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Building a Strong Substance Use Disorder (SUD) 1115 waiver demonstration

07.27.18

Is your state Medicaid agency considering a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Section 1115 Waiver to fight the opioid epidemic in your state? States want the waiver because it provides flexibility to test different approaches to finance and deliver Medicaid services. The skyrocketing prevalence of substance use disorders nationwide calls for such flexibility and innovation to expand existing services for treatment and recovery. Although applying for an 1115 waiver can be daunting, here are some guidelines to help you succeed with implementation.

Be pragmatic
Be honest and pragmatic in planning discussions for the essential resources you need to have in place for a successful implementation. Ask yourselves who and how many people you need to involve to develop and execute each stage. Plan enough time to develop policies and agency protocols, make sure you have the right providers for your members, set provider rates, and then train the providers.

Ask hard questions
Once you identify key requirements to address first in your waiver, ask yourself what elements need to be in place to meet these requirements. Here are elements to consider and questions to answer:

  • Fee-for-service and managed care organization (MCO) rates — new services, such as adult residential treatment services aligned with care standards (e.g., American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM®) levels), may require changes to reimbursement rates. What needs to happen to develop new rates? What obstacles do you anticipate and how will you overcome them?
  • Care standards (e.g., ASAM® levels of care) and training your providers — consider what the levels mean given the range of providers in your state and the services your members receive. What is required to move to these standards? How you will work with providers to ensure adherence, including certification and training? What will this cost?
  • Policy changes — your state’s Medicaid agency will need to revamp and create policies to cover the service expansion and other changes. How will you complete all necessary policy and protocol changes early enough to inform MCO and provider actions?
  • MCO provider network adequacy — it’s worth investing the time in your application development to assess whether the MCOs serving Medicaid recipients in your state have the right mix of providers to ensure that you can fully implement the new service structure. How long should you give the MCOs for network expansion or recruitment?
  • MCO care coordination guidelines — each MCO will have its own approach. How are you going to ensure adherence to your waiver’s vision of care coordination?
  • Indicators — how will you evaluate the success of your program? How will you collect and analyze data? The earlier you determine how you will evaluate your program, the easier it will be to report on, and make improvements.

Get started
Applying for and implementing an SUD 1115 waiver is a complex and time-consuming process — but by dedicating the time up front to address the many details of time and resources, you’ll find implementation to be far smoother, and effective treatment and recovery services provided sooner for those who need it most. Our Medicaid team is here to help.

Topics: MESC 2018, Medicaid

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Truly effective preventive health interventions require starting early, as evidenced by the large body of research and the growing federal focus on the role of Medicaid in addressing Social Determinants of Health (SDoH) and Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs).

Focusing on early identification of SDoH and ACEs, CMS recently announced its Integrated Care for Kids (InCK) model and will release the related Notice of Funding Opportunity this fall.

CMS describes InCK as a child-centered approach that uses community-based service delivery and alternative payment models (APMs) to improve and expand early identification, prevention, and treatment of priority health concerns, including behavioral health issues. The model’s goals are to improve child health, reduce avoidable inpatient stays and out-of-home placement, and create sustainable APMs. Such APMs would align payment with care quality and support provider/payer accountability for improved child health outcomes by using care coordination, case management, and mobile crisis response and stabilization services.

State Medicaid agencies have many things to consider when evaluating this funding opportunity. Building on current efforts and innovations, building or leveraging strong partnerships with community organizations, incentivizing evidence-based interventions, and creating risk stratification of the target population are critical parts of the InCK model. Here are three additional areas to consider:

1. Data. States will need information for early identification of children in the target population. State agencies?like housing, justice, child welfare, education, and public health have this information?and external organizations—such as childcare, faith-based, and recreation groups—are also good sources of early identification. It is immensely complicated to access data from these disparate sources. State Medicaid agencies will be required to support local implementation by providing population-level data for the targeted geographic service area.

  • Data collection challenges include a lack of standardized measures for SDoH and ACEs, common data field definitions, or consistent approaches to data classification; security and privacy of protected health information; and IT development costs.
  • Data-sharing agreements with internal and external sources will be critical for state Medicaid agencies to develop, while remaining mindful of protected health information regulations.
  • Once data-sharing agreements are in place, these disparate data sources, with differing file structures and nomenclature, will require integration. The integrated data must then be able to identify and risk-stratify the target population.

For any evaluative approach or any APM to be effective, clear quality and outcome measures must be developed and adopted across all relevant partner organizations.

2. Eligibility. Reliable, integrated eligibility and enrollment systems are crucial points of identification and make it easier to connect to needed services.

  • Applicants for one-benefit programs should be screened for eligibility for all programs they may need to achieve positive health outcomes.
  • Any agency at which potential beneficiaries appear should also have enrollment capability, so it is easier to access services.

3. Payment models. State Medicaid agencies may cover case management services and/or targeted case management as well as health homes; leverage Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) services; and modify managed care organization contract language to encourage, incent, and in some cases, require services related to the InCK model and SDoH. Value-based payment models, already under exploration in numerous states, include four basic approaches:

  • Pay for performance—provider payments are tied directly to specific quality or efficiency indicators, including health outcomes under the provider organization’s control. 
  • Shared savings/risk—some portion of the organization’s compensation depends on the managed care entity achieving cost savings for the targeted patient population, while realizing specific health outcomes or quality improvement.
  • Pay for success—payment is dependent upon achieving desired outcomes rather than underlying services.
  • Capitated or bundled payments—managed care entities pay an upfront per member per month lump sum payment to an organization for community care coordination activities and link that with fee-for-service reimbursement for delivering value-added services.

By focusing on upstream prevention, comprehensive service delivery, and alternative payment models, the InCK model is a promising vehicle to positively impact children’s health. Though its components require significant thought, strategy, coordination, and commitment from state Medicaid agencies and partners, there are early innovators providing helpful examples and entities with vast Section 1115 waiver development and Medicaid innovation experience available to assist.

As state Medicaid agencies develop and implement primary and secondary prevention, cost savings can be achieved while meaningful improvements are made in children’s lives.

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Three factors state medicaid agencies should consider when applying for InCK funding

Read this if you are a leader at a state Medicaid agency, Long-Term Care Hospital, Rural Health Clinic, Federally Qualified Health Center, or intermediate care facility.

The new fact sheet from CMS provides state and local governments that may be developing alternate care sites with information on how to receive payments for acute inpatient and outpatient care through federal programs, including Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

CMS notes that it is easiest for an existing enrolled hospital or health system to obtain payments through CMS programs for covered health care services furnished at the ACS by treating the ACS as a short-term extension of their current ‘brick-and-mortar’ facilities. 

State and local governments that want to build a hospital ACS have three options if they wish to be paid by CMS for providing covered hospital inpatient and outpatient services:

  1. Transfer operation and billing for care delivered in the ACS to a hospital or health system which is enrolled
  2. Enroll the ACS as a new hospital in CMS programs
  3. As an alternative, instead of making facility payments, enrolled physicians or other non-physician practitioners may bill for covered services that they furnish at the ACS

CMS guidance to states on implementing the optional COVID-19 testing group 

CMS has provided new guidance to states who may be planning to implement the Optional COVID-19 Testing Group, which was established by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) for uninsured individuals in order to furnish COVID-19 testing and associated services.

  • The guidance from CMS outlines the different requirements connected with implementing the uninsured group, inclusive of eligibility and enrollment, data reporting, and claims. 
  • The guidance also describes flexibilities available to help states achieve implementation of the new group and strategies to meet related requirements. 
  • For more information related to the eligibility requirements and the Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) available for coverage, states can also refer to Section B of the FFCRA and Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) posted April 13, 2020.

CMS announces enhanced enforcement actions based on nursing home COVID-19 data and inspection results

Earlier in the month of June, CMS released new guidelines related to enforcement for nursing homes who may have violations of infection control practices.

  • CMS intends to apportion $80 million in CARES Act funding to states in order to increase infection control surveys. With CARES Act funding, states will be required to carry out on-site surveys of nursing homes with previous COVID-19 outbreaks, in addition to nursing homes with newly confirmed cases.
  • CMS will make technical assistance available in support of this effort through Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs) for nursing homes to assist in establishing best practices for infection control.
  • States are required to submit 100% of focused surveys of their nursing homes to CMS by July 31, 2020. It should be noted that submission delays may result in reductions to a state’s Cares Act allocation for FFY 2021.

HHS announces 45-day compliance deadline extension for providers

On May 22, The Department of Health and Human Service (HHS) announced a 45-day extension to the deadline for providers who are receiving payments from the Provider Relief Fund to accept the necessary terms and conditions of the payments.

  • Should providers wish to keep funds—which may have been automatically dispersed—they must agree to the terms and conditions of the Provider Relief Fund.
  • In order to support impacted facilities there is $50 billion in available COVID-19 relief funding for distribution to providers that bill for Medicare beneficiaries.
  • The announcement from HHS gives providers 90 days from the original receipt date of a payment to accept the terms and conditions.  Alternatively, providers may choose to return the funds.

HHS announces $4.9 billion distribution to nursing facilities impacted by COVID-19

HHS has announced it has begun the distribution of additional relief funds to Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs) in order to address ongoing needs related to COVID-19. Such needs include labor, improving testing capacity, and obtaining personal protective equipment as well as additional expenses specifically linked to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • HHS intends to make the fund distributions to SNFs on both a fixed and variable basis. 
  • Each eligible SNF will receive a fixed dissemination of $50,000 in addition to an allotment of $2,500 per bed. All certified SNFs with six or more certified beds will be eligible for this distribution.
  • Recipients of these funds must attest that they will use Provider Relief Fund payments for allowed purposes under the terms and conditions as well as agree to comply with future audit and reporting requirements.

We’re here to help. If you have more questions or want to have an in-depth conversation about your specific situation, please contact the Medicaid consulting team

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CMS releases new guidance on Alternate Care Sites, the optional COVID-19 testing group, and more

Read this if you are an administrator, manager, or director at a Rural Health Clinic (RHC) or Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC).

The following outlines key due dates related to various CARES Act funding streams that you may have received. Updated as of April 27, 2020.

1. Round two of the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) was just signed last week. If you have not applied and plan to do so, please do so ASAP as the funds are likely to be exhausted quickly.
2. Your 12-month budget for the CARES Act funding is due on May 8, 2020. As you prepare your budget, please consider the following:
a. If you were lucky enough to get approved for PPP loans, use these funds first to pay for salaries and wages as they are for eight weeks only.
b. We encourage including federal grant expenses in all budget categories to enable you to take advantage of the flexibility HRSA has provided you by allowing reclassifications between budget categories up to the lesser of 25% of the federal award or $250,000 without asking for prior approval. If you wish to reclassify amounts to a budget category which didn’t previously have federal funds budgeted, you will have to submit a budget revision to HRSA for approval. This guidance applies to your base 330 grant as well. 
c. Remember, if an employee is paid more than $197,300 (Executive II salary level as of January 1, 2020), you can only charge $197,300 to any HRSA grant. This salary limitation does not apply to consultants or contracted employees.
d. Use of these funds is very likely to undergo audits, similar to the ARRA funding a number of years ago, therefore make sure you properly track how you use these funds (audit trail).
e. Have your personnel policies been modified for consistency with any new practices you’ve implemented as a result of the public health emergency (for example, hazard pay, family and sick leave and remote working)?

Click here for a list of HRSA’s examples of the allowable uses of the CARES Act funding.    
 
3. The initial distribution you received on April 20, 2020 from the CARES Act Provider Relief Fund has an attestation due on May 10, 2020. There are various provisions governing the use of the funds and we suggest you consider the ability to use these funds to offset lost earnings so you do not have to complete with the other funding programs you have received.

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CARES Act funding deadlines: Update for FQHCs and RHCs

Read this is if you are at a healthcare organization and considering telehealth options. 

Given the COVID-19 emergency declaration, telehealth service regulations have been greatly modified to provide flexibility and payment. The guidance on telehealth is very dispersed and can be difficult to navigate. Here are some FAQs based on the many questions we have received. If you have questions related to your specific situation, please contact us. We're here to help.

UPDATED: Are RHCs and FQHCs now eligible as distant site providers for telehealth services? If so, how will they be paid by Medicare?
Yes, the CARES Act includes RHCs and FQHCs as distant sites during the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency (PHE). Distant site telehealth services can be provided by any health care practitioner of the RHC or FQHC within their scope of practice. The practitioners can provide any distant site telehealth service that is approved as a distant site telehealth service under the Physician Fee Schedule (PFS) and from any location, including from the practitioner’s home. CMS has approved an interim payment rate of $92 for RHCs and FQHCs for these services. The rate is based on the average payment for all PFS telehealth services, weighted by the volume of those services paid under the PFS. This rate will apply for services furnished between January 27, 2020 and June 30, 2020. Modifier “95” must be included on the claim. In July 2020, these claims will be automatically reprocessed and be paid at the RHC all-inclusive rate (AIR) and the FQHC prospective payment system (PPS) rate. Reprocessing will begin when the Medicare claims processing system is updated for the new payment rate.

For telehealth distant site services furnished between July 1, 2020 and the end of the COVID-19 PHE, RHCs and FQHCs will need to use RHC/FQHC specific G code, G2025, for services provided via telehealth. These claims will be paid at the $92 rate, not the AIR or PPS rates. If the COVID-19 PHE continues beyond December 31, 2020, the $92 will be updated based on the 2021 PFS average payment rate for these services, again weighted by the volume of those services.

For services in which the coinsurance is waived, RHCs and FQHCs must put the “CS” modifier on the service line. RHC and FQHC claims with the “CS” modifier will be paid with the coinsurance applied, and the Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC) will automatically reprocess these claims beginning on July 1. Coinsurance should not be collected from beneficiaries if the coinsurance is waived.

UPDATED: Will telehealth visits of any kind affect my FQHC or RHC encounter rate?
Costs associated with telehealth will not affect the prospective payment system rate for FQHCs or the all-inclusive rate calculation for RHCs, but the costs will need to be reported on the cost report. Costs of originating and distant site telehealth services will be reported as follows:

  • Form CMS-222-17 on line 79 (Cost Other Than RHC Services) of Worksheet A for RHCs
  • Form CMS-224-14 on line 66 (Other FQHC Services) of Worksheet A for FQHCs.

What is telehealth versus telemedicine?
Telemedicine refers to a remote clinical service while telehealth is a broader term that embodies a consumer-based approach to medical care, incorporating both delivery of care and education of patients.

UPDATED: What types of service levels are available?
There are three main types of Medicare virtual services with different payment levels. Here are the key things to know for each type:

Telehealth visits

  1. These are considered the same as in-person visits and paid at the same PFS rates as regular, in-person visits.
  2. Pre-existing patient relationship requirements have been waived.
  3. The patient originating site can be any healthcare facility or the patient’s home.

Virtual check-ins

  1. These are brief communications in a variety of technology-based manners.
  2. They do require the patient to initiate and consent to the check-in.
  3. It cannot be preceded by a medical visit within the previous 7 days and cannot lead to a medical visit within the next 24 hours. 
  4. A pre-existing relationship with the patient is required.
  5. Common billing codes include HCPCS code G2012 (telephone) and G2010 (captured video or images).

E-visits:

  1. These also need to be initiated by the patient in order to be billable and would be conducted using online patient portals (no face-to-face), for example.
  2. A pre-existing relationship with the patient is required.
  3. Common billing codes include CPT codes 99421-99423 and HCPCS codes G2061-G2063. 

The payment rate for these services will be $24.76 beginning March 1, 2020, through the end of the PHE, instead of the CY 2020 rate of $13.53, and should be billed using code G0071. MACs will automatically reprocess any claims with G00771 furnished on or after March 1, 2020, that were not paid at the new rate.

What codes can be billed as telehealth services?
Here is the listing effective as of March 1, 2020. 

Since this time, 85 additional codes have been added. Click here for the list. 

Do we need to request an 1135 waiver or are these changes covered by a blanket waiver from CMS?
A blanket waiver is in effect, retroactive to March 1, 2020 though the end of the emergency declaration. 

Is patient consent required?
Yes, patients must verbally consent to services. This includes brief telecommunications (which currently have a cost share for Medicare). We recommend it for all payers as a best practice.

Is there additional information expected from Medicare?
Yes, Medicare, Medicaid, and other payers are continually updating their guidance. 

What can we bill for telehealth services for Medicaid and insurance carriers?
This is the most problematic to track as it is continually evolving and every state and carrier is different. Providers must understand each payor’s requirements around audio and video, allowable CPT/HCPCS codes, modifiers, and place of service codes. As you have questions, please reach out to us so we can be sure to provide the most current answer.

Resources
Given how quickly information related to telehealth is changing, please feel free to contact us for the latest resources. 

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Telehealth FAQs

Read this if you work at a public health department and would like a brief summary of how you can maximize funding and meet new federal requirements.

Unpacking the trillions

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, several pieces of legislation were passed by congress and signed into law. The three bills, H.R. 6074 Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act, H.R. 6201 Families First Coronavirus Response Act, and H.R. 748 Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, have provided funding for various federal agencies with different roles in responding to the crisis. Because of the urgency required, much of the guidance for use of funds and reporting requirements were released after passage of the bills or have yet to be released.

Here is a brief timeline and summary of the acts:

Implication and next steps for state public health departments

While little guidance has been provided for how state public health departments should prepare to access federal funds, BerryDunn will continue to monitor and release updates as they become available. 

While at this point HR 6074 has the greatest implications for public health departments, here are some actions that states should take now for their public health programs from the recent legislation:

  1. H.R. 6074: Provides appropriations to the CDC to be allocated to states for COVID-19 expenses.
    • To ensure maximum funding, prepare a spend plan to submit to CDC.
    • To ensure compliance, provide CDC with copies or access to COVID-19 data collected with these funds.
    • To maximize the impact of new funding, develop a COVID-19 community intervention plan.
    • To support streamlined operations, submit revised work plans to CDC.
    • To prevent missed deadlines, submit any requests for deadline extensions to the CDC.
  2. H.R. 6201: Provides guidance specific to the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) programs.
    • To encourage social distancing and loosen administrative requirements, seek waivers through the USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS).
    • To ensure compliance, prepare to submit a report summarizing the use of waivers on population outcomes by March 2021.
  3. H.R. 748: Allocates $150 billion to a coronavirus relief fund for state, local, and tribal governments.
  • To secure funding, monitor the US Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) for guidance on using funds for:
    • Coronavirus prevention and preparation
    • Tools to build health data infrastructure
    • COVID-19 Public Health Emergency expenses
    • Developing countermeasures and vaccines for coronavirus
    • Telehealth and rural health activities
       
  • To ensure HIPAA compliance when sharing protected patient health information, monitor the US Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) for guidance.

For more information

For specific issues your agency has, or if you have other questions, please contact us. We’re here to help. 

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COVID-19 laws and their impact on state public health agencies

Read this if you are a director, manager, or administrator at a Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) or Rural Health Clinic (RHC).

The latest COVID-19 bill, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act included enhancing Medicare telehealth services for FQHCs and RHCs. This legislation waives the Section 1834(m) restriction on FQHCs and RHCs that prohibits them from serving as distant sites. This means during the COVID-19 State of Emergency, FQHCs and RHCs will be able to serve as distant sites to provide telehealth services to patients in their homes and other eligible locations. The legislation will reimburse FQHCs and RHCs at a rate that is similar to payment for comparable telehealth services under the physician fee schedule (Medicare Part B). FQHCs and RHCs will not be paid the Medicare PPS rate for these services.

Currently, Medicare, unlike many Medicaid programs and commercial payers, still requires the video component for telehealth. Effective immediately, the Office for Civil Rights at the Department of Health and Human Services will exercise its enforcement discretion and will not impose penalties for noncompliance with the regulatory requirements under the HIPAA Rules against covered health care providers in connection with the good faith provision of telehealth during the COVID-19 State of Emergency. Providers who want to use audio or video communication technology to provide telehealth during the COVID-19 State of Emergency can use any non-public facing remote communication product that is available to communicate with patients. Examples of acceptable platforms (non-public facing) include Apple FaceTime, Google G Suite Hangouts Meet, and Skype for Business.

We would also like to remind you of the ability to bill for virtual communication services. Virtual communication services are a brief, non-face-to-face check-in with a patient via communication technology, to assess whether the patient's condition necessitates an office visit. The call must be initiated by the patient and to be billable, the call must be between the patient and a physician, nurse practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse midwife, clinical psychologist, or clinical social worker. If the discussion is conducted by a nurse, health educator, or other clinical personnel, it is not billable as a virtual communication service. There is no video component required for virtual communication services. The check-in cannot relate to a visit with the patient during the previous seven days or result in a visit with the patient within the next 24 hours (or next available appointment). Read the FAQs from Medicare on the virtual communication services.

We continue to be here to support you. If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to reach out to any of us. 

Article
The CARES Act and telehealth services for FQHCs