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COVID-
19 and fraud―a security measures refresher

04.10.20

Read this if you would like a refresher of common-sense approaches to protect against fraud while working remotely.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) has imposed many challenges upon us physically, mentally, and financially. Directly or indirectly, we all are affected by the outbreak of this life-threatening disease. Anxious times like this provide perfect opportunities for fraudsters. The fraud triangle is a model commonly used to explain the three components that may cause someone to commit fraud when they occur together:

  1. Financial pressure/motivation 
    In March 2020, the unemployment rate increased by 0.9 percent to 4.4 percent, and the number of unemployed persons rose by 1.4 million to 7.1 million.
  2. Perceived opportunity to commit fraud 
    Many people are online all day, providing more opportunities for internet crime. People are also desperate for something, from masks and hand sanitizers to coronavirus immunization and cures, which do not yet exist. 
  3. Rationalization 
    People use their physical, mental, or financial hardship to justify their unethical behaviors.

To combat the increasing coronavirus-related fraud and crime, the Department of Justice (DOJ) launched a national coronavirus fraud task force on March 23, 2020. It focuses on the detection, investigation, and prosecution of fraudulent activity, hoarding, and price gouging related to medical resources needed to respond to the coronavirus. US attorney’s offices are also forming local task forces where federal, state, and local law enforcement work together to combat the coronavirus related crimes. Things are changing fast, and the DOJ has daily updates on the task force activities. 

Increased awareness for increased threats

Given the increase in fraudulent activity during the COVID-19 outbreak, it’s important for employees now working from home to be aware of ways to protect themselves and their companies and prevent the spread of fraud. Here are some of the top COVID-19-related fraud schemes to be aware of. 

  • Phishing emails regarding virus information, general financial relief, stimulus payments, and airline carrier refunds
  • Fake charities requesting donations for illegitimate or non-existent organizations 
  • Supply scams including fake shops, websites, social media accounts, and email addresses claiming to sell supplies in high demand but then never providing the supplies and keeping the money 
  • Website and app scams that share COVID-19 related information and then insert malware that could compromise the device and your personal information
  • Price gouging and hoarding of scarce products
  • Robocalls or scammers asking for personal information or selling of testing, cures, and essential equipment
  • Zoom bombing and teleconference hacking

If you have encountered suspicious activity listed above, please report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center.

Staying vigilant

To protect yourself from these threats, remember to use proper security measures and follow these tips provided by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and DOJ:

  • Verify the identity of the company, charity, or individual that attempts to contact you in regards to COVID-19.
  • Do not send money to any business, charity, or individual requesting payments or donations in cash, by wire transfer, gift card, or through the mail. 
  • Understand the features of your teleconference platform and utilize private meetings with a unique code or password that is not shared publicly.
  • Do not open attachments or click links within emails from senders you do not recognize.
  • Do not provide your username, password, date of birth, social security number, insurance information, financial data, or other personal information in response to an email or robocall.
  • Always verify the web address of legitimate websites and manually type them into your browser.
  • Check for misspellings or wrong domains within a link (for example, an address that should end in a ".gov" ends in .com" instead).

Stay aware, and stay informed. If you have specific concerns or questions, or would like more information, please contact our team. We’re here to help.
 

Related Professionals

Read this if you are a State Medicaid Director, State Medicaid Chief Information Officer, State Medicaid Project Manager, or State Procurement Officer—or if you work on a State Medicaid Enterprise System (MES) certification or modernization efforts.

This article is based on the Outcomes-Based Certification scalability and project outcomes podcast:


Over the last two years, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has undertaken an effort to streamline MES certification. During this time, we have been fortunate enough to be a trusted partner in several states working to evolve the certification process. Through this collaboration with CMS and state partners, we have been in front of recent certification trends. The content we are covering is based on our experience supporting states with efforts related to CMS certification. We do not speak for CMS, nor do we have the authority to do so.

How might Outcomes-Based Certification (OBC) be applied to more complex areas of the Medicaid enterprise?

The question of scaling—that is, to apply the OBC process to more complex components while maintaining or increasing its level of efficiency—is an important next step in certification. OBC has been (or is being) scaled across the technical components of the MES in two primary ways. First, OBC has already successfully been scaled horizontally across similar but discrete components of the MES such as electronic visit verification (EVV), provider management, or pharmacy. The second, perhaps more interesting way we are seeing OBC scale is vertically. OBC—or what is now being referred to as Streamlined Modular Certification (SMC)—is now being scaled up and into larger and more complex components like financial management and claims processing. Beyond that, however, we are now seeing outcomes-based concepts scale a third way—across the Medicaid business.

How does the certification of one module impact the rest of the MES?

We are seeing CMS and states work through this question every day. What we know for sure is that each state is likely going to draw its own set of boxes around its business modules and service components based on its Medicaid business. Because modularity is only defined at a macro level, states have the freedom to work with their vendors to define the parameters of their modules. As a result, we have seen CMS work with states to define those boxes and in doing so, we are really seeing a three-layered approach.

The first layer represents the primary module a state is certifying. A primary module is that module that is responsible for all or most of a business process such as paying a claim. It is safe to assume that the most detailed evidence will come from the primary module. The second layer represents the module—or modules—that might not have responsibility for a business process, but provide functionality integral to that business process being performed successfully. Finally, the third layer represents the module—or modules—that feed data into the business process, but do little else when it comes to performing that business process. For the second and third layer, a state can likely expect to provide evidence that supports the successful transmission of data at a minimum. This is where we are seeing CMS and states work together to define that scope.

What is the role of business process improvement, organization development, and organizational change management in MES modernizations?

This is really the cornerstone of this fundamental shift in certification we have seen over the last 12-18 months. During the 2020 virtual Medicaid Enterprise Systems Conference (MESC), we saw that CMS appears to be signaling it is no longer going to readily accept modernization efforts that do not reflect tangible improvements to the Medicaid business. Think about it this way: a state will likely not be able to go to CMS to request enhanced funding simply because it can no longer renew its existing contract vehicles or it is trying to procure new technology that fails to represent a marked improvement over its legacy system. 

As a result, states need to start thinking about reprocurement and modernization projects in terms of organizational development and business process improvement and redesign. What will a state get out of the new technology that they do not get today? That’s the question that needs to be answered. States should begin to focus more on business needs and less on technical requirements. States are used to building a custom, monolithic enterprise, often referred to as a Medicaid Management Information System (MMIS). Today, vendors are bringing commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) products that allow states to perform business processes more efficiently. In turn, states need to move away from attempting to prescribe how a system should perform and focus on what the system should do. That means less prescriptive requirements and more business-oriented thinking.

Additionally, the concept of outcomes management will become integral to a state’s Advance Planning Document (APD) requests, Request for Proposals (RFP) development, and certification. We are seeing that CMS is beginning to look for outcomes in procurement documents, which is leading states to look critically at what they want to achieve as they seek to charter new projects. One way that a state can effectively incorporate outcomes management into its project development is to identify an outcome owner responsible for achieving those outcomes.

The certification landscape is seemingly changing weekly, as states wait eagerly for CMS’ next guidance issuances. Please continue to check back for in-depth analyses and OBC success stories. Additionally, if you are considering an OBC effort and have questions, please contact our Medicaid Consulting team

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Scaling project outcomes

Read this if you are at a rural health clinic or are considering developing one.

Section 130 of H.R. 133, the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 (Covid Relief Package) has become law. The law includes the most comprehensive reforms of the Medicare RHC payment methodology since the mid-1990s. Aimed at providing a payment increase to capped RHCs (freestanding and provider-based RHCs attached to hospitals greater than 50 beds), the provisions will simultaneously narrow the payment gap between capped and non-capped RHCs.

This will not obtain full “site neutrality” in payment, a goal of CMS and the Trump administration, but the new provisions will help maintain budget neutrality with savings derived from previously uncapped RHCs funding the increase to capped providers and other Medicare payment mechanisms.

Highlights of the Section 130 provision:

  • The limit paid to freestanding RHCs and those attached to hospitals greater than 50 beds will increase to $100 beginning April 1, 2021 and escalate to $190 by 2028.
  • Any RHC, both freestanding and provider-based, will be deemed “new” if certified after 12/31/19 and subject to the new per-visit cap.
  • Grandfathering would be in place for uncapped provider-based RHCs in existence as of 12/31/19. These providers would receive their current All-Inclusive Rate (AIR) adjusted annually for MEI (Medicare Economic Index) or their actual costs for the year.

If you have any questions about your specific situation, please contact us. We’re here to help.

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Section 130 Rural Health Clinic (RHC) modernization: Highlights

Read this if your agency is involved with COVID-19 vaccination distribution.

Although states have already created COVID-19 vaccination plans, your state can still implement critical strategies to improve your distribution plan. In October 2020, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) released the Interim Playbook version 2.0, providing a key framework for states and jurisdictions to build their COVID-19 vaccine distribution plans. The federal government asked that immunization programs in each state plans based on this model. The Playbook contains 15 sections of planning elements for states to consider in the development of their plan. Completing a plan of this extent while simultaneously trying to manage the pandemic has led some states to leave out or not thoroughly address critical components in their plans. 

The Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) analyzed and collected common themes from each of the 47 state vaccination plans. Their analysis identified areas of weakness in the following areas of each plan: 

  • Priority populations for vaccinations in states 
  • Identifying networks of providers 
  • Developing data collection and reporting
  • Forming communication strategies

Each of the four areas each contained multiple findings, but since the vaccine has already started to roll out, some aspects of the plan cannot be revised. However, it is not too late to improve upon certain elements, especially for data collection and reporting, as well as communication strategies. 

The following recommendations for improvement of state plans are based on the findings from the KFF State COVID-19 vaccine distribution analysis report

States should identify a clear data reporting and collection plan that accounts for the COVID-19-specific data requirements.

According to KFF, an immunization registry or database has been included in 53% of the state COVID-19 plans; in the others it was an unclear component of the plan. The data collection process for COVID-19 vaccinations will be complex and unique due to a number of factors including the nature of a phased rollout, new provider enrollment and onboarding, storage requirements, multiple vaccines and doses, and off-site vaccination locations

Since a little over half of all states have arranged for either new systems or are developing or adding features to current immunization registries, states that are lacking a comprehensive approach could benefit from adopting elements present in the other plans. For example, some states detail how their current immunization system is being utilized for the COVID-19 vaccine, in addition to upgrading certain features in order to meet the anticipated increase in demand. 

Other states have also described their transition to the Immunization Gateway, a centralized technical infrastructure sponsored by the CDC Immunization Information Systems Support Branch, and led by the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Chief Technology Officer. The Gateway is securely hosted through the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL). States can review the data collection and reporting sections of other states’ plans to gain a greater understanding of how their plan can be improved by describing data reporting and collection processes.   

States should address racial and ethnic disparities in vaccine distribution and acceptance through targeted and evidence-based communication strategies. 

The KFF analysis of state COVID-19 plans indicated about 49% of state plans include specific mention of racial or ethnic minority populations in regards to communication. Communication plans need to include targeted strategies as minority populations and people of color have shown greater hesitation in receiving the vaccine, even if it is free and determined safe by scientists and federal authorities. The virus has had a disproportionate impact on communities of color and minority populations, and a lack of communication to these populations may continue to enhance these disparate health outcomes.

One way to improve a communication plan by addressing racial or ethnic minority populations would be by incorporating the National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS), specifically the standards for Communication and Language Assistance:

  • Offer language assistance to individuals who have limited English proficiency and/or other communication needs, at no cost to them, to facilitate timely access to all health care and services
  • Inform all individuals of the availability of language assistance services clearly and in their preferred language, verbally and in writing
  • Ensure the competence of individuals providing language assistance, recognizing that the use of untrained individuals and/or minors as interpreters should be avoided
  • Provide easy-to-understand print and multimedia materials and signage in the languages commonly used by the populations in the service area

A communication plan that considers the racial and ethnic minority populations most vulnerable to adverse health outcomes and have shown a lack of trust in the scientific community would be advisable in order to combat disproportionate negative outcomes from the COVID-19 virus in the future. 

A COVID-19 vaccine distribution plan is an important aspect of each state’s strategy to control the spread of the virus. In order to lead to effective vaccine distribution, it is vital for the plans to thoroughly address data collection, reporting, and tracking. It is also important to consider implementing a communication plan that incorporates strategies to reach racial and ethnic minority groups who might have been disproportionality impacted by COVID-19 as a way to improve your state’s health equity approach to COVID-19 vaccination efforts. By implementing these considerations, your state’s COVID-19 vaccine distribution plan could become more effective in improving the health outcomes of your population. 

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Two ways states can improve their COVID-19 vaccination distribution plans

Read this if you are a state Medicaid agency (SMA) or managed care organization (MCO).

Value-based care (VBC) can help stabilize healthcare revenues during times of unexpected challenges and market volatility. Implementing or solidifying value-based payment (VBP) or purchasing arrangements between payers and providers is one pathway to stabilizing provider revenues, especially during the era of COVID-19.

On September 15, 2020, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released a letter to state Medicaid directors (SMDs) on how states can advance VBC across healthcare systems. Earlier in 2020, the CMS Administrator indicated that value-based or capitated payments can help promote provider resiliency, allowing providers to focus on quality of care as opposed to increasing utilization for short-term reimbursement gains. 

Promoting the adoption of VBC in Medicaid managed care is a long-term strategy to create stable and predictable revenues for providers, and potentially critical to successfully react to market disruptions caused by COVID-19. Providers are encouraged or obligated to see patients to drive quality outcomes, receiving VBPs or capitation that shifts revenue streams away from traditional fee-for-service models. VBP arrangements focus on quality of care, and can promote beneficiary health while reducing total costs.

A roadmap to advancing VBP in Medicaid

As healthcare costs continue to increase, states, payers, and providers have started transitioning to VBC to reimburse services based upon particular conditions (e.g., diabetes), Episodes of Care (EOC) (e.g., pregnancy and delivery), or different population healthcare needs (e.g., immunizations and well-child visits). VBP arrangements can incentivize the delivery of healthcare innovations that prioritize care coordination and quality outcomes over volume of services rendered, and help to avoid waste and duplication of services. VBP seeks to incentivize providers based on performance, and can result in shared savings for both providers and healthcare payers.

While many states have made significant progress moving towards VBP arrangements in their Medicaid managed care programs, data from the Health Care Payment Learning and Action Network (HCP-LAN) indicates there is still opportunity for improvement. In 2018, 90% of Medicare payments were made through a VBP arrangement, yet only 34% of Medicaid payments were made through VBP.  

Through its recent guidance, CMS provides a roadmap, strategies, and alternative payment methodology frameworks for states and health plans to implement successful VBP models in collaboration with the provider community. Key considerations for successful VBP implementation include:

  • Defining level and scope of financial risk, and developing associated performance benchmarks
  • Selecting established quality metrics that incentivize provider performance without undue administrative burden
  • Encouraging multi-payer participation (e.g., Medicaid managed care, Medicare, commercial health plans) to align provider incentives across payers and delivery systems
  • Advancing Health Information Technology (HIT) capabilities across providers and delivery systems
  • Assessing health plan and provider/delivery system readiness
  • Promoting stakeholder engagement and transparency
  • Developing VBC programs focusing on sustainability

Regarding HIT and the exchange of data between providers, MCOs, and SMAs, CMS recommends states take advantage of the Advanced Planning Document (APD) process to request 90/10 funding to address technology infrastructure needs associated to help implement a robust VBC program and help ensure delivery system readiness. Facilitating data sharing and promoting real-time and reliable data transactions between payers and providers engaged in VBC is critical to measurement, monitoring, and programmatic success. Additionally, SMAs can leverage VBP arrangements to focus on areas of waste in the healthcare system, including care delivery, and care coordination. 

If you would like more information or have questions about VBC and guidance on assessing, developing or implementing changes to your managed care program, please contact us. We also offer services related to value-based payment, as detailed here. We’re here to help.

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Value-based care to increase provider and delivery system resiliency

Read this if you are a director or manager at a Health and Human Services agency in charge of modernizing your state's Health and Human Services systems. 

When states start to look at outdated Health and Human Services systems like Eligibility Systems or Medicaid Enterprise Systems, they spend a lot of time on strategic planning efforts and addressing technology deficiencies that set the direction for their agencies. While they pay a lot of attention to the technology aspects of the work, they often overlook others. Here are three to pay attention to: 

  1. Business process improvement
  2. Organization development
  3. Organizational change management

Including these important steps in strategic planning often improves the likelihood of an implementation of Health and Human Service systems that provide the fully intended value or benefit to the citizen they help serve. When planning major system improvements, agencies need to have the courage to ask other critical questions that, when answered, will help guarantee greater success upon implementation of modernized system.

Don’t forget, it’s not only about new technology—it’s about gaining efficiencies in your business processes, structuring your organization in a manner that supports business process improvements, and helping the people in your organization and external stakeholders accept change.  

Business process improvement 

When thinking about improving business processes, a major consideration is to identify what processes can be improved to save time and money, and deliver services to those in need faster. When organizations experience inefficiencies in their business processes, more often than not the underlying processes and systems are at fault, not the people. Determining which processes require improvement can be challenging. However, analyzing your business processes is a key factor in strategic planning, understanding the challenges in existing processes and their underlying causes, and developing solutions to eliminate or mitigate those causes are essential to business process improvement.

Once you pinpoint areas of process improvement, you can move forward with reviewing your organization, classifying needs for potential organization development, and begin developing requirements for the change your organization needs.

Organization development

An ideal organizational structure fully aligns with the mission, vision, values, goals, and strategy of an organization. One question to ask when considering the need for organization development is, “What does your organization need to look like to support your state’s to-be vision?” Answering this question can provide a roadmap that helps you achieve:

  1. Improved outcomes for vulnerable populations, such as those receiving Medicaid, TANF, SNAP, or other Health and Human Services benefits 
  2. Positive impacts on social determinants of health in the state
  3. Significant cost savings through a more leveraged workforce and consolidated offices with related fixed expenses—and turning focus to organizational change management

Organization development does not stop at reviewing an organization’s structure. It should include reviewing job design, cultural changes, training systems, team design, and human resource systems. Organizational change is inherent in organization development, which involves integration of a change management strategy. When working through organization development, consideration of the need for organizational change should be included in both resource development and as part of the cultural shift.

Organizational change management

Diverging from the norm can be an intimidating prospect for many people. Within your organization, you likely have diverse team members who have different perspectives about change. Some team members will be willing to accept change easily, some will see the positive outcomes from change, but have reservations about learning a new way of approaching their jobs, and there will be others who are completely resistant to change. 

Successful organizational change management happens by allowing team members to understand why the organization needs to change. Leaders can help staff gain this understanding by explaining the urgency for change that might include:

  • Aging technology: Outdated systems sometimes have difficulty transmitting data or completing simple automated tasks.
  • Outdated processes: “Because we’ve always done it this way” is a red flag, and a good reason to examine processes and possibly help alleviate stressors created by day-to-day tasks. It might also allow your organization to take care of some vital projects that had been neglected because before there wasn’t time to address them as a result of outdated processes taking longer than necessary.
  • Barriers to efficiency: Duplicative processes caused by lack of communication between departments within the organization, refusal to change, or lack of training can all lead to less efficiency.

To help remove stakeholder resistance to change and increase excitement (and adoption) around new initiatives, you must make constant communication and training an integral component of your strategic plan. 

Investing in business process improvement, organization development, and organizational change management will help your state obtain the intended value and benefits from technology investments and most importantly, better serve citizens in need. 

Does your organization have interest in learning more about how to help obtain the fully intended value and benefits from your technology investments? Contact our Health and Human Services consulting team to talk about how you can incorporate business process improvement, organization development, and organizational change management activities into your strategic planning efforts.

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People and processes: Planning health and human services IT systems modernization to improve outcomes

Read this if you are a member of a State Medicaid Agency’s leadership team.

Another National Association of Medicaid Directors (NAMD) fall conference is in the books. As usual, the sessions were excellent. And this year we had the luxury of being able to attend from the comfort of our homes. For BerryDunn’s consulting group, that enabled us to “send” a broader team to conference. On the flip side, it also meant we were not able to greet and meet our community in person. 

Matt Salo, the NAMD Executive Director, defined the underlying themes to the conference as Flexibility, Innovation, and Resilience. If one were to just look at the full agenda, it would be hard to tell that this was a virtual conference. The session schedule and opening reception looked very much like a traditional NAMD conference, although there were not the usual breaks with the ice cream jubilee and ballroom number assignments. Otherwise, it was business as usual. 

In checking in with State Medicaid Director attendees, Monday’s meetings went well and they appreciated coming together. State leadership across the country is working straight-out right now—seven days a week. It kind of reminds me of when I became a parent: I thought I knew how to handle sleep deprivation, and then I had a newborn, and realized the important work of parenting isn’t on a time clock, which is much like the work Medicaid agencies are dedicated to. The directors and their support staff’s commitment to serving members and tax payers in their respective states is inspiring, and we are privileged to work alongside them. 

I appreciated a subtle but deep reminder from Matt and the NAMD President Beth Kidder for us: remember our “true North.” Why are we here? What is our purpose as leaders and vendors in the Medicaid community? The work we do matters. We can improve lives. We can save lives. The members in Medicaid programs are the center of all we do. Here are some of the other highlights I absorbed during the conference. 

Plenary sessions

In Tuesday’s plenary, panelists shared their primary lessons and reflections on the year, including: 

  • Pace―we need a balance because the pandemic does not have a clear beginning or end. Pandemics do not simply blow over like a hurricane; it’s hard to tell the beginning, middle, and end. 
  • Steadiness in chaos: velocity and stability―leaders need to make timely decisions while also being an anchor for their teams. 
  • Prioritization―not everything needs an immediate response. We need to be deliberate about what we do. 
  • Roadmaps―we can still use the tools we created map out where we want to go. 

The panel also shared how telehealth, transparency, teamwork, focus, and reflecting on “whole lives” in policy making assisted them in navigating their teams and providing the best services possible. 

Keynote―health equity 

Dayna Bowen Matthew provided a solid argument on how Medicaid can be key to achieving true health equity in America. She discussed the four “Ps” that can make this possible: Population, Position, Payer, and Persuader. She used the COVID-19 pandemic as her example of how it hit the vulnerable population first, and how we could have learned from it. 

Instead, it is being unleashed on the broader population. The work must begin with us, expand to our teams, policies we can control, and then policies that need a collaborative approach to change and implement. If you attended the conference and have access but missed this talk, I highly recommend listening to it as she covered a lot of very pertinent material. 

Member perspectives 

Sprinkled through the entire conference were videos of Medicaid members’ perspectives. I appreciate the tradition of bringing the human element of Medicaid’s impact into the conference, as it reminds us of our purpose. The perspectives also underscore another important theme of Matt’s: “Medicaid is a program about people, not statistics.” Examples of stories we heard include how someone went from 28 years of incarceration due to an armed robbery conviction to graduating from a university and now working with people; a hockey coach’s accident that paralyzed him from the neck down; a homeless mother gaining security and stability; a foster parent with a son having a rare brittle bone disease and a Native American parent with health access issues. 

Economy 

There were a couple of sessions related the economy, and generally, the presenters thought the biggest impact to Medicaid is yet to come. They said that there is typically a lag between events and member enrollments and the surge is still coming. They also agreed there was strong federal support from outside of CMS that kept their enrollment down. Membership growth is likely coming as state budgets are constrained. There are hopes for additional federal assistance within Medicaid, including an extended FMAP, and a similar package from last spring. The lack of certainty in regards to consistent funding is causing the states to spend a lot of energy developing back up plans. 

The panelists think the biggest economic challenges are yet to come is based upon three main reasons: the high chance of a recession, the impending (third wave) virus impact, and the social unrest exacerbated by the pandemic and systemic racism. These are merging perfect storms causing directors to look for stability and relief. I think the best summary I heard of how to proceed was open the book of “good ideas for bad times” that were not well thought of during good times. 

Public health emergency―COVID-19 pandemic 

As would be expected, COVID was a recurring topic in almost every session. There was a very interesting panel discussion on how best to “unwind” the changes made once we arrive in the post-pandemic era. There will be lots of challenges, and it is worth discussing these now, while we are still in the midst of responding to the immediate needs to address the virus. We are aware there will be systemic and program reversals. However, it will not be as simple as just doing a rollback. States will need to develop their strategies for redeterminations of their member populations and the timing will need to be coordinated. CMS will need to prepare guidance on expectations for unwinding. Programs will need to be reviewed and decisions prioritized on what needs to be changed. 

Prior to getting to post-pandemic era, states know they will need to plan for managing vaccine distribution, which will be one tool to help bring the curve down. According to former senior officials from the Trump and Obama administrations, the worst pandemic phase is coming this winter. However, there is “light at the end of the tunnel” because of optimism on a vaccine and other tools. We know more in this upcoming wave than the first wave in March. According to these officials, the sciences cannot get us through without a human element. And the human element can save a lot of lives. 

As Scott Gottlieb, MD, former FDA Commissioner, said, “We just need to stop breathing on each other.” He was implying that we need to socially distance and wear masks, while we wait for the vaccine come around and be distributed. The challenge is, according to Andy Slavitt, Former Acting Administrator for CMS, that the vaccine will not be available to the majority of the population for two to three months, and by then, if humans do not continue to change behavior, the spread could go to 30-40% of the population. They predict the pandemic will be at its worst point when the vaccine is made available. 

Seema Verma, the CMS Administrator, said the PHE has shown that we have the ability to work faster. She wants to ensure we heed the lessons of the pandemic, and in particular the experiences with the spread and deaths in the nursing homes. She feels that the issues in the nursing facilities cannot be fixed at the federal level. She sees CMS’s role is to encourage innovation at the state level, while the federal government hold states accountable to costs and positive outcomes and quality. 

Other concerns panelists raised regarding the pandemic are the long-term and downstream ripple effects of responding to the pandemic. For example: 

  • States know their members have delayed, deferred, and simply foregone healthcare over these past several months. This will create a surge in treatment at a later date, causing increased demand to an already fatigued provider community.
  • The reduced health of the general population resulting from not receiving the right care now and delaying care will further harm the well-being of the population. 
  • Our education system has gone mostly online, adversely impacting students’ ability to learn. 
  • The overall mental health of our population is at risk—the pandemic has changed all of us, and we will learn to what extent it is harmed us over the next several years. 

Looking ahead―there is hope

Several of the panels spent time discussing what our future might look like. It was encouraging to hear how there is a vision for long-term care delivery changes, meeting behavioral health needs, emergency and pandemic preparedness approaches, and addressing workforce challenges and healthcare inequalities. When asked to name one or two words that will represent where we are in five years, the panelists said: 

  • Lead and Succeed (#leadandsucceed) 
  • Survive and Thrive (#surviveandthrive) 
  • Even Better Together (#evenbettertogether)

We are in this today, and we are together, keeping the eye on our “true North”. Doing so will help us remain together and make us stronger in the future. The key is that we remain together. The conference showed that even though we could not be together in the same geographic place, our minds, attention, and spirit are aligned. We experienced the spirit of NAMD from our homes. 

We know that the future holds opportunities for us to be physically together in the future. We missed being in DC this year, and are very hopeful we will see you next year. That will be icing on the cake, which we will savor and not take for granted. Until then, I am confident we will maintain our integrity and focus on our purpose. 
 

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NAMD 2020 reflections: Together towards the future

Read this if you are in a management role at a state Medicaid agency.

States are facing unique pressure on resources and budgets due to the COVID-19 pandemic, coupled with potential uncertainty following an election year. Healthcare innovation and transformation is one route state Medicaid agencies (SMAs) may take to minimize operational costs and improve access to services. Here are some tactics, flexibilities, and practical steps to help realize innovation during this time.

US Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis is credited in 1932 with popularizing the phrase that states are the “laboratories of democracy”. In this case, Medicaid may be the ‘laboratory of health policy and innovation", in part as state Medicaid and Children’s Insurance Programs (CHIP) are collectively the largest US healthcare payer, covering 74 million individuals.

In 2020, states have faced the dual challenge of a public health emergency and corresponding state budget uncertainty, squeezing resources just as projected state revenues have dramatically shrunk. SMAs must be creative to meet competing priorities: administering their programs while responding to the public health emergency. Here are some tactics, flexibilities, and practical steps to help realize innovation during this time. 

Reimagining funding for state Medicaid agencies

Identifying a source of funding is often challenging. Three options to consider include:

  1. Advance Planning Documents (APDs)
    While strictly for information systems, APDs can unlock 90/10 match for Development, Design, and Implementation (DDI) or a 75/25 match for operations. This funding is above most state Federal Medical Assistance Percentages (FMAPs). Realistically, program changes generally require system changes too. Consider reviewing whether you could tie the initiative to Medicaid Information Technology Architecture (MITA) business process maturity and/or outcomes-based system certification criteria. Linking personnel, training, project management, and any equipment for system needs into an APD can be an effective way to help fund the process and system changes.
  2. Partnerships
    An SMA can look further afield if sister agencies have funds available. This is especially true if braiding federal payment streams is an option. For example, many developments that benefit Medicaid can also help CHIP. The federal matching rate for state CHIP programs is typically about 15 percentage points higher than the Medicaid matching rate.  
  3. Certified Public Expenditures (CPE)
    Under 42 CFR § 433.51 and the Social Security Act, another governmental entity besides the SMA can contribute state matches allowing the state to draw Federal Financial Participation (FFP). One option can be another governmental entity using state dollars at the state, county, or even local level, to deliver health services (if covered under the Medicaid state plan) to Medicaid members.  

Interagency cooperation to generate savings in the health and human service (HHS) space will be the topic of a forthcoming article.

Getting help: Communications planning and the role of project management

As SMAs pursue more complex initiatives such as addressing Social Determinants of Health (SDoH)—collaborating not just with providers but with other public agencies, community organizations, vendors, federal partners, advocacy groups, and health systems—the need to coordinate such a diverse circle of stakeholders increases. Demonstration projects, system implementation efforts, and major healthcare initiatives in particular, require coordination of stakeholders throughout each project phase.

Health and human services (HHS) organizations sometimes underestimate the role of project management. For example, project management is often seen as simply “making sure things are complete” by the deadline, but there are other advantages such as establishing efficiency, improving the quality of service delivery, controlling costs, and better coordinating staff for the SMA. With stretched public workforces and more tasks in the current business environment, you want to get as much done—preferably faster, cheaper, and with less risk—and deliver the expected benefits. 

Guidance on priorities from senior leadership can help organizations establish clear and visible sponsorship to help establish success. Strategic change needs a strong champion within the SMA who has the ability to convene key stakeholders and keep projects on task.

Procuring the tools

After determining funding and before executing a project, you prepare by getting the tools you need—whether tools that involve systems, subject matter experts, or general project assistance.  If the Request for Proposal (RFP) process is not an option, consider whether a pre-qualified vendor list or cooperative contract vehicle would work for you. Cooperative contracts are increasingly popular at the federal, state, and local levels. A few cooperative options include:

The solution is strategy

Keeping Medicaid innovation moving forward requires strategic focus that combines funding, communications, project management, and procurement. The strategy you develop can help the outcome of the initiative to be greater than the sum of its parts. By using all available tools, including those discussed here, your SMA can prioritize innovation.

Next steps

  • Evaluate your program and identify initiatives to prioritize in the coming year. Ask your CMS contact about the latest applicable guidance. 
  • Develop APDs to help fund technology needs for initiatives, along with training your SMA team and providers. 
  • Implement a communications management approach to engage stakeholders.
  • Marshal project management resources and develop a realistic and achievable roadmap to success.   
  • Explore agency contracting vehicles, cooperative contracts, and other procurements tools. 

We’re here to help. If you have more questions or want to have an in-depth conversation about your specific situation, please contact the Medicaid consulting team
 

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The solution to help Medicaid innovation moving forward