

  • A new administration and CMS Senior Leadership, Deputy Administrator and Director, Daniel Tsai
  • System and policy changes to accommodate needs driven by COVID-19, the substance use epidemic, and other hardships
  • Continued modular implementations, piloting of Outcomes-Based Certification and a focus on the Medicaid problems we are trying to solve
  • Steady progress on Medicaid Enterprise Systems modernization
  • Human-centered design focus
  • States seem to be striving to be more proactive and set up project management offices to help them be more efficient (great to hear attitudes like Kentucky’s, “If you can measure it, you can improve it.”). Examining the root cause with good planning helps reduce “reacting”
  • Agency collaboration and improvements in interoperability as well as collaboration with our federal CMS partners
  • Improved tools and monitoring tools (how about Tennessee’s dashboard demo!)

Challenges ahead that were raised in sessions and conversations during MESC include:

  • Public health emergency “unwinding” – lots of rule changes, potential re-enrollment for up to 80 million members
  • Coverage and access – healthcare is at a tipping point, and the future is a connected healthcare system
  • Equity and patient access
  • Whole person care innovation, delivery system reform, putting patients at the center
  • Managing data and data exchanges
  • Focus on Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR)—a progressive change

Inspiration to continue moving forward

Concepts of inspiration that I carry with me from this conference and will help me continue moving forward:

  • Many responses to the pandemic began organically with only a few, which grew to hundreds of thousands, showing us that a “few” (i.e., us) can lead to meaningful and impactful solutions.
  • Medicaid is about the people it’s serving, not the technology.
  • Everyone is born with creativity and the importance of curiosity as a form of listening
  • Collaboration is about peer respect—we need to understand what everyone is excellent at so we can count on them (thank you Michael Hendrix!)
  • Embrace change as a healthy way of being

We all know there is a lot going on right now and there is more to come—at work, in our lives, in our country, and on this planet. Our state partners need help as they are continually asked to do more (effectively) with less. States’ Medicaid members need help, and our state partners need help. Examining how we are structured, what tools and organizational and project management approaches we can leverage, and how we care for ourselves and our teams so we can be there for our citizens, will take us a long way towards a successful outcome. We are all in this together. Let’s dare to be bold, be creative, be innovative, be intentional—let’s lead the way to fulfil our vision and our mission!

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MESC 2021 reflections 

Read this if you are a State Medicaid Director, State Medicaid Chief Information Officer, State Medicaid Project Manager, or State Procurement Officer—or if you work on State Medicaid Enterprise System (MES) certification or modernization efforts.

As states transition to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' (CMS) Outcomes-Based Certification (OBC), many jurisdictions are also implementing (or considering implementation of) an Integrated Eligibility System (IES). Federal certification for a standalone Medicaid Enterprise System (MES) comes with its own challenges, especially as states navigate the recent shift to OBC for Medicaid Eligibility and Enrollment (E&E) services. Certification in the context of an IES creates a whole new set of considerations for states, as Medicaid eligibility overlaps with that of benefit programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistant Program (SNAP), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and others. We’ve identified the following areas for consideration in your own state's IES implementation: 

  • Modernizing MES 
    It's likely your state has considered the pros and cons of implementing an IES, since CMS' announcement of increased federal funds for states committed to building new and/or enhanced Medicaid systems. Determining whether an IES is the right solution is no small undertaking. From coordinating on user design to system security, development of an IES requires buy-in across a wider range of programs and stakeholders. Certification will look different from that of a standalone MES. For example, your state will not only need to ensure compliance with CMS' Minimum Acceptable Risk Standards for Exchanges (MARS-E), but also account for sensitive data, such as medical information, across program interfaces and integration. 

    BerryDunn recommends one of the first steps states take in the planning phase of their IES implementation is to identify how they will define their certification team. Federal certification itself does not yet reflect the level of integration states want to achieve with an IES, and will require as much subject matter expertise per program included in the IES as it requires an understanding of your state's targeted integration outcomes and desired overlap among programs.
  • Scale and scope of requirements
    Once your agency commits to designing an IES, the scope of its solution becomes much broader. With this comes a wider range of contract requirements. Requirements can be program-specific (e.g., relevant only to Medicaid) or program-agnostic (e.g., general technical, "look-and-feel", and security requirements that apply throughout the solution). Common requirements across certain programs (e.g., certain eligibility criteria) will also need to be determined. Requirements validation and the development of Requirements Traceability Matrixes (RTM) per program are critical parts of the development phase of an IES implementation.

    BerryDunn recommends a comprehensive mapping process of requirements to OBC and other federal certification criteria, to ensure system design is in compliance with federal guidance prior to entering go/no-go for system testing phases.
  • Outcomes as they apply across programs
    CMS' transition to OBC changed the way states define their Medicaid program outcomes. Under this new definition outcomes are the value-add, or the end result, a state wishes to achieve as the result of its Medicaid eligibility solution enhancements. In the context of an IES, Medicaid outcomes have to be considered in terms of their relation to other programs. For example, presumptive eligibility (PE) between SNAP and Medicaid and/or cross-program referrals might become more direct outcomes when there is an immediate data exchange between and among programs.

    BerryDunn recommends consideration of what you hope to achieve with your IES implementation. Is it simply an upgrade to an antiquated legacy system(s), or is the goal ultimately to improve data sharing and coordination across benefit programs? While certification documentation is submitted to individual federal agencies, cross-program outcomes can be worked into your contract requirements to ensure they are included in IES business rules and design.
  • Cost allocation
    In the planning phase of any Design, Development, and Implementation (DDI) project, states submit an Advance Planning Document (APD) to formally request Federal Financial Participation (FFP), pending certification review and approval. This APD process becomes more complex in an IES, as states need to account for FFP from federal programs in addition to CMS as well as develop a weighted cost allocation methodology to distribute shares equitably across benefit programs.

    BerryDunn recommends States utilize the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), Administration for Children & Families (ACF), Office of Child Support Enforcement's (OCSE) Cost Allocation Methodologies (CAM) Toolkit to inform your cost allocation model across benefit programs, as part of the APD development process
  • Timeline
    A traditional MES implementation timeline accounts for project stages such as configuration sessions, requirement mapping, design validation, testing, CMS' Operational Readiness Review (ORR), etc. The project schedule for an IES is dependent on additional factors and variables. Scheduling of federal certification reviews for OBC and/or other programs might be held up by project delays in another area of the implementation, and project teams must be agile enough to navigate such changes

    BerryDunn recommends development of a thoughtful, comprehensive project schedule allowing ample time for each project phase across programs. We also recommend states cultivate relationships with federal partners including, but not limited to, CMS, to communicate when a development delay is anticipated. Engaging federal partners throughout the DDI phases will be a critical part of your IES implementation.

In theory, an IES benefits stakeholders on both sides of the system. Caseworkers avoid duplication of efforts, reduce administrative costs, and ensure program integrity, while individuals and families on the receiving end of public benefit programs experience a more efficient, streamlined application process. In practice, the development of a comprehensive business rules, case management, and workflow system across human services programs can prove to be a heavy lift for states, including but not limited to considerations around certification to secure FFP. Planning for the implications of an IES implementation ahead of time will go a long way in preparing your agency and state for this comprehensive certification effort.
 
For further reading
Keep an eye out for the next blog in this series, highlighting certification guidelines across an IES implementation (for CMS and other Federal programs). You can read more on OBC here

If you have questions about your specific situation, please contact the Medicaid Consulting team. We’re here to help. 

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States transition to Outcomes-Based Certification: Considerations and recommendations

Read this if you are a State Medicaid Director, State Medicaid Chief Information Officer, State Medicaid Project Manager, or State Procurement Officer—or if you work on a State Medicaid Enterprise System (MES) certification or modernization efforts.

You can listen to the companion podcast to this article, Organization development: Shortcuts for states to consider, here: 

Over the last two years, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has undertaken an effort to streamline MES certification. During this time, we have been fortunate enough to be a trusted partner in several states working to evolve the certification process. Through this collaboration with CMS and state partners, we have been in front of recent certification trends. The content we are covering is based on our experience supporting states with efforts related to CMS certification. We do not speak for CMS, nor do we have the authority to do so.

What organization development (OD) shortcuts can state Medicaid agencies consider when faced with competing priorities and challenges such as Medicaid modernization projects in flight, staffing shortages, and a retiring workforce?

The shortcuts include rapid development and understanding of the “why”. This requires the courage to challenge assumptions, especially around transparency, to allow for a consistent understanding of the needs, data, environment, and staff members’ role in impacting the health of the people served by a state’s Medicaid program. To rapidly gain an understanding of the “why”, state Medicaid agencies should:

  1. Accelerate the transparency of information and use of data in ways that lead to a collective understanding of the “why”. Accelerating a collective understanding of the why requires improved communication mechanisms. 
  2. Invest time to connect with staff. The insistence, persistence, and consistency of leaders to stay connected to their workforce will help keep the focus on the “why” and build a shared sense of connection and purpose among teams.
  3. Create the standard that planning involves all stakeholders (e.g., policy, operations, systems staff, etc.) and focus on building consensus and alignment throughout the organization. During planning, identify answers to the following questions: What are we trying to achieve, what are the outcomes, and what is the vision for what we are trying to do?
  4. Question any fragmentation. For example, if there is a hiring freeze, several staff are retiring, and demand is increasing, it is a good idea to think about how the organization manages people. Question boundaries related to your staff and the business processes they perform (e.g., some staff can only complete a portion of a business process because of a job classification). Look at ways to broaden the expectations of staff, eliminate unnecessary handoffs, and expect development. Leaders and teams work together to build a culture that is vision-driven, data-informed, and values-based.

What are some considerations when organizations are defining program outcomes and the “why” behind what they are doing? 

Keep in mind that designing system requirements is not the same as designing program outcomes. System requirements need to be able to deliver the outcomes and the information the organization needs. With something like a Medicaid Enterprise System (MES) modernization project, outcomes are what follow because of a successful project or series of projects. For example, a state Medicaid agency looking to improve access to care might develop an outcome focused on enabling the timely and accurate screening and revalidation for Medicaid providers. 

Next, keeping with the improving access to care example, state Medicaid agencies should define and communicate the roles technology and staff play in helping achieve the desired outcome and continue communicating and helping staff understand the “why”. In Medicaid we impact people’s lives, and that makes it easy to find the heart. Helping staff connect their own motivation and find meaning in achieving an outcome is key to help ensure project success and realize desired outcomes. 

Program outcomes represents one of the six major categories related to organizational health: 

  1. Leadership
  2. Strategy
  3. Workforce
  4. Operations and process improvement 
  5. Person-centered service
  6. Program outcomes

Focusing on these six key areas during the analysis, planning, development, and integration will help organizations improve performance, increase their impact, and achieve program outcomes. Reach out to the BerryDunn’s Medicaid and Organization Development consulting team for more information about how organization develop can help your Medicaid agency.
 

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Outcomes and organization development, part II