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The IRS Identity Protection PIN: What is it and why do you need one?

08.12.22

Read this if you file taxes with the IRS for yourself or other individuals.

To protect yourself from identity thieves filing fraudulent tax returns in your name, the IRS recommends using Identity Protection PINs. Available to anyone who can verify their identity online, by phone, or in person, these PINs provide extra security against tax fraud related to stolen social security numbers of Tax ID numbers.

According to the Security Summit—a group of experts from the IRS, state tax agencies, and the US tax industry—the IP PIN is the number one security tool currently available to taxpayers from the IRS.

The simplest way to obtain a PIN is on the IRS website’s Get an IP PIN page. There, you can create an account or log in to your existing IRS account and verify your identity by uploading an identity document such as a driver’s license, state ID, or passport. Then, you must take a “selfie” with your phone or your computer’s webcam as the final step in the verification process.

Important things to know about the IRS IP PIN:

  • You must set up the IP PIN yourself; your tax professional cannot set one up on your behalf.
  • Once set up, you should only share the PIN with your trusted tax prep provider.
  • The IP PIN is valid for one calendar year; you must obtain a new IP PIN each year.
  • The IRS will never call, email or text a request for the IP PIN.
  • The 6-digit IP PIN should be entered onto your electronic tax return when prompted by the software product or onto a paper return next to the signature line.

If you cannot verify your identity online, you have options:

  • Taxpayers with an income of $72,000 or less who are unable to verify their identity online can obtain an IP PIN for the next filing season by filing Form 15227. The IRS will validate the taxpayer’s identity through a phone call.
  • Those with an income more than $72,000, or any taxpayer who cannot verify their identity online or by phone, can make an appointment at a Taxpayer Assistance Center and bring a photo ID and an additional identity document to validate their identity. They’ll then receive the IP PIN by US mail within three weeks.
  • For more information about IRS Identity Protection PINs and to get your IP PIN online, visit the IRS website.

If you have questions about your specific situation, please contact our Tax Consulting and Compliance team. We’re here to help.

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Read this if you are a care provider that receives Medicaid Waiver Payments.

The IRS has recently issued guidance related to the taxability of certain payments to individual care providers of eligible individuals under a state Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services waiver program described in section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act (Medicaid Waiver Payments). Such payments, treated as difficulty of care payments, are excludable from gross income for federal income tax purposes under section 131 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Notice 2014-7, issued on January 3, 2014, provided guidance that deemed the difficulty of care payments as not subject to federal income tax. However, the notice was silent regarding implications related to employment taxes, specifically FICA and FUTA. Additional guidance issued in the fall of 2022 concludes that difficulty of care payments are subject to FICA and FUTA taxes unless an exemption applies.

Generally, if a service provider receiving difficulty of care payments is an employee of the organization providing the payments, then such payments will be considered wages subject only to FICA withholding (but not income tax), and FUTA will be assessed on those wages. If the service provider is an independent contractor, then the organization does not have any withholding obligations and does not need to prepare a Form 1099.

More information on Medicaid Waiver Payments can be found at Certain Medicaid Waiver Payments May Be Excludable From Income | Internal Revenue Service.

If you have any questions on these payments or your specific situation, please contact our Not-for-profit Tax team. We’re here to help.

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Difficulty of care payments and employment taxes

Read this if you are a Maine business or pay taxes in Maine.

Maine Revenue Services has created the new Maine Tax Portal, which makes paying, filing, and managing your state taxes faster, more efficient, convenient, and accessible. The portal replaces a number of outdated services and can be used for a number of tax filings, including:

  • Corporate income tax
  • Estate tax
  • Healthcare provider tax
  • Insurance premium tax
  • Withholding
  • Sales and use tax
  • Service provider tax
  • Pass-through entity withholding
  • BETR

The Maine Tax Portal is being rolled out in four phases, with two of the four phases already completed. Most tax filings for both businesses and individuals are now available. A complete listing can be found on maine.gov. Instructional videos and FAQs can also be found on this site.

In an effort to educate businesses and individuals on the use of the new portal, Maine Revenue Services has been hosting various training sessions. The upcoming schedule can be found on maine.gov

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New Maine Tax Portal: What you need to know

Read this if you are a not-for-profit organization in New Hampshire.

The New Hampshire Legislature has enacted a law that increases the revenue, gains, and support threshold to $2,000,000. This change applies to all charitable organizations with a fiscal year ending after August 6, 2022.

Under the old law, charitable organizations with revenue, gains, and other support totaling $1,000,000 or more were required to file audited financial statements prepared in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) along with their Annual Reports and Forms 990.

Understand the requirements and revised audit threshold

Charitable organizations with revenue, gains, and other support of $2,000,000 or more will now be required to file with the Charitable Trusts Unit audited financial statements, along with their Form 990 and annual report. 

Charitable organizations with revenue, gains, and other support between $500,000 and $1,999,999 will be required to submit, with their Form 990 and annual report, a set of financial statements prepared in accordance with GAAP that may or may not be prepared by a certified public accountant.

Please note: the financial statement requirements outlined above do not pertain to private foundations.

Access the new forms

The New Hampshire Attorney General recently adopted new rules applicable to all charitable trusts, including charitable organizations and professional fundraisers. These changes include the adoption of new paper and online forms.

Effective October 7, 2022, the Charitable Trusts Unit of the New Hampshire Attorney General’s office can only accept forms submitted electronically through its website or paper forms with the date “September 2022.”

The acceptable forms are available here. Previous versions of these forms will no longer be accepted. Please contact our not-for-profit tax team if you have any questions about your specific situation. We’re here to help.

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Major changes to 2022 Charitable Trusts Unit filings: new rules now in effect

Read this if you are a tax-exempt organization.

The IRS recently issued proposed regulations (REG-106864-18) related to Internal Revenue Code Section 512(a)(6), which requires tax-exempt entities to calculate unrelated business taxable income (UBTI) separately for each unrelated trade or business carried on by the organization.

For years beginning after December 31, 2017, exempt organizations with more than one unrelated trade or business are no longer permitted to aggregate income and deductions from all unrelated trades or businesses when calculating UBTI. In August 2018, the IRS issued Notice 2018-67, which discussed and solicited comments regarding various issues arising under Code Section 512(a)(6) and set forth interim guidance and transition rules relating to that section. 

The good news
The new proposed regulations expand upon Notice 2018-67 and provide for the following:

  • An exempt organization would identify each of its separate unrelated trades or businesses using the first two digits of the NAICS code that most accurately describes the trade or business. Activities in different geographic areas may be aggregated.
  • The total UBTI of an organization with more than one unrelated trade or business would be the sum of the UBTI computed with respect to each separate unrelated trade or business (subject to the limitation that UBTI with respect to any separate unrelated trade or business cannot be less than zero). 
  • An exempt organization with more than one unrelated trade or business would determine the NOL deduction allowed separately with respect to each of its unrelated trades or businesses.
  • An organization with losses arising in a tax year beginning before January 1, 2018 (pre-2018 NOLs), and with losses arising in a tax year beginning after December 31, 2017 (post-2017 NOLs), would deduct its pre-2018 NOLs from total UBTI before deducting any post-2017 NOLs with regard to a separate unrelated trade or business against the UBTI from such trade or business. 
  • An organization's investment activities would be treated collectively as a separate unrelated trade or business. In general, an organization's investment activities would be limited to its:
     
    1. Qualifying partnership interests
    2. Qualifying S corporation interests
    3. Debt-financed property or properties 

Organizations described in Code Sec. 501(c)(3) are classified as publicly supported charities if they meet certain support tests. The proposed regulations would permit an organization with more than one unrelated trade or business to aggregate its net income and net losses from all of its unrelated business activities for purposes of determining whether the organization is publicly supported. 

The missing news: Unaddressed items from the new guidance
With the changes provided by these proposed regulations we anticipate less complexity and lower compliance costs in applying Code Section 512(a)(6). While this new guidance is considered taxpayer friendly, the IRS still has more work to do. Items not yet addressed include:

  • Allocation of expenses among unrelated trade or businesses and between exempt and non-exempt activities.
  • The ordering rules for applying charitable deductions and NOLs.
  • Net operating losses as changed under the CARES Act.

The IRS is requesting comments on numerous key situations. Until the regulations are finalized, organizations can rely on either these proposed regulations, Notice 2018-67, or a reasonable good-faith interpretation of Code Sections 511-514 considering all the facts and circumstances.
We will keep you informed with the latest developments.

If you have any questions, please contact the not-for-profit consulting team

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IRS unrelated business taxable income update: The good news and the missing news

Did you know that there was more than a 40% increase (from $4.3 billion to $6.0 billion) in civil penalties assessed by the IRS regarding employment tax, for the 2016 fiscal year?

A recent report from the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration calls for more cases to involve criminal investigation by the Department of Justice. This is significant because the requirements needed to prove a civil violation under Sec. 6672 are nearly identical to the requirements of a criminal violation under Sec. 7202, and a criminal violation can result, among other penalties, in imprisonment for up to five years.

The issue of employment taxes encompasses all businesses, even tax-exempt entities. For fiscal year 2016, employment tax issues were involved in over 26% of audits of exempt organizations. One main reason why employment tax is a major issue? Its role in funding our government: employment taxes make up $2.3 trillion dollars (70%) of the $3.3 trillion dollars collected by the IRS for fiscal year 2016.

And noncompliance is a major issue, with roughly $45.6 billion of unemployment taxes, interest and penalties still owed to the IRS as of December 2015. This trend of increasing noncompliance, combined with the vital role employment taxes has in funding our government helps explain why the IRS has increased focus and enforcement in this area.

Should your independent contractor truly be an employee? Did you properly report fringe benefits as taxable income to the individuals who received them? Knowing the answers to these questions can help you stay in compliance with the law. If you have any questions about your employment tax situation, or how we can help you ensure compliance on this and other tax issues, please contact your BerryDunn tax advisor.
 

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The IRS cares about employment tax—why you should too.

Many of my hospital clients have an increased incidence of providing temporary housing for locums, temps and some employees and, as a result, have questions regarding the proper tax reporting to these individuals.   

First things first: the employment status of the individual needs to be determined before anything else.

If the person is an independent contractor (for example, a locum paid through an agency), a Form 1099-Misc usually needs to be filed for payments made to the individual (or agency) of $600 or more. A 1099-Misc is not required in the following circumstances:

  • The payment is made to a corporation or a tax-exempt organization.
  • Payments for travel reimbursement are excluded as long as they are paid under an accountable plan (which itself can be another topic for a blog). For example, an independent contractor submits a timely expense report to you with their lodging receipts for reimbursement. The amounts for the expense reimbursement do not have to be included on the 1099-Misc. If you pay the travel expenses directly or provide the housing, you also do not have to include these payments on the 1099-Misc.

If the individual is an employee, you should follow the guidance in IRS Publication 15-B, which can be found on www.irs.gov.

The basic rule of thumb is that every fringe benefit provided to an employee is a taxable benefit unless there is an exclusion listed in Publication 15-B.

The lodging exclusion begins on page 15 (of the 2016 publication), and there is an example regarding a hospital listed near the bottom of that page in the left column. For lodging to meet the exclusion, it must pass three tests:

  1. The lodging must be furnished on your business premises. I’ve seen some guidance that allowed the exclusion when the lodging was in close proximity to the business premise (within a mile, etc.).
     
  2. The lodging is furnished for the employer’s convenience. The employer furnishing the lodging to the employee must have a substantial business reason for doing so other than to provide the employee with additional pay. For example, the employee is on call for emergencies 4 or 5 days a week, so must live in close proximity to the hospital.
     
  3. The employee must accept the lodging as a condition of employment. The employer must require the employee to accept the lodging because they need to live on your business premises to be able to properly perform their duties. We recommend including this condition of employment directly in the employee’s written employment contract.

If lodging does not meet all three of these tests, then it must be treated as a taxable fringe benefit with the appropriate payroll taxes withheld from the employee’s pay.

If you are also providing meals, the discussion on employer-provided meals also begins on page 15 of Publication 15-B, with the discussion for meals provided on your business premises starting on page 16.

A discussion related to transportation benefits begins on page 18. We have also had some questions from clients regarding transportation. For example, one client had an employee who dropped down to part-time status and moved from Maine to Florida. The employee agreed to continue working at the hospital one week a month, and the hospital agreed to pay for the flight back and forth. The individual continued to be treated as an employee. The flight is the employee’s commuting expense, and there is no exclusion for reimbursement of commuting expenses. Therefore, the flights had to be included in the employee’s compensation and reported on his W-2.

Many of these taxable benefits are being paid through an accounts payable system rather than payroll, and so can be easily missed. Withholding for these benefits at each pay period is much easier to accomplish rather than all at once at year end. It’s important for your HR department to communicate with the payroll office whenever unusual employment terms and benefits are being offered to employees to ensure proper tax treatment.

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When it comes to temporary housing for hospital employees, IRS publication 15-B can be your friend

Read this if your organization receives charitable donations.

As the holiday season has passed and tax season is now upon us, we have our own list of considerations that we would like to share—so that you don’t end up on the IRS’ naughty list!

Donor acknowledgment letters

It is important for organizations receiving gifts to consider the following guidelines, as doing some work now may save you time (and maybe a fine or two) later.

Charitable (i.e., 501(c)(3)) organizations are required to provide a contemporaneous (i.e., timely) donor acknowledgment letter to all donors who contribute $250 or more to the organization, whether it be cash or non-cash items (e.g., publicly traded securities, real estate, artwork, vehicles, etc.) received. The letter should include the following:

  • Name of the organization
  • Amount of cash contribution
  • Description of non-cash items (but not the value)
  • Statement that no goods and services were provided (assuming this is the case)
  • Description and good faith estimate of the value of goods and services provided by the organization in return for the contribution

Additionally, when a donor makes a payment greater than $75 to a charitable organization partly as a contribution and partly as a payment for goods and services, a disclosure statement is required to notify the donor of the value of the goods and services received in order for the donor to determine the charitable contribution component of their payment.

If a charitable organization receives noncash donations, it may be asked to sign Form 8283. This form is required to be filed by the donor and included with their personal income tax return. If a donor contributes noncash property (excluding publicly traded securities) valued at over $5,000, the organization will need to sign Form 8283, Section B, Part IV acknowledging receipt of the noncash item(s) received.

For noncash items such as cars, boats, and even airplanes that are donated there is a separate Form 1098-C, Contributions of Motor Vehicles, Boats, and Airplanes, which the donee organization must file. A copy of the Form 1098-C is provided to the donor and acts as acknowledgment of the gift. For more information, you can read our article on donor acknowledgments.

Gifts to employees

At the same time, many employers find themselves in a giving spirit, wishing to reward the employees for another year of hard work. While this generosity is well-intended, gifts to employees can be fraught with potential tax consequences organizations should be aware of. Here’s what you need to know about the rules on employee gifts.

First and foremost, the IRS is very clear that cash and cash equivalents (specifically gift cards) are always included as taxable income when provided by the employer, regardless of amount, with no exceptions. This means that if you plan to give your employees cash or a gift card this year, the value must be included in the employees’ wages and is subject to all payroll taxes.

There are, however, a few ways to make nontaxable gifts to employees. IRS Publication 15 offers a variety of examples of de minimis (minimal) benefits, defined as any property or service you provide to an employee that has a minimal value, making the accounting for it unreasonable and administratively impracticable. Examples include holiday or birthday gifts, like flowers, or a fruit basket, or occasional tickets for theater or sporting events.

Additionally, holiday gifts can also be nontaxable if they are in the form of a gift coupon and if given for a specific item (with no redeemable cash value). A common example would be issuing a coupon to your employee for a free ham or turkey redeemable at the local grocery store. For more information, please see our article on employee gifts.

Other year-end filing requirements

As the end of the calendar year approaches, it is also important to start thinking about Form 1099 filing requirements. There are various 1099 forms; 1099-INT to report interest income, 1099-DIV to report dividend income, 1099-NEC to report nonemployee compensation, and 1099-MISC to report other miscellaneous income, to name a few.

Form 1099-NEC reports non-employment income which is not included on a W-2. Organizations must issue 1099-NECs to payees (there are some exclusions) who receive at least $600 in non-employment income during the calendar year. A non-employee may be an independent contractor, or a person hired on a contract basis to complete work, such as a graphic designer. Payments to attorneys or CPAs for services rendered that exceed $600 for the tax year must be reported on a Form 1099-NEC. However, a 1099-MISC would be sent to an Attorney for payments of settlements. For additional questions on which 1099 form to use please contact your tax advisor.

While federal income tax is not always required to be withheld, there are some instances when it is. If a payee does not furnish their Tax Identification Number (TIN) to the organization, then the organization is required to withhold taxes on payments reported in box 1 of Form 1099-NEC. There are other instances, and the rates can differ so if you have questions, please reach out to your tax advisor. 1099 forms are due to the recipient and the IRS by January 31st.

Whether organizations are receiving gifts, giving employee gifts, or thinking about acknowledgments and other reporting we hope that by making our list and checking it twice we can save you some time to spend with your loved ones this holiday season. We wish you all a very happy and healthy holiday season!

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Making a year-end list and checking it twice

Read this if your company is considering financing through a sale leaseback.

In today’s economic climate, some companies are looking for financing alternatives to traditional senior or mezzanine debt with financial institutions. As such, more companies are considering entering into sale leaseback arrangements. Depending on your company’s situation and goals, a sale leaseback may be a good option. Before you decide, here are some advantages and disadvantages that you should consider.

What is a sale leaseback?

A sale leaseback is when a company sells an asset and simultaneously enters into a lease contract with the buyer for the same asset. This transaction can be used as a method of financing, as the company is able to retrieve cash from the sale of the asset while still being able to use the asset through the lease term. Sale leaseback arrangements can be a viable alternative to traditional financing for a company that owns significant “hard assets” and has a need for liquidity with limited borrowing capacity from traditional financial institutions, or when the company is looking to supplement its financing mix.

Below are notable advantages, disadvantages, and other considerations for companies to consider when contemplating a sale leaseback transaction:

Advantages of using a sale leaseback

Sale leasebacks may be able to help your company: 

  • Increase working capital to deploy at a greater rate of return, if opportunities exist
  • Maintain control of the asset during the lease term
  • Avoid restrictive covenants associated with traditional financing
  • Capitalize on market conditions, if the fair value of an asset has increased dramatically
  • Reduce financing fees
  • Receive sale proceeds equal to or greater than the fair value of the asset, which generally is contingent on the company’s ability to fund future lease commitments

Disadvantages of using a sale leaseback

On the other hand, a sale leaseback may:

  • Create a current tax obligation for capital gains; however, the company will be able to deduct future lease payments.
  • Cause loss of right to receive any future appreciation in the fair value of the asset
  • Cause a lack of control of the asset at the end of the lease term
  • Require long-term financial commitments with fixed payments
  • Create loss of operational flexibility (e.g., ability to move from a leased facility in the future)
  • Create a lost opportunity to diversify risk by owning the asset

Other considerations in assessing if a sale leaseback is right for you

Here are some questions you should ask before deciding if a sale leaseback is the right course of action for your company: 

  • What are the length and terms of the lease?
  • Are the owners considering a sale of the company in the near future?
  • Is the asset core to the company’s operations?
  • Is entering into the transaction fulfilling your fiduciary duty to shareholders and investors?
  • What is the volatility in the fair value of the asset?
  • Does the transaction create any other tax opportunities, obligations, or exposures?

The Financial Accounting Standards Board’s new standard on leases, Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 842, is now effective for both public and private companies. Accounting for sale leaseback transactions under ASC Topic 842 can be very complex with varying outcomes depending on the structure of the transaction. It is important to determine if a sale has occurred, based on guidance provided by ASC Topic 842, as it will determine the initial and subsequent accounting treatment.

The structure of a sale leaseback transactions can also significantly impact a company’s tax position and tax attributes. If you’re contemplating a sale leaseback transaction, reach out to our team of experts to discuss whether this is the right path for you.

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Is a sale leaseback transaction right for you?