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The people component: Why higher education institutions should focus on staff when implementing an ERP system

11.20.17

The relationship between people, processes, and technology is as elemental as earth—and older than civilization. From the first sharpened rock to the Internet of Things, the three have been crucially intertwined and interdependent. There would have been no Industrial Revolution, for instance, without entrepreneurs who developed new tools to facilitate new manufacturing methods.

Of course, the increasing complexity of processes and the rapid innovations in technology tend to eclipse the present role that people play in progress. On the surface the trend seems understandable, even reasonable, when it comes to implementing a new Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system. Implementing a new ERP system is one of the most daunting projects an institution can undertake. Some sobering statistics—over 70% of all implementations take longer than planned, while over 50% go over budget—illustrate why many institutions focus on selecting the right ERP model and purchasing the right software. This is important, yet there are two excellent and connected reasons why your institution should focus on the “people component” of an ERP implementation.

Reason #1: The Technology is Tenable

Companies have improved and vetted ERP systems over time, so that today there’s little chance your institution will purchase poorly designed ERP software. And you have multiple options. For example, you could pursue a hosted ERP model in which a data center houses your ERP system, or a Software as a Service (SaaS) model, in which a third party administers your ERP software. These options help minimize hardware implementation, maintenance, and incomplete attempts at full system utilization—which in turn saves you time, money, and headaches.

In short: You won’t have to bear the full brunt of the tech burden, and the software and hardware you purchase should work. This enables you to concentrate on the people component of the system.

Reason #2: People Propel the Processes

A higher education institution can optimize an ERP system to complete countless processes: automating registration, onboarding staff, processing financial aid, improving self-service capabilities, simplifying record-keeping, etc. Yet a system can’t do all this on its own (not yet, at least). People—both functional and IT staff—propel these processes. For this to happen, your institution needs to secure buy-in and equip people with vision, training, and resources.

People are wary of ERP projects, for good reason. When an institution decides to tackle an ERP implementation the onus often falls on already busy staff, some of whom may rather find a new career than manage a new system implementation. Your staff and their institutional knowledge are your greatest assets. It is important to empower staff to define how future-state business processes should work—and for you to remember that a common reason for ERP implementation failure is lack of engagement. Sometimes, those at the executive level make decisions without adequate input from the people who actually do the work. You will need to sharpen your “people skills” in order to educate stakeholders on the value of a new ERP system, and how the software will make their day-to-day roles and responsibilities more efficient and effective. To ensure that staff have the bandwidth to engage in this change, it is advisable to provide backfill for key administrative functions.

Designing business processes of a future-state system is arguably the most challenging part of an ERP implementation. Often, stakeholders don’t understand the new functionality that a future system can offer because they have only used the prior system. It is important to engage the ERP vendor early and educate your staff to ensure that they understand the possibilities when designing future-state processes.

Once you have designed processes, training should take center stage. And once again, people play a pivotal role in this process. Modern ERP systems usually require staff to fundamentally conduct business differently; this can require training not only on the new system, but also on other foundational technologies (e.g., the office suite) not relied upon before. It is important to identify these needs and incorporate them into your institution’s training plan up front.

An effective training plan needs to balance multiple types of training, ranging from formal classroom sessions to online learning and train-the-trainer sessions. Tech-savvy staff will be able to train other staff in using the new ERP system, which will not only increase the skill sets of said staff, but will also help them better understand how their roles fit within the larger picture of the institution. This, in turn, will organically improve communication and workflow, as well as lead to more collaboration and teamwork. The result: positive institution-wide change.

Moving Forward

Think about your institution’s focus when implementing a new ERP system—and be aware of the benefits that it could have for your staff, your students, and your bottom line. You will face other ERP-related challenges, such as selecting the right third-party vendor and facilitating change management. If you’d like to discuss some strategies for tackling these challenges, this process is easy—just send me an email.

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Read this if you are planning for, or are in the process of implementing a new software solution.

User Acceptance Testing (UAT) is more than just another step in the implementation of a software solution. It can verify system functionality, increase the opportunity for a successful project, and create additional training opportunities for your team to adapt to the new software quickly. Independent verification through a structured user acceptance plan is essential for a smooth transition from a development environment to a production environment. 

Verification of functionality

The primary purpose of UAT is to verify that a system is ready to go live. Much of UAT is like performing a pre-flight checklist on an aircraft. Wings... check, engines... check, tires... check. A structured approach to UAT can verify that everything is working prior to rolling out a new software system for everyone to use. 

To hold vendors accountable for their contractual obligations, we recommend an agency test each functional and technical requirement identified in the statement of work portion of their contract. 

It is also recommended that the agency verify the functional and technical requirements that the vendor replied positivity to in the RFP for the system you are implementing. 

Easing the transition to a new software

Operational change management (OCM) is a term that describes a methodology for making the switch to a new software solution. Think of implementing a new software solution like learning a new language. For some employees, the legacy software solution is the only way they know how to do their job. Like learning a new language, changing the way business and learning a new software can be a challenging and scary task. The benefits outweigh the anxiety associated with learning a new language. You can communicate with a broader group of people, and maybe even travel the world! This is also true for learning a new software solution; there are new and exciting ways to perform your job.

Throughout all organizations there will be some employees resistant to change. Getting those employees involved in UAT can help. By involving them in testing the new system and providing feedback prior to implementation, they will feel ownership and be less likely to resist the change. In our experience, some of the most resistant employees, once involved in the process, become the biggest champions of the new system.  

Training and testing for better results

On top of the OCM and verification benefits a structured UAT can accomplish, UAT can be a great training opportunity. An agency needs to be able to perform actions of the tested functionality. For example, if an agency is testing a software’s ability to import a document, then a tester needs to be trained on how to do that task. By performing this task, the tester learns how to login to the software, navigate the software, and perform tasks that the end user will be accomplishing in their daily use of the new software. 

Effective UAT and change management

We have observed agencies that have installed software that was either not fully configured or the final product was not what was expected when the project started. The only way to know that software works how you want is to test it using business-driven scenarios. BerryDunn has developed a UAT process, customizable to each client, which includes a UAT tracking tool. This process and related tool helps to ensure that we inspect each item and develop steps to resolve issues when the software doesn’t function as expected. 

We also incorporate change management into all aspects of a project and find that the UAT process is the optimal time to do so. Following established and proven approaches for change management during UAT is another opportunity to optimize implementation of a new software solution. 

By building a structured approach to UAT, you can enjoy additional benefits, as additional training and OCM benefits can make the difference between forming a positive or a negative reaction to the new software. By conducting a structured and thorough UAT, you can help your users gain confidence in the process, and increase adoption of the new software. 

Please contact the team if you have specific questions relating to your specific needs, or to see how we can help your agency validate the new system’s functionality and reduce resistance to the software. We’re here to help.   
 

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User Acceptance Testing: A plan for successful software implementation

The BerryDunn Recovery Advisory Team has compiled this guide to COVID-19 consulting resources for state and local government agencies and higher education institutions.

We have provided a list of our consulting services related to data analysis, CARES Act funding and procurement, and legislation and policy implementation. Many of these services can be procured via the NASPO ValuePoint Procurement Acquisition Support Services contract.

READ THE GUIDE NOW

We're here to help.
If you have any questions, please contact us at info@berrydunn.com

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COVID-19 consulting resources

Read this if you are a CIO, CFO, Provost, or President at a higher education institution.

In my conversations with CIO friends over the past weeks, it is obvious that the COVID-19 pandemic has forced a lot of change for institutions. Information technology is the underlying foundation for supporting much of this change, and as such, IT leaders face a variety of new demands now and into the future. Here are important considerations going forward.

Swift impact to IT and rapid response

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on higher education. At the onset of this pandemic, institutions found themselves quickly pivoting to work from home (WFH), moving to remote campus operations, remote instruction within a few weeks, and in some cases, a few days. Most CIOs I spoke with indicated that they were prepared, to some extent, thanks to Cloud services and online class offerings already in place—it was mostly a matter of scaling the services across the entire campus and being prepared for returning students and faculty on the heels of an extended spring break.

Services that were not in place required creative and rapid deployment to meet the new demand. For example, one CIO mentioned the capability to have staff accept calls from home. The need for softphones to accommodate student service and helpdesk calls at staff homes required rapid purchase, deployment, and training.

Most institutions have laptop loan programs in place but not scaled to the size needed during this pandemic. Students who choose to attend college on campus are now forced to attend school from home and may not have the technology they need. The need for laptop loans increased significantly. Some institutions purchased and shipped laptops directly to students’ homes. 

CIO insights about people

CIOs shared seeing positive outcomes with their staff. Almost all of the CIOs I spoke with mentioned how the pandemic has spawned creativity and problem solving across their organizations. In some cases, past staffing challenges were put on hold as managers and staff have stepped up and engaged constructively. Some other positive changes shared by CIOs:

  • Communication has improved—a more intentional exchange, a greater sense of urgency, and problem solving have created opportunities for staff to get engaged during video calls.
  • Teams focusing on high priority initiatives and fewer projects have yielded successful results. 
  • People feel a stronger connection with each other because they are uniting behind a common purpose.

Perhaps this has reduced the noise that most staff seem to hear daily about competing priorities and incoming requests that seem to never end.

Key considerations and a framework for IT leaders 

It is too early to fully understand the impact on IT during this phase of the pandemic. However, we are beginning to see budgetary concerns that will impact all institutions in some way. As campuses work to get their budgets settled, cuts could affect most departments—IT included. In light of the increased demand for technology, cuts could be less than anticipated to help ensure critical services and support are uninterrupted. Other future impacts to IT will likely include:

  • Support for a longer term WFH model and hybrid options
  • Opportunities for greater efficiencies and possible collaborative agreements between institutions to reduce costs
  • Increased budgets for online services, licenses, and technologies
  • Need for remote helpdesk support, library services, and staffing
  • Increased training needs for collaborative and instructional software
  • Increased need for change management to help support and engage staff in the new ways of providing services and support
  • Re-evaluation of organizational structure and roles to right-size and refocus positions in a more virtual environment
  • Security and risk management implications with remote workers
    • Accessibility to systems and classes 

IT leaders should examine these potential changes over the next three to nine months using a phased approach. The diagram below describes two phases of impact and areas of focus for consideration. 

Higher Education IT Leadership Phases

As IT leaders continue to support their institutions through these phases, focusing on meeting the needs of faculty, staff, and students will be key in the success of their institutions. Over time, as IT leaders move from surviving to thriving, they will have opportunities to be strategic and create new ways of supporting teaching and learning. While it remains to be seen what the future holds, change is here. 

How prepared are you to support your institution? 

If we can help you navigate through these phases, have perspective to share, or any questions, please contact us. We’re here to help.

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COVID-19: Key considerations for IT leaders in Higher Ed

Read this if you are an IT Leader, CFO, COO, or other C-suite leader responsible for selecting a new system.

Vendor demonstrations are an important milestone in the vendor selection process. Demonstrations allow you to validate what a vendor’s software is capable of, evaluate the usability with your own eyes, and confirm the fit to your organization’s objectives.

Our client found itself in a situation where, after many months of work developing requirements, issuing a request for proposal, and reviewing vendor proposals they were ready to conduct demonstrations. Despite a governor’s executive order for social distancing and limitations on non-essential travel, our client needed to conduct demonstrations to achieve an important project milestone. This presented an opportunity to help them plan, test, and facilitate remote vendor demonstrations with great success.

This brief case study shares some of the key success factors we found in conducting remote demonstrations and some lessons learned after they were complete.

  1. Prepare 
    Establish a clear agenda, schedule, script, and plan in advance of the demonstrations. This helps keep everyone coordinated throughout the demos.
  2. Test
    It is important to test the vendor’s video conference solution from all locations prior to the demonstrations. We tested with both vendors a week ahead of demos.
  3. Establish Ground Rules
    Establishing ground rules allows the meetings to go better, be more efficient, and stay on time. For example, is a moment of silence a consensus to move on or must you wait for someone to unmute their line to verbally confirm to proceed.
  4. Have clear roles by location
    Clear roles help to facilitate the demonstration. Designated time keepers, scribes, and local facilitators help the demonstration go smoothly, and decreases communication issues.
  5. Be close to the microphone
    Essential common sense, but when you can’t see everyone, loud, clear questions and answers make the demos more effective.
  6. Ask vendors to build in pauses to allow for questions
    Since vendors may not be able to see a hand raised, asking vendors to build specific pauses into their demonstrations allows space for questions to be asked easily.
  7. Do a virtual debrief 
    At the end of each vendor demonstration we had our own videoconferencing meeting set up to facilitate a virtual debrief. This allowed us to capture the evaluation notes of the day prior to the next demo. Planning these in advance and having them on people’s calendars made joining the meetings quick and seamless.

Observations and other lessons learned

Following the remote demonstrations we identified a few observations and lessons learned:

  1. Visibility was better
    By not having everyone crowded into one room, people were able to see the screen and the vendor’s software clearly.
  2. Different virtual platforms required orientation
    We wanted vendors to use the tools they were accustomed to using. This led to us using different products for different demonstrations. This was not insurmountable, but required orientation to get used to their tools at the start of each demo.
  3. Video helped debriefing
    Given the quick planning we did not have video capability from all locations for our virtual debrief. It was helpful to see the people sharing their comments following each demonstration. We will plan for video capabilities at all locations next time.
  4. Having a set order for people to provide feedback helped
    During the first debriefing, we established a set order for people to speak and share their thoughts. This limited talking over each other and allowed everyone to hear the thoughts of their peers clearly.
  5. Be patient with slowness
    For the most part we had successful demos with limited slowness. There were a couple points where slowness was encountered. We remained patient, adjusted the schedule, and in the worst case, added an extra break for people.
  6. Staying engaged takes effort
    Sitting all day on a remote demo and paying attention took effort to stay engaged. Building in specific times for Q&A, calling on people by name, and designing it so it wasn’t eight hours straight of presentation helped with engagement.

Restricted travel in response to COVID-19 has led our clients and our teams to be creative and agile in achieving objectives. The remote demonstrations proved highly successful, accomplished the goals, and met our client’s critical timing milestone. At the end of four days of demos, our client commented that the remote demos were perhaps even better than if they had been conducted onsite. As we look at the long view, we may find that clients prefer remote demonstrations even when social distancing and travel restrictions are lifted.

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Social distancing case study: Hosting remote vendor demonstrations

Read this if you are a State Medicaid Director, State Medicaid Chief Information Officer, State Medicaid Project Manager, or State Procurement Officer—or if you work on a State Medicaid Enterprise System (MES) certification effort.

On October 24, 2019, the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) published the Outcomes-Based Certification (OBC) guidance for the Electronic Visit Verification (EVV) module. Now, CMS is looking to bring the OBC process to the rest of the Medicaid Enterprise. 

The shift from a technical-focused certification to a business outcome-focused approach presents a unique opportunity for states as they begin re-procuring—and certifying—their Medicaid Enterprise Systems (MES).

Once you have defined the scope of your MES project—and know you need to undertake CMS certification—you need to ask “what’s next?” OBC can be a more efficient certification process to secure Federal Financial Participation (FFP).

What does OBC certification entail?

Rethinking certification in terms of business outcomes will require agencies to engage business and operations units at the earliest possible point of the project development process to define the program goals and define what a successful implementation is. One way to achieve this is to consider MES projects in three steps. 

Three steps to OBC evaluation

Step 1: Define outcomes

The first step in OBC planning seems easy enough: define outcomes. But what is an outcome? To answer that, it’s important to understand what an outcome isn’t. An outcome isn’t an activity. Instead, an outcome is the result of the activity. For example, the activity could be procuring an EVV solution. In this instance, an outcome could be that the state has increased the ability to detect fraud, waste, and abuse through increased visibility into the EVV solution.

Step 2: Determine measurements

The second step in the OBC process is to determine what to measure and how exactly you will measure it. Deciding what metrics will accurately capture progress toward the new outcomes may be intuitive and therefore easy to define. For example, a measure might simply be that each visit is captured within the EVV solution.

Increasing the ability to detect fraud, waste, and abuse could simply be measured by the number of cases referred to a Medicaid fraud unit or dollars recovered. However, you may not be able to easily measure that in the short-term. Instead, you may need to determine its measurement in terms of an intermediate goal, like increasing the number of claims checked against new data as a result of the new EVV solution. By increasing the number of checked claims, states can ensure that claims are not being paid for unverified visits. 

Step 3: Frequency and reporting

Finally, the state will need to determine how often to report to measure success. States will need to consider the nuances of their own Medicaid programs and how those nuances fit into CMS’ expectations, including what data is available at what intervals.

OBC represents a fundamental change to the certification process, but it’s important to highlight that OBC isn’t completely unfamiliar territory. There is likely to be some carry-over from the certification process as described in the Medicaid Enterprise Certification Toolkit (MECT) version 2.3. The current Medicaid Enterprise Certification (MEC) checklists serve as the foundation for a more abbreviated set of criteria. New evaluation criteria will look and feel like the criteria of old but are likely to be a fraction of the 741 criteria present in the MECT version 2.3.

OBC offers several benefits to states as you navigate federal certification requirements:

  1. You will experience a reduction in the amount of time, effort, and resources necessary to undertake the certification process. 
  2. OBC refocuses procurement in terms of enhancements to the program, not in new functions. Consequently, states will also be able to demonstrate the benefits that each module brings to the program which can be integral to stakeholder support of each module. 
  3. Early adoption of the OBC process can allow you to play a more proactive role in certification efforts.

Continue to check back for a series of our project case studies. Additionally, if you are considering an OBC effort and have questions, please contact our team. You can read the OBC guidance on the CMS website here
 

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Three steps to outcomes-based certification